Land Advertisements in the Virginia Herald

The following are transcriptions of advertisements of land for sale in the Virginia Herald published in Fredericksburg, Virginia 1807-1830.

The Virginia Herald
January 23, 1807 3:4
To be rented.
My house upon the hill, lately in the tenure of the Rev. Mr. Stevenson. Its situation is on the square opposite the courthouse, and convenient to the church, market, and main-street. The prospect equal, if not superior, to any in town. It contains 13 spacious rooms, 8 of them with fire places, 5 convenient closets on the first and second floors; a cellar, the size of the whole house; a good kitchen, laundry, and under the same roof a good lodging room with a fire place. There is also a good smoke house and dairy, with garden ground sufficient for a family, and a spacious yard betwixt the dwelling house and kitchen, and in which is a well of excellent water.
Charles Yates.
Fred'g Jan. 23, 1807

The Virginia Herald
March 3, 1807 1:2
For sale, My farm in Culpeper county in the neighborhood of the Court-house, and lying on the waters of Muddy run, containing by estimation 700 acres; the building improvements are large and elegant; the quality is first rate and well adapted to the culture of corn, wheat, and tobacco. The situation is in every respect desirable and healthy. it will well admit of a division, which will be done if required. Possession will be given at any time; one third of the purchase money will be required in cash; for the remainder considerable indulgence will be given, or good bonds will be received in payment. Any further information may be had of the subscriber residing on the premises.
R. H. Yancey.
February 13, 1807.

The Virginia Herald
May 15, 1807 4:2
The subscriber offers for sale, his plantation, at the head of Potomac creek, within 5 miles of Fredericksburg and Falmouth, and one and a half of a landing on the creek. It contains 360 acres and adjoins the lands of Mr. Seldon, of Mr.. Thomas Fitzbugh, Major H. Fitzbugh, and Capt. Bell, and is, in quality, inferior to none in the neighborhood. There is, on it, a sufficiency of prime meadow land in one body, to produce 100,000 pounds of timothy hay annually, and a good deal more than that might be converted into grass land to advantage.
-There is also a grist mill, which has never failed in the driest seasons to grind more than enough for the use of the plantation. The buildings are in tolerable repair, and sufficient to accommodate a genteel family; in short, it is extremely rare, that a plantation possessing such advantages in soil, situation, &c. is exposed to sale; and nothing would induce the subscriber to part from it, were he not desirous of removing to the state of South Carolina.-The terms will be accommodating.
Benjamin Jones Stafford county, May 5, 1807.

The Virginia Herald
June 5, 1807 3:3
The subscriber is authorized to offer for sale, the dwelling house and store in Fredericksburg, on Lot No. 28; 2 story high, 36 feet by 22, with a kitchen and smoke house, now occupied by Messrs. James Young & Co.-Also the large and commodious warehouse on the bank of the river, on the upper part of Lot No. 5, 2 story high, with an excellent cellar, 40 feet by 24. This property is insured and will be sold on liberal terms or for good bonds.
James Vass.
Falmouth, 3d June, 1807.

The Virginia Herald
June 9, 1807 4:2
For sale, 4 valuable tracts of land, all in Culpeper county. The first containing 490 acres, lying in the mountains adjoining the lands of Col. William Thornton. This land is well timbered and watered, well adapted to the culture of corn and wheat, and superior to any in that part of the country for the production of tobacco. It is in the vicinity of a good merchant mill, and has a valuable orchard.
The second, 2 miles from the Culpeper Courthouse, and contains 485 acres. The quality of this tract is good and well suited to the cultivation of corn, wheat, &c. Upon the margin of the mountain-run, which passes through the land, is 100 acres of fertile bottom peculiarly adapted to the growth of timothy. Its Improvements consist of a conveniently constructed framed house, four rooms on a floor, with all necessary out houses; has a good orchard and is plentifully supplied with water.
The third, that elegant and well known tract called Belville, adjoining Mr. Strode, and contains 485 acres, a large proportion of which is meadow. Few tracts unite more advantages or is recommended by more conveniences, than this; its situation is airy and salubrious, its soil kind and fertile, the neighborhood respectable and agreeable; its improvements are various and commodious comprising a good dwelling house, convenient offices and out houses in good repair; an extensive and well selected orchard, and an abundant supply of excellent water.
The fourth contains 153 acres, contiguous to the preceding, to which it was intended to be appendent and is covered with heavy and valuable timber.-A more minute description of the above property is thought unnecessary, as it is presumable any who may be inclined to purchase will choose to examine it before entering into a contract.-The terms of sale will be liberal and accommodating.
Samuel Washington.
Clifford Hill, Culpeper, May 25, 1807.

The Virginia Herald
July 3, 1807 1:1
The subscriber, offers for sale the following property. One fourth payable in cash or country produce, on receiving deeds; and three fourths at annual payments, a plantation, in Culpeper county, near Norman's ford, 28 miles above Falmouth, containing 700 acres, about 400 of which are cleared, under good fencing, and in excellent cropping order, the residue in woods and good timber, the whole equal in quality to any lands in that neighborhood, and well suited for tobacco, wheat and corn, and for grass, particularly so; on this plantation there is a young orchard, a plain and convenient house, &c suitable habitations for negroes, and a good barn for securing the crops. A farm 4 miles above Falmouth, on the north side of the river, and bounded in part by it, containing 281 acres, about 140 of which are in cultivation and chiefly lately cleared, the rest in woods, and the whole deemed equal in quality if not superior to any lands adjoining. The improvements are a large barn lately built and convenient houses for an overseer and negroes. Also, 500 acres wood land near Falmouth.
Robert Dunbar.
Falmouth, June 30th, 1807.

The Virginia Herald
July 24, 1807 3:4
For rent, That eligible stand for a mercantile business at Roger's and the subscriber's mills, now in the occupancy of Archibald Borden, who carries on that business in the grocery line. There are on this tenement a complete set of a dwelling and other necessary houses for the accommodation of a genteel family; a store house with a good dry cellar and counting and lumber rooms; a well enclosed garden, an orchard and several acres of good land well enclosed. Possession may be had on the 1st day of January next.
Joseph Pallard Jr.
Thornberry, July 20, 1807.

The Virginia Herald
August 7, 1807 1:1
A great bargain! To be sold or rented on very reasonable terms, 350 acres of prime tobacco land, lying in the county of Caroline, within one mile of the Rappahannock, 5 of Port Royal, and 7 from a merchant mill.-The many advantages which this land possesses over any other more remote, renders it an object worth the attention of any person wishing to purchase or rent.-There is on it a good dwelling house, &c. and an excellent spring of water near the house-a healthy situation-and a respectable neighborhood-The rent can be easily paid by the tan bark, staves, hoop-poles, and wood on the land, which find a ready sale in town. A credit of 21 years, if desired, will be given, provided the interest is paid annually. The contractor may have the privilege of seeding wheat at any time after the first of September next. There is land enclosed sufficient to seed 40 bushels of wheat, a great part of which is now in tobacco. The land is laid off in two lots, and will be sold or rented together or separate-For terms apply to the subscriber living between the Bowling-Green and Fredericksburg.
Rodham Kenner.
Meadow Hill, July 27, 1807.

The Virginia Herald
September 1, 1807 3:3
Will be sold, at public sale, to the highest bidder, on Thursday the 1st of October next, on the premises, all that property known by the name of Madison's Mills, at Barnet's Ford, in Madison County, together with 161 acres of land, attached thereto with their appurtenances and buildings, which are on an extensive scale. The mill house being frame on a stone foundation of 60 by 42 feet having four floors, store house, and other necessary out buildings-This property is situated on the river Rapid Anna in a public and populous neighborhood. The terms of sale will be for money, payable in three equal payments. Bonds with good security, as also a mortgage on the premises, will be required, as ordered by a decree of the Madison court at June term, under date June 25, 1807.
Lewis Jennings, William Mallory, John Walker, Comm'rs.
August 30, 1807.

The Virginia Herald
September 22, 1807 3:4
For sale, my estate in Westmoreland county, adjoining Leed's Town, containing between 1000 and 1100 acres. The lands are as good as lands generally are in that part of the neighborhood, and a good part of them much superior, being first rate low grounds, chiefly reclaimed Pocosin, laying perfectly dry, they abound too in fine timber, such as cedar, chestnut, and oak. The improvements are a commodious dwelling house, with convenient offices sufficient to accommodate a large and genteel family, agreeably situated on an eminence commanding a pleasing view of the two rivers Potomac and Rappahannock, there are young orchards just beginning to bear of apples and peaches, with other fruit trees, and there is a grist mill, with an overshot wheel, and with a bolting chest in her, placed nearly the centre of the estate worth between 80 and 100 barrels of toil corn per annum, besides grinding for the family's use. It is thought unnecessary to be more particular as I doubt any person inclining to buy will view the premises, when I will make known my price and terms.
George Fitzhugh.
September 12, 1807.

The Virginia Herald
September 25, 1807 3:3
Will be sold, to the highest bidder, on the 25th day of November next, if fair, if not the next fair day, a tract of land, lying in Spotsylvania county, belonging to the estate of William Carter, deceased, and containing about 970 acres. The land lies 3 or 4 miles from the courthouse and adjoins Mr. Edmund Foster's Tavern. On the tract there is a dwelling house about 36 by 18 feet, with two rooms and a shed below stairs, and two rooms above, two brick chimneys at one end and one at the other, a barn, corn house, and some other out houses, all in want of repair-adjoining the dwelling house there is a large and excellent apple orchard, and near the lower end of the land there is a log dwelling house, several out houses and some fruit trees. There are two plantations on the tract; the one adjoining the dwelling house is mostly old land, but a good deal of it is still in heart; the other adjoining the log house is mostly fresh, and in good order for cropping. The land lies well for dividing into two tracts, but by the last will of my testator, it is directed to be sold entire. I think it unnecessary to be more particular in the description of the land, as I presume that no person would purchase without first viewing it; it will be shown by myself living about 4 miles above the courthouse, or by Mr. Edmund Foster, adjoining the land. 12 months credit will be given the purchaser, and bond and approved security will be required, by John Carter, Administrator.
September 14, 1807.

The Virginia Herald
September 25, 1807 3:4
Lands for sale! The subscribers offer for sale that very valuable tract of land, whereon the late Mr. James Marye, deceased, resided, containing about 1500 acres, lying on both sides of Lewis river (A branch of Mattapony) in Spotsylvania county, within 10 miles of Fredericksburg. The quality and situation of this land is equal to any in the counties off the Rappahannock, indeed there are upwards of 200 acres inferior to none, the whole well watered, and advantageously adapted to planting and farming. There are 80 or lOO acres of meadow land, 20 or 25 of which are now in timothy and herd grass, and very productive; there are also large apple and peach orchards that yield very abundantly. The dwelling, overseer's, and other necessary farm houses are convenient and in good repair, except the barn, which is of stout timbers, 40 feet square, well weather boarded, but wants a new roof, the first of bad timber. The whole of this land will be sold together or divided-We want about 1000 pounds, for the residue payments will be accommodated to the convenience of purchasers.-These lands will be shewn and particulars made known by Mr., Edward Herndon, who lives near them, or either of the subscribers.
Mildred Marye, John McCoull.
September 15, 1807

The Virginia Herald
October 16, 1807 4:1
Notice! Will be sold, to the highest bidder, for ready money, on the premises, on the 31st day of this month (October) a valuable mill, working two pair of stones, with 195 acres of land annexed, on the Southanna river, 5 miles from Louisa Courthouse. The mill house is 32 by 38 feet, two story high, and at a small expense might be put in good order for manufacturing wheat.-The mill seat is an excellent one, and situated in an excellent wheat country. The land is very strong and well adapted to the culture of corn, wheat, oats and tobacco. This property is well worth the attention of any person who would wish to own such; it will certainly be sold. I would likewise sell or exchange for lands in Kentucky, the tract of land on which I now live, containing 5161 acres, situate about 3 miles from the above mentioned mill, on the roundabout creek. This tract is well known to be a valuable one, in good order for cropping and very well improved. For this land I will make the payments easy for the purchaser.
Henry Garrett.
Louisa, October 1st, 1807.

The Virginia Herald
October 16, 1807 4:2
For sale, My farm, on the Potomac, near Mattox creek, containing about 600 acres. The soil is inferior to none on that river, for corn, wheat, and tobacco; and the advantage of wild fowl, fish, and oysters, in great abundance and perfection, make it highly desirable for those who wish to purchase. There is a quantity of oak timber fit for ship building, on this land.-One third of the purchase money will be required to be paid down, the balance, in two annual installments.
For terms apply to Thomas Magruder, Esq. in Port Royal or to the subscriber.
James Bankhead Port Royal, Sept. 22, 1807.

The Virginia Herald
December 18, 1807 4:3
Valuable property for sale, on 10 years credit Will be offered for sale to the highest bidder, on Tuesday the 29th of December next, on the premises, if fair, if not, the next fair day, the tract of land, whereon the subscriber now lives, lying in the counties of Caroline and Spotsylvania, about 14 miles from Fredericksburg, and containing by old survey 430 acres.-Somewhat more perhaps than one half the land is cleared and enclosed; is of good soil for farming and lies well; the balance is generally well timbered, and a great part of it is rich tobacco land. The improvements are a dwelling house containing 4 rooms below stairs with a fire place in each, but unfinished above, a large well enclosed garden, a kitchen, laundry, smoke house, dairy, barn, stable, corn-house, &c. mostly in good repair.-The situation is pleasant and healthy, the water good, and very few places can vie with it for variety of the most choice fruit. At the same time and place and on the same terms, will be offered to the highest bidder, one moiety of the property adjoining the above, called Roger's Mills, together with a moiety of 50 acres of land thereto annexed. These mills are finely situated for custom, on a very public road, at the falls of the river Ta, one of the four main branches of the river Mattapony. The dam is of stone, the foundation and abutments of solid rock, and the stream markable for its constant supply of water in the driest seasons. The house contains three pair stones, a fan, rolling screen, bolting-cloths, &c. and is sufficiently large and commodious for carrying on the manufacturing business to advantage.-On the premises is a store house, containing besides the store room, a counting room and lodging room (with a fire place in each) and also a good cellar. This house has been used several years as a grocery, and is considered an excellent stand for a grocer.-The farm and mill will be sold separately and both on a credit of ten years, the purchaser or purchasers paying interest annually, and giving deeds of trust on the property, together with such other additional security as may be deemed adequate for the length of credit; but a considerable discount will be allowed for earlier payments, and perhaps good lands in the western country or good bonds, well guaranteed, might answer the same purpose as cash. Those inclined to purchase are invited to call on the subscriber for a view of the premises.
*Personal property for sale.
Thomas Rogers.
Caroline, Oct. 5th, 1807.

The Virginia Herald
January 4, 1808 3:3
A great Bargain may be had! *Horses for sale I wish to also sell,a handsome small farm, containing 176 acres, adjoining the Caroline Springs, for 1000 dollars. This farm is level, free from stone, and about one half in woods, has a good dwelling house quite new, with many other useful houses on it, and a never failing spring of excellent water, within 100 yards of the house. It would be a fine retreat for any gentleman's family, in the sickly season, as it is remarkably healthy, and situated in a good neighbourhood, within 3 miles of a post office, and has an abundance of meadow land, and the soil such as would reward the labourer amply. Payment will be made to suit the purchaser, who is invited to apply to the subscriber, living on the premises: who has for sale an imported copper still size 96 gallons, with an excellent lead worm, for 100 dollars.
Anthony Thornton.
Caroline County. Jan. 4, 1808.

The Virginia Herald
March 8, 1808 1:1
Rose-Mount for sale.
The subscriber having other arrangements in view, wishes to sell this very desirable seat, lying on the main road leading from Fredericksburg to Spotsylvania courthouse, and about half way between the two. This farm (which contains between 4 and 500 acres) may with truth be said to unite all the advantages that a farmer can expect or desire in this part of the country. The situation being remarkably healthy, with an abundant supply of excellent water from a well in the yard, and several fine springs, none of which have ever been known to fail; the soil kind and fertile, the buildings handsome and commodious, comprising every kind of house that a farmer can possibly have occasion for, all in complete repair. The orchards, which are very extensive, consist of choice and well selected fruits, and may with safety be calculated upon for an annual profit of from 6 to 800 dollars; the neighborhood respectable and agreeable. In short a full and complete description of this property (which has been universally admired) would swell an advertisement far beyond the usual size, the subscriber therefore presumes it is only necessary to give notice that it is for sale at a reasonable price, and on convenient payments, to produce an immediate application, which may be made to him on the premises.
William Broadus.
Spotsylvania, 1st March, 1808

The Virginia Herald
March 8, 1808 1:3
For sale, About 700 acres of land, in the county of Amherst, lying on the waters of the Tye river, and about 5 miles from the Court-house.-This land is very fertile, and heavily timbered with poplar, walnut, chestnut, &c. and very little of it cleared, which consists of a small tenement under the annual rent of 10. a good apple orchard, negro quarters, &c. This land has been considered equal if not superior to any in that country for the raising of tobacco.-The terms will be made known by applying to Major Thomas Maffee, near the premises, or Robert Rose.
Fauquier, Feb. 17, 1808.

The Virginia Herald
March 22, 1808 1:2
The subscriber will sell a bargain in his half of those well known and valuable mills called Rogers' Mills, on Mattapony; there is attached to them 50 acres of land (some of which is well enclosed and highly improved) a store house, miller's house, and kitchen, &c. in all which the subscriber had an equal moiety or half; there are also on the 50 acres a set of good new dwelling houses, kitchen, meat-house, stables, &c. with a garden and the yard well enclosed; in which the subscriber has an exclusive right; this property may be purchased very low and on 7 annual installments for the whole purchase except 150 which will be expected in cash or notes negotiable at the Bank of Virginia. Also, that well known stand Thornsbury whereon the subscriber lives, and adjoining those mills, situated on the near road from Fredericksburg to Richmond, 14 miles from the former and 46 from the latter.
Joseph Pollard, Jr.
March 10, 1808.

The Virginia Herald
July 15, 1808 3:3
Will be sold, at public sale, to the highest bidder, in the town of Stevensburg, on the 20th day of August next, the tract of land, belonging to the estate of William Gray, deceased, containing about 1300 acres, which may be divided with convenience into 3 or more farms so as to suit purchasers if required. There is on this land a copper mine which was worked to advantage in the first settlement of this part of the country, and I have no doubt from information lately obtained that it may now be carried on to a considerable advantage, and profit to any person or company that will engage in the business; but the advantages exclusive of the mine, that this farm possesses, is a sufficient inducement for a farmer or grazer to come forward and purchase as it is equal to any farm in the neighborhood for grain or grass.-Should any persons wish to make a private bargain for the land, they may do so before the day of sale. The terms to the purchaser will be liberal and made known on that day. Should it not be sold, it will be to rent for the ensuing year.-For terms apply to the subscriber living near Stevensburg.
Gabriel Gray, Executor of Wm. Gray, dec.
Culpeper, 10th July, 1808.

The Virginia Herald
August 16, 1808 1:1
I will sell a bargain in land, and take in payment two-thirds Green-River lands the balance in cash or young negroes-The is a part of the land which formerly belonged to Philip Alexander, and lies near the Elk Marsh in Fauquier county, containing by late survey 608 and two-thirds acres, a great proportion of it lays rolling, and abundantly rich to bring fine tobacco as may be seen by the crop now growing; the balance is fine meadow land, a small part of which is sown in timothy, and about 15 acres more is nicely prepared and will be sown in grass this fall-The whole of this land is heavily timbered, except about 150 acres, 50 of which was cleared last winter and the winter before.-On it is a good dwelling house, stable, kitchen,and other necessary out houses, all built within the last year.
Thomas Green.
Fauquier, August 8, 1808.

The Virginia Herald
August 26, 1808 3:4
To be rented, and immediate possession given, The house occupied at present by Messrs. John and Geo. Lewis-the store room in front by Mr. John Gray as a book store.-As this property is well known, it will be unnecessary to say more than that the house is large, comfortable, and well calculated for a merchant, having a good cellar the whole length of the building floored with plank, a new stable calculated for 3 horses, and a garden well enclosed, with every necessary out house. For terms apply to the subscriber or Mr. John Lewis.
Robert Lewis.
Pine Grove, August 25, 1808.

The Virginia Herald
October 14, 1808 3:4
To rent, for 5 years, The plantation whereon Mrs. Mary Fowler now lives, adjoining Spotsylvania Courthouse, containing about 800 acres; on which is a very valuable grist mill, which has plenty of water all the year, a dwelling house with three rooms and a passage below stairs, and two rooms above with fire places, a large barn, and other necessary out houses. The plantation is large and well adapted to the growth of corn, rye, wheat, oats, and cotton. There is a very extensive piece of very valuable low grounds on the river on which crops of tobacco and grass might be cultivated to great advantage. For further particulars enquire of Therit Towles, living at Spotsylvania Court house.
Philip Slaughter October 10. 1808.

The Virginia Herald
October 26, 1808 1:1
Will be sold, To the highest bidder, on the premises, on the 2d Thursday in November next, My plantation, near Mattox Bridge, at present occupied by Mr. Thomas Hill, containing 150 acres, more or less; one third of which is covered with heavy oak and green timber; it is an excellent stand for a store-the improvements are a dwelling house, with convenient out houses, and a store house. The property is subject to the dower of Mrs. Berryman. As it is presumed that any person wishing to purchase will first view the premises, a further description is thought unnecessary. The terms will be $500 cash on the day of sale, and the balance in 12 months, to carry interest from the date, to be secured by a deed of trust on the land.
William Berklay.
Westmoreland county, Oct. 16, 1808.

The Virginia Herald
November 2, 1808 3:4
Land and negroes for sale.
The subscriber offers for sale, his farm, in the upper end of Caroline, containing about 285 acres. On this farm are a dwelling house, with 5 rooms below and 4 above stairs, in good repair; a barn, corn-house, kitchen, and dairy, all new, and other valuable improvements. If this property should not be disposed of before Monday, 19th December next, it will then if the day be fair, if not, the next fair day, be rented for the ensuing year. *personal estate for sale.
Robert Thompkins.
October 29, 1808.

The Virginia Herald
February 25, 1809 3:3
Valuable property for sale.
The subscriber being desirous of removing to a commercial town, offers for sale, his mills in the county of Madison, situated in a good neighborhood for commanding grain, and on an excellent stream.-There is a manufacturing mill, 62 feet by 36, three stories high, with two pair of 41 burr stones, wheat and flour elevators, and all other machinery necessary for facilitating and expediting business.-a corn mill that receives about 100 barrels toll-corn per annum-an excellent saw mill, built upon the most approved plan and which is very valuable-also a machine for picking cotton, which may be made very profitable.-The whole of the above property is in excellent repair.-Attached to the above are 40 acres of excellent land, on which is a new and comfortable dwelling house, kitchen, meat house, ice house, (filled with ice) an excellent stable, and all other necessary offices-a handsome yard and garden handsomely enclosed.-Likewise an excellent storehouse, 36 feet by 18, with a shed the whole length of the house-miller's and cooper's houses and cooper's shop-Also 100 acres of land about 3/4 of a mile from the mill, on which are 250 bearing apple trees, and a quantity of pine timber, which will be valuable to the owner of the mills. The above property will be sold low for good paper, or on a credit from 1 to 6 years, the purchaser giving approved personal security, and a deed in trust upon the property to secure the payment of each installment separately. *personal estate for sale. If the above property is not sold by the 1st of June next, it will then be rented for a term of years, not less than 5.
John B. Nooe.
February 20, 1809.

The Virginia Herald
May 31, 1809 1:1
Pursuant to the last will and testament of the Rev. Matthew Maury, late of Albemarle county, we shall, on Friday the first day of September next, (if fair, if not, the next fair day) expose to public sale, on the premises, that valuable and highly improved farm, on which the deceased lately resided, containing between 1300 and 1400 acres. About 400 acres of this land are cleared and in excellent condition for cultivation, of which about 40 acres are very fine meadow. There is on the plantation a great variety of fruit trees, among which is a well selected apple orchard of about 200 trees in high perfection. This land is intersected by a vein of excellent lime-stone, parallel with, and 2 miles distant from the south west mountains. There are on this plantation, a large, convenient dwelling house, a large barn, stable, and all other necessary buildings in very good condition for the accommodation of a large family. The quality of this land is very good, well adapted to the growth of tobacco and corn, and particularly so to the growth of small grain and grass. It has, from experiment, been proven capable of deriving very great advantages from the use of Plaster of Paris. We will allow a credit of 1, 2, and 3 years, on the purchase money; for which we shall require a lien on the land and approved personal security. The land may be seen by application to either of us, who reside on it.
Matthew Maury, Thom. W. Maury, Albemarle County, Virginia, 1st May, 1809.

The Virginia Herald
June 24, 1809 3:3
Valuable land for sale, distant 23 miles from Georgetown and Alexandria, 19 miles from Occoquan Mills, and 20 from Dumfries, and within 21 miles of the Little River Turnpike Road. It consists of 5 and 20 hundred acres lying on the waters of Bull & Little Rockey Runs, in the counties of Fairfax and Prince William. The quality of this land is excellent and to a grazer especially, would be a source of great emolument, from the quantity of low grounds; of which there is not less than 500 acres, ready from the strength of the soil, to be sowed in timothy. This land is decidedly benefited by the plaster of paris. On it is a very good site for a mill, the stream being one of the most constant in that part of the country. There are about 500 acres in wood, heavily timbered. The improvements are a dwelling house, newly fitted up, consisting of two rooms below stairs, with a store room and two convenient closets, three lodging rooms above stairs, an excellent cellar, kitchen, corn house, meat house, and stables . Likewise the overseer's house, one in each county, with other necessary houses for negroes, &c. Between 2 and 300 acres in addition for sale, in Prince William County, on Bull Run, near its conflux with Occoquan. This land lies about 10 or 11 miles from the Occoquan Mills, and has nearly one third in woods-in quality is equal to any in its immediate neighborhood. Persons disposed to purchase may be supplied on the first named tract with a large stock of horses, cattle, sheep, hogs, farming utensils. The subscriber willing to emigrate southwardly will dispose of the above mentioned property on the most reasonable terms. Information respecting the property may be had by application to the honorable Judge Washington of Mount Vernon, M. S. Turner, esquire of Jefferson county, or in the absence of the subscriber to Bernard Hooe, Jun. Esq. living near the premises .
T. Blackburn.
Rippon Lodge, near Dumfries, Va. June 12.

The Virginia Herald
June 24, 1809 3:4
Notice.
Pursuant to the last will and testament of William Taylor, deceased, of Stafford county, I shall on the 2d Monday in August next, at Stafford Courthouse, that being court day, if fair, if not, the next fair day, expose to sale, a tract of land, on the Beaver Dam run of Aquia, containing 500 acres more or less, being the land on which he resided, and adjoining the lands of Lewis Bridwell, Mr. George, Mrs. Ford, and others. This land is in fine condition for cultivation, with a good frame dwelling house with 4 rooms below, and an excellent orchard of between 250 and 300 bearing apple trees. This land is well watered, and remarkable for its healthy situation and in curing many diseases. I will allow a credit of 12 months for the purchase money, upon the purchasers giving bond and good security to bear interest from the date if not punctually paid, and a lien on the land. Possession will be given on the 1st day of January, 1810, with the liberty of seeding this fall by permission of Mr. Presley Gill, who resides on and will shew the land to any person wishing to purchase.
William Taylor, acting executor of William Taylor, dec.
Fred'g. June 19th, 1809.

The Virginia Herald
July 19, 1809 3:3
Will be let, to the lowest bidder, at King-George Court house, on the third day of August next, (that being King George Court day) the building of a clerk's office for this county, agreeable to the dimensions and plan following, to wit: Length, 30 feet-width 20-lower story 9 and upper story 8 in the clear, of brick-a partition wall to go across the building at 10 feet from the end, to form an entry stairway above and a small lodging room below-the balance of the building below for the office room including an inside chimney, each side whereof to be cased for reception of record books, papers, &c. A similar division in the upper story is to be made with like cases by the chimney. In the whole building will be required, one outward double door, four inside panelled doors, four 15 light windows and six 12 light ditto, with outside shutters. The roof to be of wood and to be covered with tile or slate-the floor of the office room below to be laid with tile or brick, the other flooring to be of good inch and a quarter pine plank-the sill and steps of the outward door to be of stone. The rooms of the building to be plastered, & the whole work to be neatly and faithfully executed in a workman like manner. The sum of _ will be advanced to the undertaker at the time of making the contract, when bond with good security will be required for strict compliance therewith. The further sum of ?? at a certain period, and the balance of the money will be paid at the time the work shall be completed, and received agreeable to the terms of the contract. Any further explanation will be given on the day by The Commissioners.
King-George County, July 14th, 1809.

The Virginia Herald
September 6, 1809 3:4
For sale, that valuable tract of land, (called Woodville) lying within one mile of Orange courthouse, adjoining the lands of Mr. Robert Taylor, Mr. Thomas Macon, and others and containing about 470 acres: Also, a lease on about 130 acres, renewable forever, adjoining the same.-The improvements are an excellent two story framed dwelling house, 28 by 30 feet, with two rooms, a closet and a passage below, and 4 convenient lodging rooms in the second story, also a good cellar with a fire place, all brick walled, a good and commodious kitchen, a good new framed meat house, and other convenient out houses. About one half the land is cleared and in cultivation, the balance is heavily timbered with hickory, red oak, white oak, chestnut and locust. This land is remarkably well watered, and affords from 10 to 15 acres of meadow land not inferior to any in the county. Any persons wishing to purchase land in the upper country, would no doubt be pleased with this situation. The society in the neighborhood is equal to any in Virginia, and is remarkably healthy. I presume it is unnecessary to say any thing further, as any person wishing to purchase will no doubt view the premises. The subscriber living on the premises will shew the land, and make the terms known on application.
William B. Wood.
September 4th, 1809.

The Virginia Herald
September 6, 1809 3:4
For sale, A tract of land, containing about 400 acres, (100 of which is under lease to Mr. James Haiden) On the other 300 acres is a plantation in good repair, with a comfortable dwelling house, two rooms on the lower floor, and a stone chimney, a good framed barn, a small orchard of apple, peach, and cherry trees. This land lies about 6 miles from Culpeper Courthouse, on the head waters of the north branch of Cedar Run, adjoining Mr. William Payne; it is uncommonly well watered, has a large proportion of good meadow land, a part of which is now in tobacco and corn, and may be put in timothy next month; about 70 bushels of wheat may be seeded in the present cornfield and tobacco ground. A great bargain may be had in this land-I will take $8 per acre: one fourth in cash or likely young negroes, and payments of 120 pounds per annum, with interest for the balance; which last payments may be raised by an industrious frugal man from the farm. If more agreeable to the purchaser, bonds, horses, waggons, and teams will be received for all but the first payment.
Philip Slaughter.
Culpeper, August 21st, 1809.

The Virginia Herald
December 20, 1809 1:2
For sale, that beautiful and highly improved seat called Saragossa, within two miles of Alexandria, 1 a mile from the turnpike road, and 3/4 of an hour's easy ride from the City of Washington. In point of extensive prospect, salubrity of air and fine water, if Saragossa is equalled, it is certainly not surpassed by any in or out of the District. There are 195 acres, 90 of which are in wood, and the residue enclosed by a substantial post and railing. The improvements are a handsome new two story dwelling house, with one large room and passage below, and two above stairs: connected with the main dwelling house, there is a single story house with two rooms below, a store room and two garret rooms. A large and uncommonly convenient high pitched brick kitchen just finished, a handsome brick stable for 6 horses-coach house and granary, all of brick; a brick meat and pigeon-house, cow houses, &c. a large garden well paled in for the most lasting wood. There are about 10 acres in clover and the whole well adapted to the plaster of paris, as can be seen by an experiment made on the premises last summer.-To any gentleman disposed to purchase, the terms will be made unusually convenient, no more than one-tenth part of the whole amount will be required in hand, and the balance in 4 years.-Apply to the subscriber living on the premises.
Peter R. Beverley.
N.B.-Saragossa abounds in fruit trees of various kinds, selected with great care in France.
December 13

The Virginia Herald
December 20, 1809 1:2
I wish to sell the tract of land, on which I now live, situated in Orange county on the Black Walnut run, containing 236 acres, remarkably well watered throughout the tract, 100 of which is cleared and in good order for farming; about 10 acres of low ground, suited to the production of grass, and may be reclaimed at a small expense. There are few farms in the neighborhood in a higher state of improvement. The wood land is heavily timbered-the buildings are a new dwelling house, 18 by 20 feet, with a 10 foot shed; a kitchen, meat house, dairy, barn, and cornhouse.-My terms of sale will be one half, cash, the other on 12 months credit, the payment being amply secured. For further particulars apply, during my absence, to my son Ambrose Coleman, who is at present on the premises.
James Coleman.
Orange, Dec. 3d 1809.

The Virginia Herald
July 1, 1815 1:3
I wish to sell, my lot and houses in the town of Fredericksburg. The lot situated on a square bordering on the Rappahannock river, is large, convenient and healthy. The improvements are a large dwelling house with 7 good rooms, and an excellent and commodious cellar; a stable, meet house, a large cooper's shop, a good kitchen, pump, and spring house.

David Allmond Fred'g, June 23, 1815.

The Virginia Herald
July 1, 1815 1:3
Land for sale, To be sold, at Sutton's Tavern, on Wednesday the 19th day of July next, to the highest bidder, the tract of land whereon I now live, on Mattapony river, called Palestine. It is good or better than any on the river. Nearly the whole of it is low grounds, of which several hundred acres are rich meadow lands, mostly well reclaimed. The houses are in good order and sufficient to accommodate a large family. The shift now in corn is expected to produce 2000 barrels, and with some clearing the estate will afford three such. The purchaser will be allowed to sow it in wheat this fall, or I will agree to do it for him. As no person would purchase without seeing the estate, it is only necessary to add, that I live on and will shew it, and that the terms of sale on that day will be made as agreeable to the bidders as my necessities allow.

John Taylor, Jr.
Caroline, June 16th, 1815.

The Virginia Herald
July 1, 1815 4:1
A valuable farm for sale. I wish to sell my Yew-Spring Farm, containing 600 acres, lying on the Rappahannock river, 10 miles above Port-Royal and 12 below Fredericksburg-This farm possesses every advantage, both for its products and the facility of conveying them to market by water.-It is in a fine state of improvement; the soil well adapted to plaster and clover, and the situation as healthy as any in the lower country.-It is unnecessary to add more, as it is presumed that those disposed to purchase will wish to view the premises.

Samuel T. Skinker Germanna, March 3, 1815.

The Virginia Herald
July 1, 1815 4:1
Valuable property for sale. The subscriber intending to remove from this state, offers for sale the following property; which he will sell either separate or together, viz: The mill situated in Falmouth, known generally by the name of the Little Mill, (formerly owned by Mr. Dunbar.)-The site of this mill is inferior to none on Rappahannock river, being supplied with water by a canal from the river. Her present right of water is for 2 pair of 6 feet stones, which may be increased if desired-she is valuable as a grist mill, and is situated as well as could be desired for manufacturing, being in the town of Falmouth, where there is an abundant supply of wheat, and a constant market for flour: also embracing the Fredericksburg market, which is within one mile.-Nearly adjoining the mill is a new stone warehouse, 28 by 24 feet, 2 stories high be sides an excellent cellar. A small farm situated about half a mile from Falmouth, well known by the name of Richard's Hill. This farm contains about 150 acres, is well enclosed, and has on it a large and commodious dwelling house, with other necessary out houses, except a barn.-The situation is beautiful and remarkably healthy, and there is near the house a never failing spring of excellent water. There is running through the farm a small spring of water, on which is situated a large and well fixed distillery, with stills and all necessary fixtures, sufficient to make 60 to 75 gallons of whiskey per day. The distillery will be sold either with or separate from the farm, as it can be separated without injury to either. The distillery is about a quarter of a mile distant from the mill above described. Also, another farm situated about 21 miles from Falmouth, containing about 300 acres of land, with a small house, &c. on it, and a handsome young orchard; lately the residence of Mr. Edward Withers.-The terms of sale, with any further particulars will be made known by application to the subscriber, or in his absence to Mr. Wm. S. Stone, of Fredericksburg, or Mr. Geo. Murray, of Norfolk.

J. R. Triplett Fredericksburg, May 17, 1815.

The Virginia Herald
July 1, 1815 4:3
For sale, two tracts of land, In the county of Stafford, one containing 600 acres, lying on Aquia Run, (two miles above tide water) and the road leading from Aquia to Brentown, 7 miles distant from Dumfries, and 17 from Fredericksburg.-One third of this tract is cleared and produces remarkably well, the balance is heavily timbered, and rendered very valuable by its contiguity to tide water and the great demand for cord wood and building timber; the whole is well watered and in a healthy neighborhood. It will be sold together or divided as may best suit the purchaser. The other tract, containing 362 acres, lies on the head waters of Aquia Run, 16 miles from Fredericksburg and Dumfries, and adjoins the lands of Messrs. Kendal, Beatie, and others. This tract is abundantly supplied with excellent timber, well watered, and the soil admirably adapted to the culture of corn, wheat and tobacco, as well as susceptible of great improvement by the use of clover and plaster, situated in a very healthy, agreeable neighborhood. It is deemed unnecessary to say more of either, as those inclined to purchase will view the premises. Good and equitable titles will be made to both, and possession given on the first day of January next, succeeding the sale, with liberty to sow grain the preceding fall. The terms will be made known on application to Mr. Rowzee Peyton, near Aquia, or to the subscriber in Fredericksburg.

Bernard Peyton June 12th, 1815.

The Virginia Herald
July 1, 1815 4:4
A valuable farm for sale. The subscriber being inclined to remove to the western country, offers for sale the farm whereon he now lives. It adjoins the lands of Wm. Morton, Lawrence Taliaferro, and B. Hume, and contains between 4 and 500 acres, 100 acres rich low grounds, the balance fine farming land, a considerable proportion in timber, and well watered. The plaster has been used adjoining with considerable success. This farm embraces as many advantages, if not more, than any in the upper country, having on it a most valuable lime quarry, which has been worked to an advantage, and to a man who would turn his attention that way, might be very profitable; a quantity of wood immediately around the quarry. Its contiguity to market is also a valuable consideration, being only about 26 miles to Fredericksburg, agreeable to the turnpike survey, which will run within 1 or 2 miles of the farm, and will very shortly be completed that distance. There are comfortable buildings, such as a dwelling house, &c. a barn with a complete wheat machine in it.-The terms are one half in cash, the balance in negroes, good bonds, or a credit of 12 months; complete security will be required on the last payment, and an indisputable title will be given.-Possession may be had on the first January, or sooner if required, and the privilege of seeding.

Francis Taliaferro, Jun.
Orange, Virginia, April 20, 1815.

The Virginia Herald
July 1, 1815 4:4
Land & other property for sale. The subscriber having an intention of removing to a town, offers for sale the following property, viz: 800 acres of land in the county of Fauquier, on the Elk Marsh waters, near Morgan's Tavern, 25 miles from Fredericksburg. About-of this tract is cleared, the balance is pretty well timbered with oak, hickory, &c. There are 4 tenements on this land, but as their leases expire at the end of this year, of course possession can be given of the whole tract at that time.-I will take the low price of $7 per acre for this land, provided the payments are pretty good. Capt. Wm. Bower, who lives near the land, has been so kind as to promise to show it to any person wishing to purchase, and for further particulars application must be made to the subscriber in Stafford county, 6 miles from Fredericksburg, near Potomac Church. Also, a lot containing 6 acres, adjoining the town of Stevensburg, Culpeper county, which would make a handsome little meadow. Also, the land on which I reside, containing 700 acres, 400 of which are cleared, and a considerable part of the balance very well timbered with oak, poplar, &c. This soil is very productive in Indian corn, and there is little doubt, from some experiments made in the neighborhood, but that through the medium of red clover and plaster, it might be made very good wheat land. There are at least 50 acres of rich swamp on the tract well adapted to timothy, part of which is now ditched and will be sown this fall. There is a comfortable new dwelling house nearly finished, and some of the necessary out houses.-This property being situated in a genteel and agreeable neighborhood, but 6 miles from Fredericksburg, and about 2 to a landing place on Potomac Creek, and having all the supplies of fish, wild fowl, &c. without their usual companion, ague and fever, for there is not a healthier place in the country, certainly offers a desirable residence to a family. The low price of $10 will be taken for this tract, provided the payments are good. (personal estate for sale) Clear and indisputable titles shall be made to the whole of the above property. Application to be made to the subscriber.

Thomas F. Knox June 22d, 1815.

The Virginia Herald
July 5, 1815 supplement:5
Port Tobago, lately belonging to Thomas Lomax, deceased, situated upon Rappahannock river, about 5 miles below Port Royal. It contains, by estimation, about 600 acres of land, which has always been considered the best upon the river. It has the convenience of good winter and spring fisheries. Upon it is a large and excellent two story brick house with garden, orchards, and every other improvement which can be required for the comfort and convenience of a family. On the profitableness of the plantation, to any person desirous of purchasing real estate, there is hardly any tract of land in the state of Virginia so highly recommended by pleasantness of situation, fertility of soil, excellence of improvements, and its various conveniences.

John Tayloe Lomax Richmond County, Feb. 3.

The Virginia Herald
July 5, 1815 supplement:5
Land for sale. I will sell publicly, on the 21st of August next, a valuable tract of land, lying in the county of Essex, within a few miles of Tappahannock, containing 800 acres of arable land, well adapted to the cultivation of Indian corn, wheat, rye, oats, &c. A large proportion of it is heavily timbered with oak, hickory, pine and other valuable timber. It is remarkably well situated for improvement, possessing fine natural red soil, and lying very level, with a considerable quantity of fine meadow, besides a valuable portion of marsh lying within 2 miles. The improvements are a large two story dwelling house, kitchen, and other out houses in ordinary repair. The payment will be one-third cash, and the remainder in two annual installments. The purchaser to give his bond with approved security, and a deed of trust on the land to secure the payment.-Any further information that may be required can be obtained on application being made either to my brother John Waring, residing on the premises, or to myself in Fredericksburg.

E. L. Waring May 13, 1815.

The Virginia Herald
July 5, 1815 supplement:5
Valuable mills and land for sale. I wish to sell my Union Mills, in Culpeper county, Virginia, on the north branch of Rappahannock river, about 29 miles above Fredericksburg-running 2 pair of burr and a pair of country stones, with all Evan's machinery complete-These mills are in a wealthy neighborhood, and newly built, under the direction of a skillful hand, and are inferior to none in this state.-The house is well constructed, and sufficiently large to hold from 15 to 20,000 bushels of grain-adjoining which, is 450 acres of excellent farming land, on which is erected a dwelling house, kitchen, miller's house, cooper's shop, &c. &c. Also, my Raccoon Mills, situated in Orange county, about 30 miles above Fredericksburg, running 1 pair 6 feet burr and 1 pair country stones, with machinery, and a cotton and wool carding machine complete-adjoining this mill is a 4 acre lot, on which is a convenient dwelling house, &c. newly built, and on the opposite side of the river, is erected a saw mill, near which is 450 acres of land, heavily timbered.-Those mills are in good repair, and also in a wealthy neighborhood, and possess many advantages, having at all times a super abundance of water.-The terms of sale will be made easy.

John Alcocke Union Mills, 29th May, 1815.

The Virginia Herald
July 8, 1815 1:2
For sale, The farm whereon I now reside, late the residence of Col. George Brent, deceased, contains near 700 acres, a full proportion of which is standing in woods for support. The improvements, tho' not elegant, are spacious, comfortable and convenient, with a large barn and every other out houses requisite. Attached to this estate is a valuable mill seat near the tobacco warehouses and town of Woodstock, a stand inferior to none for mercantile business, being at the head of the water. There are few farms more productive, as a considerable proportion of it is rich low grounds, in arable order-immediately upon Aquia creek is about 12 acres of timothy meadow, and a much larger quantity might be added with inconsiderable expense. From its eligible situation and productive soil, I am of opinion the land would best recommend itself, and a minute description thought unnecessary-Half the purchase money being paid, a considerable indulgence would be given for the balance. Possession, &c. at the end of the year. For terms apply to
W. P. Bayly Woodstock, Stafford County, June 27, 1815.

The Virginia Herald
July 12, 1815 3:4
I wish to sell or rent, My house in which I reside, together with the entire lot, being 242 feet fronting on Caroline street, and extending back to Princess Ann street. The dwelling house is two stories, built in the most convenient and comfortable manner, and is as eligible a stand for mercantile business as any in Fredericksburg. On the lot are all the necessary out houses for the accommodation of a family. Any further description is deemed unnecessary. The terms made known on application to
James S. Drinan July 11th, 1815.

The Virginia Herald
July 15, 1815 3:4
For sale, That valuable and fertile tract of land in Westmoreland county, called Smith's Mount. This tract is bounded on one side by the Rappahannock river, and lies about 3 miles below Leedstown; it contains about 1600 acres, 1/3 of which is covered with heavy timber of the first quality; it also abounds with red cedar. The cleared land is well adapted to Indian corn and small grain, and in general it is equal in quality to any on the river on which it lies. The dwelling house is in tolerable repair, and at no great expense may be made comfortable, commodious and pleasant. The out houses are large, convenient, and in every respect sufficient for the purposes of the farm. It is presumed that it would be necessary to be more particularly descriptive to any one who may be inclined to purchase, as in such case the land itself would be viewed. The land will be shown by Mr. Daniel Payne, the present occupant; and the terms of sale may be known on application to the subscriber.

Battaile Fitzhugh Flintshire, near Carson's Ferry, Caroline County.
May 30, 1815.

The Virginia Herald
July 15, 1815 3:4
An object, interesting and truly desirable!!! The undersigned, proprietor of the premises, is disposed to lease, by private contract, from 1 to 7 years, to commence from and after the end of the present year, that valuable and well known plantation, with its appurtenances, called Crondall, situated in the county of Richmond, upon the Rappahannock river-adjoining Mount Airy, the estate of John Tayloe, esq. and also of Landon Carter, esq. and which is immediately opposite the town of Tappahannock, sometimes called "Hobbs-Hole" and which said tract contains about 2000 acres.-Its width is more than a mile, and extends up and down the said river, including a valuable public ferry-the road to which passes through the premises. This land is uncommonly level and fertile, and is peculiarly well adapted to the culture of corn, wheat, tobacco, oats, and clover, with a natural meadow producing abundant crops of excellent hay-as a grazing farm, few, if any, in this state excel it. The navigation of this river is easy and certain at all seasons, and admits vessels of the largest size; by means thereof the produce of the farm can be readily and at a trivial expense shipped up or down the said river, as the interest of the tenant may dictate. This place abounds with fish, crabs, and wild fowl of the first quality; united to it, a sand bar well adapted to the use of a seine, from which great advantages with certainty be anticipated. As to society, it is doubtful whether any neighborhood in the country affords better or greater wealth-additionally, there is an advantage, by no means of slight consideration, that is, the public mail passes this ferry, and from its situation, great profit may certainly be delivered, by the establishment of a public house of entertainment. Upon this farm there are excellent improvements, but which are out of repair, and in this respect the subscriber is disposed to be liberal as to the terms of lease, in order to get them in a complete state of repair. It cannot be needful to say any thing more of this estate-to those who know it, what has been said is unnecessary, as they are prepared to appreciate its real value-to those who are not acquainted with it, their time may not be improvidently spent, in taking a view of its peculiar advantages. Any letters addressed to me at this place, shall be punctually attended to.

John Murphy, Jun'r.
Richmond, July 1.

The Virginia Herald
July 22, 1815 3:5
I wish to rent, for 1, 2, or 3 years, the following property, belonging to the estate of the late Caleb Smith, deceased, viz: The tract of land called Marengo, whereon he resided at the time of his death, lying on Rozier's creek and Potomac river, containing about 750 acres, divided into 3 fields, (besides a standing pasture) one of which is now in corn, and may be seeded in wheat this fall. On the land is a large and convenient two story dwelling house, with all necessary out houses, orchards, gardens, &c. Also, the property at Mellville, consisting of a new store-house, blacksmith's shop, and a newly rebuilt overshot grist mill, with two pair of stones, on a never failing stream, having thereon a cotton picking machine of the best quality-This mill is situated in a wealthy neighborhood, affording an abundance of grist, besides the Maryland custom, which is considerable, the mill being at the head of tide water on Rozier's creek. Also, the tract of land at present occupied by William Coakley, situated within 3 miles of the courthouse of this county, containing upwards of 1500 acres, divided into 4 fields. On this land is a house so well known as a tavern, and now kept by said Coakley.-Also, one other grist mill situated within 2 miles of the last mentioned tract, containing 2 pair of stones, on a good stream, and lately rebuilt in the best manner as an overshot, with brick walls, &c. having therein also a cotton picking machine. Adjoining this mill is a tract of about 150 acres of good forest land, which may be rented with or without the mill. The subscriber will rent the whole or any part of the above property at a bargain to any person disposed to take it, till the 15th of next month, on which day, if not sooner disposed of, he will rent Marengo and the Mellville property to the highest bidder at Mellville-and on Wednesday the 16th, will rent at William Coakley's that property and the mill adjoining.

Austin Smith, Administrator of Caleb Smith, dec'd.
King George County, July 21, 1815.

The Virginia Herald
July 29, 1815 3:5
Valuable lands for sale. One tract known by the name of Springfield, lying in Northumberland County, near the court-house thereof, and is adjacent to the well known river Coan. Upon this tract of land there is a commodious dwelling house susceptible of repair, about half a mile from the court-house-another, with two rooms upon a floor, adjoining which is a store house and an excellent garden. It has also a quantity of excellent timber suitable for the Alexandria and Washington markets, immediately adjacent to navigation-Its situation is perfectly healthy, and productive of the greatest quantity of Fish, oysters, crabs, and wild fowl, and is well calculated for improvements-indeed it may be said to be inferior to no farm in the northern neck for these conveniences, containing about 612 acres. Two other tracts of land in the county of Richmond, one in the parish of Lunenburg, within 2 miles of the court-house, all level and heavily timbered, without improvements-The other lying in the fork of Totuskey, in North-Farnham Parish, improved with a convenient dwelling, and other houses suitable for the accommodation of a small family, well timbered, and under two good fences, containing 180 acres.-In this tract a great bargain may be had. Those who wish to become purchasers will apply in my absence to Mr. George Saunders. of Farnham Church, for terms and the necessary contracts.
Foushee G. Tebbs Richmond County, July 18, 1815.

The Virginia Herald
August 2, 1815 3:5
An improved farm for sale. The subscriber offers for sale the farm on which he resides in the county of Culpeper, containing about 1200 acres. The quality of the land which is naturally good, has been improved by the culture of clover and the use of plaster of Paris, to which it is admirely adapted. Upwards of 700 acres are under cultivation, divided into convenient fields; the remainder is in wood, and well stocked with valuable timber. The buildings consist of a handsome & convenient dwelling house, with several spacious offices, are well calculated for the comfortable accommodation of a large family: and other improvements, such as farm houses (including a very good wheat machine) gardens, orchards, meadows, and grazing grounds, combine many objects of utility, ornament and profit. Never-failing springs and streams afford an ample supply of the purest water to every part of the land; and whether it is treated as a grain or grazing farm, with ordinary care, it would be highly profitable. Situated within 22 miles of the court-house, it admits all the benefits to be derived from healthiness of climate and good society-250 acres of corn and fallow land may be sown in wheat the ensuing autumn and entire possession had in the fall.-The tract would admit of two or three unequal divisions, if most suitable to purchasers.-The terms which will be made accommodating, may be known of the proprietor, on the premises, or of John McNeale, esq. who lives adjacent.

Phil. R. Thompson Culpeper, July 31, 1815.

The Virginia Herald
September 2, 1815 3:5
Land for sale. The subscriber being desirous to move to the western country, will sell his farm in King George county, within 2 miles of the Rappahannock river, containing 1600 acres of good forest farming land, well adapted to the cultivation of corn, wheat, tobacco and clover; there are 100 acres of good meadow land now fit for grass, and at least 2/3 of the tract is in woods. The improvements are a large dwelling house and all other necessary out houses (that might at a small expense be put in good repair) with large orchards of good fruit.-The terms, which will be made accommodating, may be known by application to the proprietor, or Mr. David T. Chevis, who will shew the land-
Francis Thornton August 18, 1815.

The Virginia Herald
September 6, 1815 3:5
To rent The Broadfield Store-houses, consisting of a store-house, counting-room, and bail house, in good repair; together with the dwelling houses and farm, consisting of about 400 acres of excellent farming land; for the next year, or a term of years; and possession to be delivered the first day of January next, either together or separately, as may suit persons inclined to rent. The above property is situated in the county of Westmoreland, near Mattox Bridge, on the main road leading from King George Court-house and Hooe's Ferry, to Mattox Bridge and Westmoreland court-house.

Townsend S. Dade September 4, 1815.

The Virginia Herald
September 6, 1815 3:5
Land for sale. Will be sold to the highest bidder, at the Wilderness Tavern, on Thursday the 21st September next, a tract of land, lying in Culpeper county, on the Rappahannock river, three miles from the Wilderness Tavern in Orange, and about the same distance below Germanna, and 21 miles from the town of Fredericksburg. This tract contains upwards of 500 acres, about 70 of which is low ground, the balance is considered as good as any land in the neighborhood and about 200 acres are heavily timbered with oak and pine. There is a tolerable comfortable dwelling house, a good dairy and meat-house upon the land. At the same time and place will be offered, two other small tracts, containing 100 acres each, one adjoining the above tract, the other about one mile distant. They are both under a lease at present, and pay a tobacco rent. The leases, if required may be bought on good terms. The one in the occupancy of Mr. Smith, he has only a life estate on. The sale will be made for one third of the purchase money in hand, and the residue in two annual installments. Liberty to sow wheat will be given the first of October and possession may be had the first of January next.

John B. Nooe, Only surviving Executor of Bazil Nooe, dec'd.
30th August, 1815.

The Virginia Herald
September 13, 1815 3:4
Rappahannock land for sale. The subscriber will sell 500 acres adjoining the tract on which he lives-2/3 of this land is level, and 3/4 or more in wood-a considerable part well timbered The lower part of the tract is about a mile and a half from the river, the upper part about 8 miles from Fredericksburg-the soil is good for both corn and wheat, and a small stream, which runs from one end of the tract almost to the other, affords a considerable quantity of meadow land. On this stream a small mill has formerly been erected, which it is believed might be made advantageous to the farm. The mill house is an excellent framed house, in which there is an exceeding good pair of stones. There is a high and healthy situation on the tract, which, when the land is cleared will afford a beautiful view of the flat grounds on both sides of the river for a considerable distance. This land, when cleared, would make a beautiful and productive farm; and it is supposed the wood and timber might be turned to good account, by carting it to the river, to which there is a good road and landing, and boating it to Fredericksburg; nor is the distance too great to waggon it advantageously to town. About 50 acres of the tract have been cleared, and never exhausted, and might with a little labour be again brought into cultivation. There are other detached pieces of cleared land in some degree of improvement.-For terms apply to the subscriber.

Lawrence Battaile Prospect Hill, Sept. 11, 1815.

The Virginia Herald
September 23, 1815 3:5
For sale, A tract of valuable land, containing 450 3/4 acres, within 5 miles of Culpeper Court-house, adjoining Mr. Robert Hay and Mr. John R. Dade. This land is uncommonly well watered, has a full proportion of timber and meadow land, a part of the latter now in timothy and a part in tobacco-100 bushels of wheat may be seeded this fall to advantage. There is a new dwelling house with two rooms on the lower floor and a good stone chimney at each end-a new and excellent framed meat-house, a good barn lately built, &c.-The situation healthy and pleasant, with a good spring at the edge of the yard. A great bargain may be had, and possession given at the end of this year, with leave to seed wheat immediately.

Philip Slaughter Springfield, Culpeper County, September 16, 1815.

The Virginia Herald
September 27, 1815 3:4
The subscriber having removed to Richmond, will sell on liberal and accommodating terms, the plantation whereon he lately resided, lying about a mile and a half from Westmoreland Court-house, and containing 420 acres of land of good quality, on which there is a new well finished and comfortable dwelling house, office, and other necessary out houses. The place is extremely well watered, as healthy as any in the lower country, and offers many and peculiar advantages to professional gentlemen. Any person especially desirous of establishing himself in the practice of law or medicine, would do well to view the premises, which will be shewn by Mr. Wm. Steerman, at Westmoreland Court-house, who will also make known the terms of sale.

Richard Y. Parker September 26, 1815.

The Virginia Herald
October 11, 1815 3:5
Will be sold, To the highest bidder, at 12 o'clock, on Friday the 20th instant, on the premises, the houses and lot at present occupied by the subscriber, at the upper end of the main street, near the Eagle Tavern, consisting of a store with a dry cellar, a commodious dwelling house and kitchen, stable, coach-house, granary, and other necessary out houses, all in good repair. The lot extends from Caroline back to Princess Ann street. The stand has been long occupied as a grocery, and is in a very advantageous situation for that business.-Terms of sale will be $1000 in hand, and negotiable notes with good endorsers for the remainder; one half payable the first day of May next, and the other half 12 months thereafter.

George Garnett Fredericksburg, October 9, 1815.

The Virginia Herald
November 22, 1815 3:4
George Cox, intending to remove to the state of Kentucky, wishes to dispose of the house and lot where he now resides, in the main street, opposite the Market Square, Fredericksburg; and will expose the said property for sale to the highest bidder on Monday the 1st of January next, in front of the premises. The house is new, substantially built of brick, two stories high, covered with slate, with a large and convenient brick kitchen and smoke-house, all well calculated for the accommodation of a genteel family. The lot is airy and open, running through the square to Water street, and the situation for business equal to any in town. Terms of sale-One third of the purchase money to be paid in April next, when possession will be given; one third in 6 months and the remainder in 12 months thereafter.

A. Buck, Auctioneer November 21.

The Virginia Herald
December 6, 1815 3:3
For sale, Two tracts of land, lying in Orange and Culpeper counties, on the Rapidan river, 12 miles from Orange court-house, 9 miles from Culpeper court-house, 28 from Fredericksburg, convenient to the turnpike, containing 300 acres in each tract, 1 miles distant from each other, adjoining a grist mill and saw mill, tan yard, &c. and in the vicinity of a nest of merchant mills. On the Orange farm is nearly 100 acres of low grounds, inferior to none on the river, 60 acres well timbered, and the whole well adapted to the culture of wheat, corn, and tobacco; pleasantly situated, with good water, a dwelling house, and every other house necessary. The Culpeper farm, one forth cleared, and the balance well timbered, excellent for corn, wheat, grass, &c. One half the money will be required in hand, the balance made easy to the purchaser.

John Porter Fair Hill, Nov. 22, 1815.

The Virginia Herald
December 16, 1815 3:4
Valuable land. With a view of settling in Kentucky, I am disposed to sell the valuable farm on which I reside, containing 416 acres, and lying within 10 miles of Fredericksburg. Half of the tract stands in wood. Half of that which is cleared quite fresh; the other half produces well, as will be seen by viewing it. A large proportion of meadow may be had without clearing the timbered land, and it may safely be said, that no tract of equal size in this part of the country contains as little unprofitable land. The improvements are a dwelling house 24 by 26 feet, kitchen, meat-house, dairy, corn-house, school-house, and lumber-house; with a handsome young apple orchard, already bearing well. There is an excellent spring very near the house. Contiguous to this land, a valuable merchant mill and several grist mills. The society is agreeable, and no prospect other than that of a settlement in the western country would induce me to remove.

Addison M. Lewis Spotsylvania, Dec. 16, 1815.

The Virginia Herald
December 16, 1815 3:5
From various cause, growing out of a long state of illness, and also an earnest desire to pay all my debts, I offer for sale the following tracts of land in Orange County: The one lying on the turnpike road leading from Fredericksburg to Orange Court House, and directly in the centre between the two places, being a most excellent place for a public stand, and containing about 300 acres of land, nearly the whole of which is well timbered, a small quantity only being cleared. The improvements are few, among which is a well of excellent water, having been completed last fall, with an intention of building there; also about 400 young apple trees from Strachman's nursery, just beginning to bear. There is an excellent situation for a distillery and tannery on the above place. Also, the place whereon I now live, and about one mile from the former, containing about the same quantity of acres. The improvements are a common dwelling house, about 60 feet long, stone chimneys, fire places, below and above stairs, and other out houses, with an excellent orchard, and springs in abundance of never failing water. A great quantity of the above land is well calculated for timothy, and is also well adapted to clover and plaster. There is now sown on the place about 60 bushels of wheat, leaving a most excellent shift for a crop of corn the next year, and a large pasture under good fencing, which may easily be made a third shift. The whole of which I am desirous to sell, and will make the payments easy. Any person wishing to purchase will be shewn the lands by applying to the subscriber on the premises.

James W. Hawkins Dec. 10

The Virginia Herald
December 28, 1815 1:2
For sale, The house and lot on which I reside in the town of Stanardsville (Va) containing half an acre. The house well calculated for a public house, and is at this time kept by means such. The dwelling house is in front 30 feet, by 20 feet in depth, with a wing 20 feet square, shed and porch at the end of the front part and side of the wing near 50 feet in length, and a porch in front 40 feet long, kitchen equal to 25 feet square, stable and granary 80 feet in length by 17 in depth, the greater part shedded-and an excellent ice house, the best I ever saw for keeping ice. It is considered among the best stands for a public house in the upper country; it is immediately on the road leading from Fredericksburg to the Swift Run Gap, within 8 miles of the top of the Blue Ridge, and 2 miles from the foot of the turnpike road leading through said Gap, which the Swift Run Turnpike is by law to meet; of course the Swift Run Turnpike must run through the town of Stanardsville. For the terms apply to the subscriber, who will at any time be found on the premises.

Thomas Sorrille Dec. 19.

The Virginia Herald
January 19, 1816 3:4
Land for sale. One tract, containing by recent survey, 881 acres, situated in the county of Stafford and state of Virginia, about 4 miles below Fredericksburg, and a mile and a half below Potomac creek. This land is not in a state of best improvement, but the soil is originally good; it has a considerable quantity of meadow, and an abundance of timber and wood for all the purposes of farming upon such a tract.-The soil is alike adapted to the growth of corn, wheat and tobacco-It is free from the diseases which usually accompany tide water. Mr. William Hewitt, who resides on the premises, will shew it to any person wishing to purchase. It will be sold a great bargain, if application be made at an early day. The tract will be divided to suit purchasers. Also, one other tract, situated in the county of Stafford, about 12 miles above Falmouth and 7 from Aquia, in the neighborhood of Rock Hill Meeting House, containing about 150 acres, upon which there is a good dwelling house for a small family, containing 2 rooms and a passage below and two above-with all necessary out houses. The country is high, pleasant, and healthy, and the neighborhood good.-Those wishing to purchase will apply to
J. W. Hewitt.
Dumfries, Va. January 15.

The Virginia Herald
January 27, 1816 3:4
The subscriber being anxious to retire from public business, offers for sale his tavern and lots in the town of Fairfax, generally called Culpeper court-house, to wit:-One half acre front lot, and one half acre back lot adjoining. There is on this premises a large two story house, 100 feet long, with 4 rooms on the first floor, with fire places in each of them, and so constructed that the front room may be occupied as a public bar room without interfering with the other rooms, with a portico in front of it 40 feet long and 10 feet wide; the other 3 rooms adjoin to the back of the front room, with a portico on one side of them, 70 feet long and 15 feet wide, two of these rooms may be made one by opening a folding partition, which will make a large dining room. There is on the second floor 7 handsome lodging rooms, which are divided into 3 separate apartments by 3 separate stair cases, with fire places in 5 of them, so that travelers or others may be well accommodated with lodging room. There are 4 cellar rooms, with fire places in two of them. There is also a good kitchen, meat-house, ice-house, and a well of excellent water within 15 steps of the house-besides a number of other conveniences. The house stands in one corner of the front lot, which gives it the advantage of the main street in front, and a cross street on one side. There are stables with 60 stalls, besides several out stables, and a house in the stable yard to hold grain, and about one quarter of an acre back of the stables well set with clover and orchard grass.-There is likewise a garden well enclosed, 70 feet wide and upwards of 250 feet long, handsomely laid out in squares and walks, and very productive, and at this time there are several kinds of small fruit in it that are usually cultivated in gardens, besides fruit trees of different kinds. There are held at this place two superior courts annually, the first Mondays in April and September, which set several days each; 4 quarterly terms, the third Monday in March, May, August, and November, which generally set 4 days each, and sometimes all the week, and 8 monthly courts, the third Mondays in every month, except the quarterly terms, which set two days each; besides a number of other public days, and a great many travelers passing through this place in the course of a year, together with the improvements, will make it worthy of the attention of any person desirous of keeping a house of public entertainment. Any person wishing to purchase the property may have a great bargain in it. Part of the purchase money must be paid in hand, and the remainder in 1, 2, 3 and 4 years, on giving bond and security, and a deed of trust on the property to secure the payment. A good title will be made and possession given in May next, if required.

Benjamin Shackelford.
Culpeper Court-house, January 25, 1816.

The Virginia Herald
January 31, 1816 3:5
Valuable property for sale or to rent. The house and lot where I now reside in the town of Fredericksburg. The dwelling house contains 4 rooms below stairs: the drawing room is 28 by 26 feet, dining room 21 by 20, and two smaller rooms; one is a chamber and the other is a nursery. The passage in front is spacious, and the cross passage leading to the dining room 10 feet wide. There are three good separate cellars; two of which have fire places. Above stairs are 4 rooms with fire places and two without. The kitchen is built of brick, and under the same roof is a laundry and pantry, with three convenient rooms above stairs. There is also a good meat-house; and on the part of the lot which fronts on Water-street is a large stable, with stalls for 4 horses and room for 6000 wt. of hay, a carriage house, &c. And, nearly adjoining is a comfortable dwelling house, with two rooms down stairs and two above; and at the corner formed by the intersection of Water-street with Frederick street is another building, which could easily be converted into a stable or warehouse. This lot fronts on three streets, extending from Caroline street to Water Street.-The garden is large and in a high state of cultivation. Also for sale, the house and lot at present occupied by Captain Towles, and lately by Mr. Victor, fronting on Caroline and Prussia streets: likewise the adjoining lot, fronting on Princess Ann street and Prussia streets containing 2 tenements. Also, the house and lot in the occupancy of Captain Williams, at the lower end of town: the house is two stories high, has two rooms below and two above stairs, with a spacious garret. There is a good garden and every other convenience to make this a comfortable residence for a small family. Also, several other lots of ground, adjoining that property, extending from Caroline street to the river; whereon house, warehouse, and wharves may be had. Also, one other lot, adjoining the property of Mrs. Fry, being part of the old brewery lot. Also, about 17 acres of land lying on Hazel Run, near the lower end of town, and adjoining the lands of Joseph Christy and Byrd C. Willis, esquires. On this land there is a dwelling house, which might be made at a small expense, a tolerable good one for a small family. In its present state it rents for 18 per annum. Part of this land is suitable for the cultivation of every kind of vegetable, and with industry a handsome living might be made in that line of business: the rest of the land produces great clover and timothy. I will also rent of sell any part of my lands near Corbin's bridges, which are not tenanted out, containing about 1700 acres.-Part of these lands are well worth the attention of an industrious men, as there are between 2 and 300 acres which might be made good meadow, and not more than 5 miles distant from the turnpike road-about 14 years ago, I refused 80 per annum rent for 351 acres of this tract. The high lands are as good as any in the neighborhood, and well adapted to the cultivation of corn, wheat or tobacco. There is the greatest plenty of excellent timber and wood, and good water on every part. That part of the tract formerly called Olive's affords on of the best situations for a country tavern, being immediately on the cross roads leading from Fredericksburg to Orange Court house and Louisa county; there is a good peach orchard, from which I have been informed, the former tenant has made 80 or 100 gallons of brandy in a year. Also for sale, my lands in the counties of Greenbriar and Bath, Virginia, and those on Green River in Kentucky. The terms of sale will be, a small part of the purchase money to be paid down in cash, stock of the United States, or either of the Virginia Banks; and for the balance a liberal credit will be given, on the purchasers granting their bonds and security, with interest from the day of sale, and a pledge on the premises. Further particulars may be had by personal application or by letter to me in Fredericksburg.

Geo. French January 31.

The Virginia Herald
February 3, 1816 3:5
A great bargain. From 280 to 600 acres of land, lying on the main road, leading from Chester's Gap, and about 10 miles above the former place. The soil is particularly adapted to clover and plaster, and susceptible of all agricultural improvements. The above land will admit of two tenements, there being a comfortable dwelling house and out houses on each end of the land.-Good orchards and gardens, and 30 or 40 acres of prime meadow ground on each tenement.-Its proximity to Falmouth and Fredericksburg, with its great salubrity of water and air, would render it a desirable retreat for town gentlemen in the fall season. For terms apply to
George M. Parsons, Robert Hume.
Falmouth, Feb. 3.

The Virginia Herald
February 7, 1816 3:4
Land for sale. The subscriber offers for sale, 500 acres of land, in the county of Prince William--There is on the land an excellent dwelling house just built, with two rooms 16 by 18 feet on the first floor, and a passage 10 feet between--and two rooms and entry above. The land is within 12 miles of Dickinson's Springs, and well timbered except about 150 acres which is arable--Persons disposed to view the land will call on P. Alexander, or James L. Harrison, near the premises, who will inform them of the terms of sale--Possession given immediately of one half the land on which the house is situated, the balance in all the month of September next.

B. Harrison.
February 7.

The Virginia Herald
February 10, 1816 3:5
For sale, My saw-mill tract of land, situated on the lower end of Orange county, containing about 1200 acres. 5 or 600 acres of this land is of good quality for tillage, and lies well; the remainder contains a quantity of good pine fit for the use of the saw mill. There runs through the lower end of the tract, a stream that will afford water for a saw and grist mill at least 9 months in the year, and an excellent site for their erection. This property is distant 17 miles from Fredericksburg, and from the Wilderness tavern about 2 miles. From thence to Fredericksburg is a good turnpike, where there is always a ready sale for plank. The land also contains a considerable quantity of good oak timber, fit for barrels, which meets with a ready sale immediately in the neighborhood. A further description is unnecessary, as any person wishing to purchase will endeavor to make himself acquainted with the property. For terms, application may be made to me, living one and a half miles from the Wilderness Tavern, or to Mr. Robert Patton of Fredericksburg.

John Spotswood, Orange county, Feb. 9, 1816.

The Virginia Herald
February 24, 1816 3:4
For sale. That beautiful situation, South Hill, containing 107 acres of land, upwards of 100 acres of which is of the first qualitied Potomac low grounds. The latter is laid off into 3 equal fields, and having been constantly enclosed, and but little grazed, has been for the last 14 years in a progressive state of improvement. This land is peculiarly adapted to the growth of corn, wheat and tobacco. The improvements are a new and well finished two story dwelling house, upwards of 60 feet long, with 6 rooms and 7 closets, and a passage through the middle of the house 32 feet long; three large rooms in the cellar, which is the size of the house, one of them with a large fire place and 4 glass windows, and sufficiently comfortable for any purpose. Also, a granary, two stories high, with sheds and stalls around it for the accommodation of 11 horses: also a carriage and gig house, ice house, kitchen, and all other necessary out houses. There is attached to this farm one of the most convenient landings on the Machodock, together with a shad fishery. Also, a fine orchard of the most select fruits. South Hill affords a prospect, for beauty and variety, equal if not superior to any in Virginia. From the front you overlook a wide extended tract of level, fertile and highly cultivated low grounds, and the eye cannot reach the extent of water prospect. The situation is high and healthful. About one mile from this place I will sell 400 acres of land, being a part of the Union tract, which will include the buildings. The dwelling house, which a few years ago was thoroughly repaired, and now almost as good as new, is sufficiently commodious for a family. There is also a new kitchen, a very large granary, ice house, and all other necessary out houses. This tract, which from its contiguity to navigation, can scarcely come under the denomination of forest land, is inferior to none in the neighborhood for corn, and inferior to only the best low grounds for wheat. It abounds in timber and wood of every description; and upon it are several never failing springs of fine water. A more minute description of the above property would be unnecessary, as I presume any person wishing to purchase would wish to view the premises. For terms apply to
John H. Washington.
South-Hill, King George County, February 23, 1816.

The Virginia Herald
May 18, 1816 3:4
Valuable property for sale. Will be sold to the highest bidder on the premises, on Thursday the 20th day of June, the Union Mills, situated on the north branch of Rappahannock river, in the county of Culpeper, about 28 miles above Fredericksburg, and 12 miles below Norman's Ford, running 2 pair of 6 feet burr stones, and a pair of country stones, with Evan's machinery complete.-Also, a tract of land containing 400 acres, on which there is a dwelling house and other buildings. And on Saturday the 22d day of June, on the premises, one other mill, situate in orange county, about 30 miles above Fredericksburg on the south branch of Rappahannock, running one pair of 6 feet burr stones, and a pair of country stones, with Evan's machinery,and a wool carding machine, complete; with a valuable saw mill on the opposite side of the river. Attached to this property are two lots of ground containing about 6 acres, on which are a dwelling house, and other buildings, and near it 450 acres of wood land, heavily timbered with pine and oak. Both of these mills are in fine wheat neighborhoods, and commanding ion the driest seasons an abundance of water. The terms will be made accommodating. A private sale would be preferred, in which event due notice will be given.

John Alcocke.
Union Mills, Culpeper, May 18.

The Virginia Herald
May 18, 1816 3:5
For sale, A valuable tract of land, about 1277 acres, in the county of Middlesex, with a grist mill newly built, and a new pair of stones. The tide of the Rappahannock flows to the mill till, and affords access to fish, oysters, &c. This land is generally level, adapted to grain or tobacco, is well timbered, has good water, comfortable improvements, an apple orchard of choice fruit, a fine range for stock; it is about 7 miles from the court house in the town of Urbanna, in a genteel neighborhood, and if longevity is a test of salubrity, there is not perhaps a healthier spot in the state. Stock at the current prices, or notes of any approved bank in the District of Columbia will be received at par. Possession may be had immediately. For further particulars apply to John Scott, Fredericksburg, or to
Francis Corbin, Reeds, Caroline County, May 18.

The Virginia Herald
May 25, 1816 3:3
Land for sale. If not sold at private bargain previous to Friday the 28th day of June, will on that day be offered on the premises, to the highest bidder, the tract of land, whereon I reside, in Stafford county, lying on Cannon's Run, containing between 3 and 400 acres; one third of which is in wood, and heavily timbered. The improvements consisting of a neat and commodious dwelling house, 38 feet by 18, with two rooms on a floor, a passage above and below; the chimnies brick, with a fire place in each room, with a cellar under the whole building; the kitchen and meat-house entirely new, a well finished spring-house situated in yard, with a never failing spring of pleasant and delightful water; the garden spacious, productive, and handsomely laid off, and from its site eminently calculated to receive additional improvement.-There are upwards of 100 apple trees of well selected fruit, planted near the house, beginning to bear, and an orchard situated in a different part of the plantation of various kinds of fruit. Few situations combine greater advantages, from its healthiness, being 3 miles from the Stafford Springs. Its proximity and central situation, being 18 miles from Falmouth, 16 from Dumfries, and 20 from Fredericksburg. The soil of this land is well adapted to culture of corn, wheat, and tobacco; but particularly to the growth of timothy, and with a small degree of labor, there can be from 40 to 50 acres of land immediately converted into meadow. The different fields are plentifully supplied with water. From experiments made in the neighborhood, I am well convinced this land is well adapted to the clover and plaster system of agriculture.-Terms of sale, two-thirds of the purchase money paid in hand, the balance in 12 months-Bond with a deed of trust, to secure the payment thereof will be required-An indisputable title will be made to the purchaser and possession given the first of January, 1817.

Thomas Stocke.
Oakhampton, (Stafford) May 25, 1816.

The Virginia Herald
May 25, 1816 3:4
Land for sale. The subscriber offers for sale, the farm on which he resides, situated on Cedar Run, in the county of Prince William, containing 600 acres. Nearly half of this land is in wood and heavily timbered; the cleared land is divided into four fields, under good inclosures; a considerable proportion has been much improved, and about 60 acres recently cleared. The low grounds are good and seldom overflow so as to injure the crop. The land is well adapted to grass, and it is believed might be made profitable as a grazing farm. There is a large young apple orchard of the most select kind of apples, just beginning to bear.-The improvements are a dwelling house, 36 feet by 18, nearly finished and all necessary out houses. The water is good and convenient to the house. This farm is situated in a healthy and genteel neighborhood, 18 miles from Dumfries, 20 from the Occoquan Mills, and 35 from Alexandria. One third of the purchase money will be required on giving possession, the balance in two equal annual installments, with interest from the date, to be secured by a lien on the premises.

Francis T. Fitzhugh.
Prince William County, May 25, 1816.

The Virginia Herald
June 5, 1816 3:3
For sale. Having determined to remove from this place at the end of the present year, I offer for sale the following property: lst. The houses and lots now occupied by me in this place as a tavern. The dwelling house is large and roomy, and may at a small expense be rendered much more so. It is now the only public house in the town, and there is no danger in rivalship. Adjoining the tavern is a brick house with 4 rooms and a back portico the whole length of the house. This house may be used as a private apartment for a family, or converted into a store-house, counting room, &c.-There are good dry cellars under every part of the building. Upon the lot are two stables which would hold about 20 horses; the largest of them fitted up in good stile; a carriage house is attached to one of the stables; the garden is large and fruitful. The stand is now a valuable one, but might be rendered much more so by a person who would keep a store, for which the supply of groceries and other things for the tavern use might be drawn at the wholesale prices. The receipts into the tavern will not be short of $7000 per annum, as can be shewn by the proprietor's books, which he has kept with much exactness. 2dly. A small tract of land not more than 22 miles from the town, containing 130 acres. Many advantages would result to the person who buys the tavern property, by owning the land also; he would be enabled to draw his supply of fuel, of which there is an abundance; about 10 acres are swamp, already reclaimed, which would furnish a sufficiency of hay for the use of the tavern; the cleared land might be laid out into lots for the purpose of raising wheat, clover, & other things of value. To a publican these lots might be with much ease made extremely fertile and productive, by carrying out the manure from the stables in the return waggons that bring in wood for the use of the house. 3dly. One half of an extensive tan-yard, very near the town, with 2 acres of land attached to it. and lastly, one half of a large and well constructed store-house, a large warehouse, a granary, kitchen, stable, &c. well situated in the town. I will sell the whole or any part of this property by private bargain. Should it not be disposed of in that way before the 18th day of July next, it will then be set up to the highest bidder, and the sale to continue until the whole is sold. As the proprietor is determined to make a sale, the terms will be liberal, and no part of the purchase money will be required until a good title is made. The property will be shown and the terms made known, on application to
Thomas Miller.
Port Royal, June 5, 1816.

The Virginia Herald
June 8, 1816 3:4
For sale, 518 acres of land, lying in Culpeper county, through which the turnpike road runs about 3/4 of a mile and within one mile of the Turnpike Mills, owned by Britton and Harbee, at Thornton's gap. This land is well watered and perhaps better timbered than any land within some miles thereof. There is a great quantity of chestnut and oak timber, which is in great demand for shingles and staves, and not more than 50 acres of it cleared. There are convenient buildings on it, and a constant stream of water running through it, which would be sufficient for light water-works. A great bargain would be given in said land, on immediate application to the subscriber, as she intends moving to the western country early this fall. Possession will be given in time to seed.

Lucy Menesee.
June 8

The Virginia Herald
June 29, 1816 1:1
For sale, 323 acres of land, in Lancaster County, adjoining and nearly surrounding the Court-house bounds, including 30 acres of excellent marsh, affording hay for a large stock of cattle, and wild fowl in their season; a convenient landing for oysters and fish, and a sufficiency of rail timber and fire wood. On this tract are two houses with necessary out houses, occupied as taverns and store-houses; an apple orchard of 3 or 400 trees, clover, &c. which might be divided as follows:-260 acres of land and marsh, 2 clover lots, 200 apple trees, a well inclosed garden, a convenient tavern, 58 feet long and 16 wide, with a portico the whole length in front, containing 4 rooms below, and a bar, and two rooms above stairs, to which is attached by a covered way, a two story brick house, 22 feet by 18, containing one room and a closet below, the same on the second story and a garret with two rooms, kitchen, dairy, meat-house; a stable and coach house, that will stall from 25 to 36 horses, a small grain-house; a large granary and a cider house and a shed for the presses.-The store houses with a small clover lot and granary, a store and counting room below, and two rooms above stairs, and an excellent cellar, will form another lot.-The third lot will contain between 60 & 70 acres of land, on which is a clover lot and an orchard of 100 and odd apple trees; a dwelling house occupied as a tavern 32 feet long, 20 wide, with a 12 feet shed, containing 4 rooms below a passage and three rooms above stairs, 2 kitchens, a dairy, meat-house, granary, carriage house--also a house 32 by 18 feet which might be fitted for a dwelling house; and this lot might be divided into two, to suit purchasers. 60 acres of land adjoining the lands of Mr. John Carter and Mrs. Clary Heath. 60 acres of land lying about 3 miles from the courthouse, on the main road to Kilmarnock, well timbered with a small dwelling house on it. One lot at Kilmarnock, with a store-house, granary, stable, and kitchen on it. The principal part of the above property is insured against fire. One fourth of the purchase money will be required when the deeds are signed, for the balance a credit of 1, 2 and 3 years will be given, on the purchaser giving approved security for the payment or a lien on the property. Gentlemen who wish to become purchasers will please apply to Rawliegh W. Dovenman, Esq. who resides near the property, and is authorised to dispose of it. An indisputable title will be made by
William I. Lowell.
Culpeper County, June 20, 1816.

The Virginia Herald
July 24, 1816 1:5
Pop-Castle for sale. This desirable seat, so well known, as the residence of the late Mrs. Beverley of King George County, is handsomely situated on the river Rappahannock, 14 miles below Fredericksburg, 8 miles above Port-Royal, and within 5 miles of King George Court House, is bounded on every side by the river, creeks, and main road and contains 500 acres. This land lies level, is considered one of the best farms on the river for wheat, and produces fine crops of corn. On it is a brick dwelling house, 36 feet square, 2 stories high, in excellent repair, brick stable, and meat-house, a new kitchen, ice-house, and in fact every necessary out house for such a farm.-The terms of payment are one half when possession is given which will be the first of January next, and the balance on the first of July 1818, when a complete title will be made. If not previously disposed of at private bargain, it will be sold to the highest bidder on the premises, on the 26th of August next.

Wm. Beverley, Henry S. Beverley Pop-Castle, July 17, 1816.

The Virginia Herald
July 31, 1816 3:5
Public sale. Being desirous of moving to the western country, I offer for sale, the tract of land, whereon I now reside, in this county, containing 736 acres. This land is about one half yet in woods; and is bounded by the lands of Richard Todd, Jacob Berndon, and Dr. George French. The house is 46 feet by 24, containing 4 rooms below and 2 above stairs, with an excellent cellar underneath, and 7 good fire places. The dwelling house and all of the out houses are in good repair. There is an elegant spring of water convenient, and a fine young orchard. The farm affords 50,000 weight of hay annually, and the meadow ground might be much extended. (Slaves for sale.) The terms of sale will be made easy, in order to accommodate the purchaser. (Message to debtors.)
Daniel Hyde.
Spotsylvania, July 31.

The Virginia Herald
August 28, 1816 1;3
The subscriber wishing to remove to the western country, offers for sale his tract of land, in Stafford county, containing by estimation 220 acres. This farm adjoins the lands of Capt. Robert Lewis and Mr. James Jones, and lies about 12 miles above Fredericksburg, in the neighborhood generally known by the name of Quaker's Settlement. There are on this tract about 40 acres of wood land, and a sufficient quantity of prime meadow ground, which may be made very productive by a little reclaiming. The soil is well adapted to the culture of corn and wheat; and likewise is well suited to the production of clover. On this farm is a large dwelling house, which can be made comfortable with but little expense to the purchaser; and also an apple orchard of excellent fruit trees, from which are made every year 6 or 700 gallons of cider, and with proper attention a much greater quantity might be made. It is among the most healthy and pleasant situations in the county and from its proximity to Falmouth and Fredericksburg, would certainly be a profitable and desirable retreat, for a gentleman residing in either of those places, during the sickly seasons-My father, Mr. Gabriel Jones, who resides on the premises, will show the land to any gentleman wishing to purchase. Letter addressed to the subscriber living near Orange courthouse, will be promptly attended to.

Philip Jones August 10, 1816.

The Virginia Herald
august 31, 1816 3:3
Land for sale. Being desirous to remove to the western country, I offer for sale the tract of land, whereon I now live, containing 552 acres, and lying in Spotsylvania county. There is on this land a dwelling house and other convenient out houses, a manufacturing mill, apple and peach orchard, of choice fruit, extensive meadow land. The fertility of the soil is equal if not superior to any in that quarter. For further particulars, the purchaser must view the premises. Negroes will be taken in payment at value.

Geo. Bronaugh.
August 31, 1816.

The Virginia Herald
August 31, 1816 3:4
Smith's Mount for sale. Will be offered for ready sale to the highest bidder, on Monday the 8th of October next, in the town of Leeds, that valuable and well known tract of land, called Smith's Mount, now in the occupancy of Daniel Payne, esq.-possession to be given on the first day of January next. Situated on the Rappahannock River, in the county of Westmoreland, 3 miles below Leeds-Town, and containing 1600 acres.-There are cleared upon this tract 1200 acres; 1100 of which are low grounds of the best quality on said river, and well adapted to the growth of Indian corn, wheat and tobacco, with plentiful streams of water passing thro' each field. There is a grist mill belonging to Mr. Brockenbrough adjoining the premises. The balance of the land is heavily timbered with oak, pine, cedar, walnut, and poplar-The improvements consist of two dwelling houses, in tolerable repair, an office, kitchen, laundry, and all other necessary out houses; a carriage house and stable sufficient to hold 16 or 18 horses, corn-houses and granary, and a young and extensive apple and peach orchard. The whole situated upon an eminence, commanding a full view of all the flats, and an extensive one of the river. The terms of sale will be-one third to be paid on delivery of possession, and the balance in two equal annual payments, thereafter, to be secured by a deed of trust upon the premises. The tract will admit of several divisions, and will be sold to suit purchasers.

Battaile Fitzhugh Flintshire, Caroline, Aug 26.

The Virginia Herald
August 31, 1816 3:5
For sale, A tract of land , containing about 60 acres, lying in Spotsylvania, 6 miles from Fredericksburg, adjoining the lands of Mr. David Henderson and Mr. Richard H. Farish. Of this land there are 10 acres of meadow and 20 in wood; two small dwelling houses, with other conveniences and an apple and peach orchard. The sale will be made for cash; and if not previously sold by private contract, the land will be put up to the highest bidder, on Wednesday the 25th September next, before the door of Mr. Buck's auction room in Fredericksburg. Any person wishing to see the land, may apply to the subscriber living on the premises.

Henry Gass.
August 30th, 1816.

The Virginia Herald
August 31, 1816 3:5
The subscriber will sell his valuable farm in Culpeper county, containing 676 acres; about 6 miles from the court-house, and 36 from Fredericksburg.-The soil is a red loam, and in original fertility not inferior to any in the county. It generally lies well, contains a sufficiency of wood and timber, abounds in fine springs, and has a sufficient quantity of meadow land, a considerable part of which is improved.-The plaster has been tried with great success in the neighborhood. The purchaser will be allowed to sow wheat this fall. Mr. George Teller, who lives on the farm will shew it to any one desirous of viewing it-For terms, which will be accommodating, apply to the subscriber.-Who has also for sale-350 acres of land adjoining the tract on which he lives, before advertised and described in this paper.

Lawrence Battaile.
Prospect Hill, Caroline County.
August 29, 1816.

The Virginia Herald
September 14, 1816 3:4
Notice. The subscriber being desirous to remove to the western country, will sell the well known tavern & farm, at Spotsylvania court-house, at private sale, any time before the 28th day of October, but if not sold before that day, it will be sold at public auction on the premises, that being Spotsylvania Superior Court Day; and as I presume no person will purchase before they view, they can be shewn the premises, and the terms made known, by the subscriber or Capt. John M. Herndon. There is 553 acres of land-nearly of which is prime low grounds on which is a good timothy and natural meadow. The farm is well inclosed and in a high state of cultivation. The tavern is 44 feet by 40, two stories high, conveniently laid off into rooms, above and below, and well finished, good kitchen, stables for 100 horses, ice-house, and all other convenient houses, and as good a spring as there is in the county.

Thomas Hicks.
Spotsylvania, Sept. 14, 1816.

The Virginia Herald
October 23. 1816 1:3
Land for sale. The subscriber will sell the farm, in the lower part of Orange, on which he resides, containing by late survey 517. The land lies within a half a mile of the river. There is a large and constant stream of water running through it, on which has been newly built a saw and grist mill; contiguous to the saw mill on the land, is an abundance of oak and pine timber, of the best quality. The probable opening of the navigation of the river, will afford great facility for the conveyance of plank to market. There is a large quantity of the best meadow land on the farm, some of which is in grass; likewise a comfortable dwelling house, a barn, and every necessary out house, quite new. Any farther description is superfluous. The premises will be shewn at any time, and the terms known by application to the subscriber, or his agent Mr. Richard Randolph.

George W. Thornton.
Near the Wilderness Post Office.
October 19.

The Virginia Herald
November 16, 1816 3:5
Valuable timbered lands for sale. By virtue of the last will and testament of the late Col. Wm. Ball, will be sold at public auction, at Northumberland Court-house, on Monday the 9th of December next, if fair, if not the next fair day, the tract of land, whereon the said Ball lately resided, situate about 8 miles from the said court-house and 2 miles from navigation at Coan Warehouse, and containing 395 acres. The improvements consist of a small framed dwelling, with the necessary and convenient out houses. The cleared land is believed to be as productive as any in the neighborhood; but this tract is rendered extremely valuable by the excellence and abundance of its timber, more than half the tract being covered with a heavy growth of the best oak, hickory, chestnut and ash timber, of the value of which, being so well known, it is unnecessary to say any thing. For the convenience of purchasers, the tract will be sold either entire or in parcels. The terms will be unusually accommodating-no part of the purchase money being required to be paid in hand. Also, at the same time and place, and on the same terms, will be sold, that well known and valuable mill, called Coan Mill, now out of repair, situate at the head of Coan river, and distant from the aforesaid tract about 3 miles. The materials for rebuilding the same, most of them framed and ready to be put down are now on the spot, and will be sold with the mill. The subscriber living near the premises will show the same to any person disposed to purchase any time before the day of sale.

Thos. Towles, Adm'r.
Northumberland Court-house, November 16, 1816.

The Virginia Herald
December 7, 1816 3:3
Fauquier Lands. The subscriber offers for sale the estate whereon he resides, in the county of Fauquier, about 8 miles below the court-house, on Cedar Run, between the roads leading to Occoquan & Fredericksburg, 30 miles distant to either place, and 40 to Alexandria, by the turnpike from Buckland. The tract contains by survey, 3978 acres, and is divided into three farms, with wood land and meadows conveniently distributed for each. There is a valuable mill seat with stone on the spot for building.-The stream is abundant and waters the whole tract, presenting an extent of 4 or 500 acres of low grounds of first quality. The high land is divided into regular fields, and is adapted to the use of plaster.-Few tracts can possess greater advantages, either for extensive grazing or grain culture The purchaser, or purchasers of the land can be accommodated with . . .(Personal estate) The improvements are, a comfortable dwelling house with good out houses, ice house, stables, &c. The situation is healthy and the water uncommonly good. Two thirds of the whole purchase money will be required at the delivery of the property-the balance in short payments with interest, and secured by a deed of trust.

Bernard M. Carter.
Woodstock, Fauquier County.
Dec. 7, 1816.

The Virginia Herald
January 16, 1817 3:5
Land for sale. I offer for sale the farm no which I reside, in the county of Culpeper, containing 600 acres, lying on the Robinson River, 2 miles above its junction with the Rapid Ann, 3 from Taliaferro's and Spotswood's mills, 12 from Culpeper Court-house, 8 from Orange, and 12 from Madison Court-houses. This, perhaps, is one of the handsomest farms in the upper country, lies remarkably well, commanding an extensive view of the Blue Ridge, and the adjacent counties, and is now in excellent order for farming, having from 40 to 50 acres in clover, and 15 in timothy, all laid off in beautiful fields, and well enclosed with straight fences, and ditched. There are no lands in the neighborhood that produce grain of every description better than this.-There is also an excellent mill seat on this land, with a plenty of timber for the support of the farm; and as there are two establishments on the farm, I should have no objection to dividing it for the accommodation of purchasers.-There are also fruits of every description in high perfection in their respective seasons. The buildings are tolerably comfortable. If this farm is not sold before the 10th of February, I shall offer it at public sale on the premises, on that or the next fair day. Any person wishing to contract for the premises previous to that day will apply to the subscriber, who will shew the land-One bid will be reserved, and one only, by the subscriber.

W. Dade.
Oakingham, Jan, 15, 1817.

The Virginia Herald
March 22, 1817 3:5
Tannery for sale.
The subscriber offers for sale the large and extensive tannery, situated on Duke street, containing 4 acres of ground. The improvements are a dwelling, beam and back house, 100 laying away vats, liners, bates, and handlers in proportion, with fountain pumps, mills, &c.; the stock in trade consisting of a large quantity of tanned and green leather, hides, skins, &c. The situation of this property renders it the most desirable in th district, to a company of men desirous of embarking in the business. The contemplated canal from Goose to Hunting creek is reported to pass through it; added to this is one of the most desirable situations for establishing flour stores in Alexandria. The main turnpike road leading from the back country intersects the town at this property. A further description is deemed unnecessary, as it is presumed persons disposed to purchase will view the property. If not sold at private sale by the 1st April, it will on that day be offered at public auction.
John Nepherson & son.
Alexandria, March 22.

The Virginia Herald
April 26, 1817 3:5
Land for sale.
Wishing to make arrangements more agreeable for my family and myself-I offer for sale the tract of land on which I reside, containing 879 acres, within 12 miles of fred'g on the turnpike. The soil is well adapted to the culture of corn and wheat-and the cleared land which has not been cultivated would produce fine tobacco. A considerable proportion of wood and timber standing, and a good site for a mill, (having been viewed by judges) within one mile of town. About 40 acres in clover, and 20 in timothy; and a great deal more meadow might be made. A comfortable dwelling house-4 rooms below, neatly finished, and two above-every house necessary on a farm, well built and in good repair. A neat and productive garden and yard, well enclosed-A pump well of good water convenient. The premises will be shewn and terms made known by the subscriber.
W. Storke.
April 26.

The Virginia Herald
May 10, 1817 3:5
For sale, A small and convenient farm about 7 miles above Falmouth, and 2 from the Rappahannock river; containing 207 acres. Half of the land is under cultivation, and well enclosed, the residue is tolerably timbered with oak and pine. The improvements are a snug dwelling house, and barn, with several out houses-there is also a good peach orchard, and other fruit trees. The tract is well watered by never failing springs. The terms will be accommodating, and may be known by application to W. Brooke of Falmouth or to Thomas Smith, on the premises.
Stafford county, May 10, 1817.

The Virginia Herald
May 17, 1817 3:5
Land for sale.
The subscriber having a growing and expensive family, is desirous to move to Kentucky, and will give a great bargain in the sale of his farm in Caroline county, called Meadow Hill. This farm lies immediately on the stage road from Fredericksburg to richmond, 13 miles from the former place. It contains 350 acres-about 80 acres thereof as rich meadow land as any in the state; some parts of the swamp are from 3 to 400 yards wide; there are 30 acres reclaimed, between 15 and 20 now in grass producing upwards of 2 tons per acre, with a market at the door. The high land is in a high state of improvement, with 3 shifts of about 100 acres each, with a plenty of fire wood and rail timber. The improvements consist of a large two story dwelling house, almost new, with a passage, and 4 rooms on each floor, and a cellar under the whole house, stables, barn, and other out-houses, orchards, &c. &c. This land adjoins that of William Woodford, Esq. Mr. Charles Buckner and others, in a wealthy, healthy, and agreeable neighborhood. The purchaser if he wishes, can have a credit of 5 years on 700 pounds of the purchase money, by paying the interest annually. I would also take in part payment a small tract of Kentucky land, provided it lies within 20 or 30 miles of Lexington and is of good quality. This farm is well worth the attention of gentlemen. Those who can spare a few hundred dollars in improving the meadow, and some other little improvements would render it a desirable residence for a genteel family. It would also be as productive as any farm in the county of the same size. For terms apply to Thomas Dillard.
May 17
The Virginia Herald
June 4, 1817 3:5
Yancey's Mills, &c.
This valuable estate lies in Albemarle County, on the main road from Charlottesville to Staunton, about 8 miles from Rock-Fish Gap, and 16 from James river-the situation beautiful and healthy. The tract of land contains 208 acres, equal in quality to any in the county, a part of which is well set in clover. The improvements are a brick dwelling house, two stories high, 40 by 38, with a cellar the whole size of the house, a mill house, three stories high, (the first stone) 50 by 34-two pair of stones, with Gaines's and Evan's improvements, on a stream that never fails. It is well known this mill is equal to any in the state for making good flour; a distillery,with 3 stills, mash-tubs, &c a malt-house, to which is attached a store and counting house, two stables, well finished, with 32 stalls, overseer's house, kitchen, smoke house, miller's house, cooper's house and shop, blacksmith's house and shop, ice house, barns, &c &c. The most of these houses are new and built of the best materials. There is an excellent little farm adjoining that can be purchased-And the purchaser may be accommodated with an excellent distiller, shoemaker, and blacksmith, upon reasonable terms. Gentlemen at a distance are referred to James Henderson, Esq. of Williamsburg, Charles Whitlock, Esq. and Edmund Anderson, of the house of D.& F Anderson, Richmond, Captain Wm. H. Spiller, of King-William, Capt. B. Oliver of Hanover, & Thomas Taylor of Richmond, who are fully authorized to sell, and by whom the terms will be made known.
Fred'g, June 4, 1817.

The Virginia Herald
June 7, 1817 4:3
Potomack land for sale.
The subscriber intending to remove to a town, offers for sale the farm on which he resides, near the Potomac church, 6 miles from Fredericksburg, 2 from tide water, & lying on the road to the steam-boat landing.-This tract contains 700 acres-400 cleared and under good enclosures, and 300 well timbered with oak, poplar, &c.-This farm possesses many advantages, such as banks of shell marl, fine streams of water passing through every field, quarries of freestone, great susceptibility of improvement by plaster of Paris, through the medium of red clover, as may be seen by experiments now making-convenience to market, &c. &c. There are about 40 acres of rich swamp well adapted to timothy, part of which is cleared, ditched and reclaimed. There is a new dwelling house, containing 5 rooms nearly finished, with some of the necessary out houses, placed in a high, healthy, and commanding situation. The land will be shewn and terms made known on application to the subscriber on the premises.
Thomas F. Knox.
May 28, 1817

The Virginia Herald
June 11, 1817 3:5
Valuable property for sale in Albemarle.
The subscriber offers to sell or rent his lands, mills, and distillery, in the county of Albemarle, on the Ravanna or north fork of the James river. There are 1000 acres of land, 75 of it bottom, about 400 cleared, lying on both sides of the river, which will be divided into two or more farms to suit purchasers-there being two dwelling houses on the land. The wheat-mills are 48 by 60 feet, work two pair of burrs, with new cloths, and new cast metal machine, all drove by water, with a dwelling house adjoining, all insured against fire. There is a store-house, & a distillery working 4 stills, with all necessary houses. On the opposite side of the river from the wheat mills is a house, 30 by 20 feet with three floors, in which are two pair of corn stones, a plaster mill and breaker, a picking and carding machine, with a geared saw-mill, all new and geared with cast metal. All the flour, whiskey and plank, has been and can be boated from the establishment to Richmond. The terms of sale will be made accommodating, and the property shewn by Dabney Minor Fred'g June 11, 1817.

The Virginia Herald
June 18, 1817 1:5
For sale, a small farm, containing 230 acres, nearly 150 cleared-the balance in wood. This land is situated about 4 miles from Falmouth, on the road between that place and Stafford Court-house, and lying on Potomack Run. The situation has been proved by several occupants to be remarkably healthy; and the land has discovered itself to be very susceptible of improvement, even by deep plowing, without manure; it having apparently a good clay bottom throughout. The subscriber has been prevented from making such improvements as might have been done(during the time it has been in his possession) in consequence of a dispute about the title, which is now confirmed to him by the Court of Appeals: but a previous disposal and full employment for all the labour he has at command, stills renders it inconvenient for him to do justice to the farm by a proper cultivation. The terms of payment can be made accommodating to the purchaser if good security is given.
Cary Selden.
Stafford County, June 14.

The Virginia Herald
June 18, 1817 3:3
Valuable property for sale.
I wish to dispose of my tract of land, lying in the County of Westmoreland, adjoining the town of Leeds, containing about 600 acres, 500 of which are the first quality low grounds.-The improvements are considerable, consisting of barns, stables, corn-houses, orchards, overseer's houses, &c.-Also, the lands on which I reside, lying nearly adjoining the above, containing about 500 acres of good forest land, well covered with pine, cedar, oak, chestnut, and hickory; not more than 100 acres of the same being in cultivation. The improvements are very considerable, consisting of a large and convenient dwelling house, stables, granary, kitchen, smoke-house, dairy, and all other necessary out houses, in good repair. There is also on this tract a small family mill, which, although not very valuable, is certainly a great convenience, with about 8 or 10 acres of reclaimed land, lying immediately below it. Any person wishing to possess lands, on tide water, will perhaps never again have an opportunity of making so desirable a purchase. The dwelling house is situated on a high ridge, commanding a view, both of the Potomack, and Rappahannock rivers, distant from the former about 5 miles, and from the latter 2 miles-and no seat in the lower country is considered more healthy than the same-Any person wishing to view the premises and know the terms, will make application to the subscriber.
Wm. Storke Jett Walnut Hill, Westm'd County, June 18, 1817.

The Virginia Herald
June 21, 1817 3:4
Fauquier land for sale.
The subscriber wishing to remove to a new country, will offer for sale on the premises, on the 18th of July 1817, the farm on which he resides, situated in the neighborhood of Elk-Run Church, and adjoining the lands of Major Thomas Gibson, containing about 298 acres-two-thirds of which are cleared and in a state of good cultivation-the balance in wood heavily timbered with oak, hickory, &c. This tract possesses many advantages-such as delightful springs, fine streams of water passing through every field, great susceptibility of improvement by plaster thro' the medium of red clover, convenience to market, &c &c. There is a considerable quantity of the above land well calculated for meadow land, by a little attention, 7 or 8 acres of which have been reclaimed by ditching. There is a most excellent dwelling house, with all others requisite; and what makes it more commanding, the situation is healthy and neighborhood gay. It is needless to say more, as it is presumable the purchaser will view the premises previous to the day of sale. The terms will be one half the purchase money to be paid on the first of September 1817, and possession given the 10th of October following. Two years on the balance, bearing interest, and secured by a lien on the said land.
James Sevlon Fauquier County, June 21, 1817.

The Virginia Herald
July 12, 1817 3:5
Land and negroes for sale.
Will be sold, at the Wilderness Tavern, on the 10th of September next, 600 acres of valuable land, lying in the lower part of Orange County, and about 18 miles from Fredericksburg. This land is heavily timbered with oak and pine, and perhaps no land in Virginia is better adapted to clover and plaster: there are about 15 acres only cleared, which has produced fine crops of wheat and corn: the situation is remarkably healthy, having many never-failing streams thereon. A credit of 6 and 12 months will be given on said land, the purchaser giving bonds with approved security; or good bonds will be received in payment. *Slaves for sale.
John Spotswood.
Orange, July 9, 1817.

The Virginia Herald
July 16, 1817 1:1
Millford for sale.
The subscriber, actuated by many considerations, but principally from having made a purchase in the upper country, and a desire to lessen the number of his engagements here, offers for sale that valuable and very desirable farm on Machodock creek in this county, lately the property of Major B. Ashton, deceased, and known by the name of Millford.-The tract contains 838 acres, lying on navigable water, is well watered and is abundantly supplied with all kinds of timber necessary for the support of the farm, building, &c. The improvements consist of a comfortable two story dwelling house and every necessary out house. The farm is divided into four fields, one of which is bottom land on the creek, and in two of the others a large proportions of rich, reclaimed swamp land, the whole of good quality and highly adapted to the culture of all kinds of produce usual to the climate.-The terms of payment will be about one-fourth in hand, and the remainder in four annual installments, carrying interest from the 1st January next, when entire possession will be given (the purchaser having the privilege of seeding this fall) The priced will be a reduced one if the application be made on or before the first day of September next.
T. Johnson.
King George Court-house, July 5, 1817.

The Virginia Herald
July 16, 1817 3:4
A beautiful farm for sale.
The subscriber offers for sale his summer retreat (called Mantua) containing 730 acres, lying in Stafford County, on the waters of the main Potomac and Poplar runs, 11 miles from Falmouth and 3l2 east of the great mountain road leading to Fauquier court-house. This tract is situated in what was formerly called the Quaker settlement. There has been lately erected a grist mill upon the most approved plan; the house is sufficiently large for manufacturing, and has been so constructed as to be converted to that use with little expense. There was formerly a saw mill adjoining this mill seat, which turned out 1000 feet of plank a day, besides doing the ordinary work of the neighborhood in grinding. The other improvements are a two story dwelling house, kitchen, meat house (and a dairy over the spring) all out of repair; about 30 acres of improved meadow, and 50 more which may be added with very little trouble-orchards of apple, peach and a variety of other fruits too tedious to mention-For terms apply to me living in Fredericksburg, or to mr. Jesse Turner, my overseer on the premises.
N.B. My dwelling house and lot in this place are still for sale.
Robert Lewis July 15, 1817

The Virginia Herald
July 16, 1817 3:5
I offer for sale my tract of land, lying in the County of Stafford, on the waters of Potomac Run, 6 miles from Aquia and 8 from Falmouth, containing by a recent survey 456 acres. One fourth part of the purchase money will be required on possession being given, and the balance in three equal annual payments and security on the land. There is on it a tolerable dwelling house with other out houses, a good apple orchard, with sundry peach and other fruit trees; it is as well watered as any plantation in the county. This land will be offered at public sale to the highest bidder, on the 21st of August next.-Any person wishing to view the premises will apply to Mr. Nathaniel Greaves, near Rock Hill; Mr. Daniel Wormsly, on the premises, or Major Benjamin Ficklin, my agent, who is authorized by me to contract for said land.
Edward Matthews July 12, 1817

The Virginia Herald
July 23, 1817 1:3
Land for sale.
Will be offered for sale on the 15th day of August next on the premises, about 520 acres of land, lying in the County of Orange on the north fork of the North Anna river: it being the tract of land formerly held by Nathaniel Mills, deceased, and is adjoining the lands of Dabney Minor, Isaac graves, sen'r, and the heirs of Captain Thomas bell, deceased. About one half of this tract is now in woods, and covered with heavy timber-and is good tobacco land. The cleared land is well enclosed with a good fence, and may be laid in three shifts sufficient to work 6 or 8 hands. There are about 40 acres of low grounds, all cleared and inferior to none on the river. The improvements are a good dwelling house with 5 rooms on the lower floor, and two above, together with every other convenient out houses that a farmer can require-also a well of excellent water in the yard, and a large orchard of the best selected fruit, from which 200 gallons of brandy may be made annually. The above property is well worth the attention of any gentlemen, who may want a comfortable and profitable home. Those who may be inclined to purchase would do well to view this property before the day of sale. The terms of which will be one third of the purchase money in hand, & the balance in two equal annual payments with a deed of trust on the land to secure the same. The land will be surveyed to the purchaser. The above can be shewn to any person by Mr. Landon Lindsay, who is living on the premises.
Edmund Mills July 15, 1817

The Virginia Herald
August 6, 1817 1:1
For sale, that valuable estate called Thornsbury, situated on one of the branches of the Mattapony, in the lower end of Spotsylvania, about 14 miles from Fredericksburg, and about 44 from Richmond. The land is of good quality and lies extremely well for improvement. The quality and situation of the land render it of much present value, and its position on the shortest road from Fredericksburg to Richmond, which in all probability will, at no very distant period of time, form a part of the great post road through the United States from North to South, promises a considerable augmentation of its value hereafter; it being now a good stand for a well kept tavern, and in that event will be equal to almost any in the country. The tract contains 632 3/4 acres, by recent surveys, and has on it a dwelling house, with four rooms below and three above, and other suitable out-houses, which with a little repair would render very commodious. There is also a large and productive orchard on it, and there is a good mill within a few hundred yards, where the produce of corn or wheat can be conveniently manufactured. The estate will be shewn to any one desirous of purchasing by Mr. Hart, who at present resides on it. A great bargain will be sold in the property if a sale be made before the 1st of October; and on a payment of a small part of the purchase money, a very liberal credit will be given for the residue. A good title in fee simple with general warranty, will be conveyed-If not sold before the first of October, I will rent it for the ensuing year. The purchaser or tenant will have the privilege of seeding wheat the ensuing fall, and possession at the end of the year.
Robert Stanard August 1st, 1817

The Virginia Herald
August 13, 1817 3:5
A valuable farm at public auction.
Will be sold on the premises, to the highest bidder, at public auction, without any reserve, on Monday the first day of September next, that valuable and highly improved farm, occupied by the subscriber in the County of Culpeper, within 22 miles of the court-house, and formerly owned by Philip R. Thompson, Esq. This estate embraces about 1000 acres, with a full proportion in wood and timber; it lies exceedingly well for agriculture, the soil is principally a rich red loam, and from experiment is particularly kind to plaster of Paris, which acts upon it quickly and powerfully. About 200 acres have recently been sown in clover. The farm is well watered with abundant and never failing springs and streams. The improvements are costly and convenient, consisting of a commodious dwelling house, office, kitchen, laundry, ice-house, with several other useful appurtenant buildings. The farm-yard contains stables, carriage-house, granaries, a large new stone cow-house and a threshing machine-it being upon the whole among the most productive & inviting estates above tide water. *personal estate for sale.-Terms of land, less than a third required in hand, the residue in two equal annual payments.
John S. Barbour Culpeper, August 13, 1817

The Virginia Herald
September 10, 1817 1:2
Mantapike for sale.
Will be offered for sale, on the first day of October next, if fair, if otherwise, on the next fair day, the plantation on which the late Mr. Richard Brooke, of King and Queen, resided, called Mantipike. This tract contains about 1700 acres of land, situated on the Mattapony river, within 4 miles of the court-house of the county, and about 32 miles from Richmond. The improvements are a very good dwelling house, and all the requisite out houses in good repair, a large and thriving orchard, and an overshot mill recently built and tolerably well accustomed. In addition to this there is the best shad fishery on the river upon it. It is deemed unnecessary to give a particular description of the fertility of the soil, and the many other advantages which this plantation possesses, as it is presumed that those who wish to purchase will prefer judging for themselves; it may be proper, however, to say that it is considered by the best judges to be equal, if not superior, in all respects, to any land on the river. The terms of payment will be one third in cash when possession is given, and the balance in two annual payments.
William Garnett, Executor of Richard Brooke.
September 5, 1817

The Virginia Herald
September 10, 1817 1:2
Land for sale.
For sale, that valuable tract of land belonging to the estate of Mr. James Marye, deceased, containing about 1000 acres, lying on Lewis River (a branch of the Mattapony) within 9 miles of Fredericksburg, and 4 miles of Spotsyulvania Court-house. The quality and situation of this land render it one of the most valuable farms in the county. The river which runs through it leaving nearly an equal quantity of land on each side, is bounded by low grounds of superior quality, and adapted in a high degree to the cultivation of tobacco or timothy;also, several smaller streams passing through it, afford lands of similar quality, and not inferior in fertility to the lands on the Rappahannock. 100 acres of excellent meadow might be conveniently selected, a large portion of which, and a suitable quantity of the balance of the land is covered with heavy timber greatly valuable by reason of its proximity to market. On a part of this land are a commodious dwelling and suitable out houses, together with a large and productive orchard of choice fruit, and on the other part, on the opposite side of the river, offers a delightful situation for improvement, greatly enhancing the value of this land in even that it should be hereafter divided. A great bargain may be had in the sale of the land if sold in a short time; and an unusual credit suited to the convenience of the purchaser will be allowed for a large portion of the purchase money. For terms apply to Mr. John L. Marye, of Albemarle, Mr. John McCoull who resides on the premises or to Mr. Barker or the subscriber in Fredericksburg.
Lawrence Slaughter September 6, 1817

The Virginia Herald
September 10, 1817 1:2
Valuable property for sale.
Will be sold, on the premises, to the highest bidder, on the 15th of next month (September) that valuable and well known tract of land, (Scotch Farm) whereon Wm. Pollock, deceased, formerly resided, on the head waters of Pamunkey river, in the County of Orange, about 36 miles from Fredericksburg, 65 from Richmond, 8 from Orange Court-house, and 4 from Orange springs. This land contains by supposition 600 acres, about 400 of which is cleared; land well improved, under good fencing, divided into 3 shifts and in good heart; there are about 50 or 60 acres of low grounds, a part of which is in timothy meadow-and the whole might be at a trifling expense, made meadow of, there being little more to do than sowing the seed; the balance of the tract heavily timbered, and all well watered. The improvements are a good dwelling house, kitchen, dairy, meat-house, granary, barn, stables, overseer's house, and every other out house necessary on a farm-a productive garden and well assorted orchard. To this land is attached one half of a very valuable toll mill, having a great run of custom, and a plenty of water.-A deed of trust on the land will be required to secure the payments, which will be easy and made known on the day of sale.
P. C. S. Barbour.
August 21, 1817

The Virginia Herald
September 10, 1817 1:3
Rappahannock land.
For sale, the farm on which the subscriber resides, in the County of Westmoreland. It contains 983 acres, more than 500 of which are Rappahannock flat land, extending to the little town of Leeds; the remainder of the land is generally in woods, except that portion of it that surrounds the dwelling. There are 800 thriving apple trees, with a well selected collection of garden fruits. The house is large, commodious, well fitted up, and in excellent order; the garden highly improved, and the out houses all new and very convenient; there is also a well of water adjoining the kitchen. The situation is high, healthy, and picturesque; from the south door, you overlook the rich scenery of the Rappahannock for a great extent; and from the north, you have a fine view of the Potomac, whitened by the rapidly-increasing commerce of the District of Columbia. For the maintenance of a rich table, no place can surpass this residence; as it enjoys all the productions of both rivers and Venison, fish, wild fowl and oysters, in profusion; nor do those advantages pall upon the appetite in consequence of the climate, for the situation is high and salubrious, affording, it is confidently thought, as much health as is enjoyed on any residence beyond the mountains in the state. Possession will be given the 1st of January next, and purchaser will be permitted to sow small grain when the season commences. Letters addressed to the subscriber near Leed's Town will be attended to.
MacKenzie Beverley August 19, 1817

The Virginia Herald
September 20, 1817 3:5
Mount Landing for sale.
The subscriber offers for sale his farm called Mount Landing, in the County of Essex, lying immediately on a creek emptying into the Rappahannock, and about 4 miles from Tappahannock, containing about 640 acres. I have had this farm in the cultivation of corn and wheat last year and the present, and have succeeded both years remarkably well. This farm is better situated for raising stock of all kinds than any of its size I ever saw, and the quantity of fine hay that can so conveniently be taken from its marshes, affords a ready, easy and certain means of improvement. Mr. Henry Mothershead, who resides on it, will shew it to any person who may wish to view it-For terms apply to the subscriber.
Baldwin M. Lee Lee's Ville, Westmoreland County.
September 15, 1817

The Virginia Herald
September 24, 1817 1:1
To be rented or sold, About 18 acres of land below the town of Fredericksburg, and adjoining the lands of Mess'rs Byrd C. Willis and Jos. Christy; a large proportion of which would produce excellent timothy; the balance is well suited to clover. The greatest part of the land has brought me 6 barrels of corn to the acre; when in wheat, without any manure excepting plaster, it has brought on an average 25 bushels to the acre. There is on it a house that might be made very comfortable for a considerable family, with the expense of about $100. It is well worth the attention of any industrious man to raise vegetables of every description which can readily be sold in town, without the least expense in carrying it to the market. It is well watered having a stream that runs through the whole of it, and two springs near the house. Nothing would induce me to part with this property but my removal from town.-For terms apply to Mr. Anthony Buck or to me at my plantation 4 miles from Fredericksburg.
Geo. French Berclair, Spotsylvania, Sept. 19

The Virginia Herald
October 25, 1817 3:5
1000 acres of valuable Rappahannock land for sale.
This estate lies 18 miles below Tappahannock, immediately on the river, by which it is bounded on the east; on the south by Perrot's Creek, (which is navigable some distance up for vessels carrying 1500 bushels,) and on the north by Muddy Creek-which water courses afford in abundance the finest oysters, crabs, and every variety of fish considered the most delicate. There are on the tract about 600 acres of fine, fertile, flat land, lying remarkably well, and very productive; the remainder lies on the hill that embraces the low ground from creek to creek, and abounds in excellent and useful timber, affording also one of the finest ranges for stock. The improvements, in their present state, are sufficient for the comfortable accommodation of a small family; but at a trifling expense, might be made fit for the reception of a large one: they are new, and the best house unfinished. There are also thriving orchards just in bearing, and a variety of other fine fruit. If this property be not sold by private contract, previous to Essex November Court, it will, on the first day of the term, be offered at public auction, before the tavern of Col. Banks, in Tappahannock. For terms apply to Thomas C. Hoomes, esq. near King and Queen's Court-house, or to Richard Corbin Laneville, October 10, 1817

The Virginia Herald
November 15, 1817 3:5
Mountain land for sale.
I have for sale a very handsome farm, (a part of my estate in Orange County) containing 300 acres of land of superior quality. The tract lies immediately under the south-west mountain; a good proportion cleared with a considerable part in clover, and the rest well timbered, and is supplied with water in every direction from a number of never-failing springs. This farm will afford a very healthy retreat for a gentleman from below, having several eminent sites for building-The price and payments will be made accommodating; and should the land not be disposed of by the 20th of February, it will, on that day, be sold to the highest bidder, on the premises.
Nathaniel Gordon Gordonville, Nov. 11, 1817

The Virginia Herald
November 19, 1817 3:5
Land for sale.
A valuable little farm of 132 acres, in Spotsylvania County, 6 miles west of the court-house, 1/2 a mile from Mr. long's mill, and adjoining the lands of Messrs. Robins and Wilson, will be offered for sale to the highest bidder, at Mr. Lincefield Penny's, near Spotsylvania Court-house, on the 6th December next. About 100 acres of this land is heavily timbered, and the part that is cleared is divided into 3 fields, and is well adapted to the growth of tobacco and small grain. There is on the land a comfortable new framed dwelling house, with some other necessary out houses, some fruit trees,&c. with a crop of wheat seeded.-It is deemed unnecessary to give a further description, as it is presumed persons wishing to purchase will view the premises, which can be shewn by Mr. John Pendleton, living near the place.-Possession will be given on the 1st January, 1818. Terms made known on the day of sale, or before by application to the subscriber living in King-George County.
Thomas Jenkins November 14, 1817

The Virginia Herald
November 29, 1817 3:5
First rate Rappahannock land for sale.
The subscriber offers for sale the farm called Snow-Creek, and he can confidently assure any person desirous to purchase such property, that no farm of the same size on the river is more desirable or productive. It contains between 4 and 500 acres, and believing that no one will purchase the land without a previous examination of it, the subscriber will forbear to detail many of the advantages attached to it. He will, by way of furnishing a general idea of the farm, state that it is distant from this town about 7 miles; that it is bounded on one side by Rappahannock river, and on another side by Snow Creek, which gives name to the farm; that it comprehends a large portion of improved meadow land, yielding annually from 150,000 to 200,000 weight of timothy and superior natural grass hay, for the whole of which, a good and steady market is at hand; that the arable land is laid off into 3 shifts; besides a small field of 40 acres; and though naturally fertile, has been much improved by a series of clover and plaster management-a system particularly beneficial to this land; and for the easy prosecution of it, plaster can always be had on good terms in this place, or at the landing on the farm. The supply of timber and wood is abundantly sufficient for all the purposes of the farm. The buildings consist of a comfortable overseer's house, a new barn, good stables, and two new framed houses for the people. The land contains several bold never-failing springs of the best water-the situation is healthy and in every respect eligible for the residence of a family. There is also upon this farm a valuable mill-seat, and the neighborhood thickly settled and wealthy. Mr. Proctor, the manager on the farm, will attend on any one desirous to view it. Proposals to purchase this property will be received and promptly attended to by the subscriber, residing in this place-The payments required will be one-fourth the amount on the delivery of the land, and the balance in three equal annual payments thereafter, each payment to bear interest from the delivery of the land till paid. Satisfactory security will be required for the deferred payments, on obtaining which a perfect conveyance for the land will be executed by Hugh Mercer.
N.B. A plat of the land will very soon be made, and the precise quantity ascertained.
Fred'g Nov. 29, 1817

The Virginia Herald
December 3, 1817 3:4
Valuable land for sale.
Will be sold, to the highest bidder, on the premises, the 27th day of December next, the tract of and known by the name of Hickory-Point, lying on the river Ny, in Spotsylvania County, and adjoining the lands of Addison M. Lewis, Mrs. Mary Dangerfield, and John Stewart. This land is within 10 miles of Fredericksburg, and contains 405 acres, more than half of which is in wood, and well timbered, and the arable part in a high state of improvement. There is a commodious dwelling house with 4 rooms below stairs, and suitable out houses on the land. About 20 bushels of wheat are now sown, and there is an excellent chance for a crop of tobacco, oats, and corn for the ensuing year. Possession can be had immediately after the sale. The terms are, one third of the purchase money to be paid in 60 days, and the balance in two equal annual payments.-This land is situated in a pleasant neighborhood, and is well worth the attention of those who wish to purchase. The land will be shewn by the subscriber, or Benjamin Alsop, who lives on the land.
Samuel Alsop Spotsylvania, Nov. 27, 1817

The Virginia Herald
December 6, 1817 3:5
Anxious to remove to the south-western country, I offer for sale my farm adjoining the lands of Messrs. William C. Willis, Francis W. Taliaferro and others. This farm contains 420 acres, and in quality is inferior to few in the County of Orange; it is well enclosed and laid off into 4 fields, 3 of which have been seeded in clover-the effect of clover and plaster of Paris on this land has exceeded the most sanguine expectation. The country around is healthful and picturesque; the society equal to any in the state. Orange court-house is distant 5 miles; Fredericksburg, 35-The Swift Run Turnpike Road passes within 3 miles. The Rapid Ann river, which will probably be made navigable in a short time, a law having been passed and money subscribed for that purpose, is within one mile. There are 100 bushels of wheat seeded on the farm. The improvements consist of a comfortable dwelling house, a kitchen, smoke house, barn and wheat machine, and other necessary out buildings, all of which have been built within 5 years. Also, the half of a valuable merchant mill and corn mill, situate on the Rapid Ann river, one mile from the farm. The merchant mill is now undergoing a thorough repair; the machinery of cast metal on the most improved construction, and will be capable of manufacturing from 80 to 100 bushels per day-30 or 40,000 bushels of wheat per year may probably be gotten to grind on toll, and as much as the mill can manufacture may be purchased. The corn mill yields from 250 to 300 bushels of toll corn annually. My interest in the mills has been leased out for 10 years; it is offered subject to the rent. Terms of sale may be known by personal application or by letter addressed to George H. Spotswood.
Orange Court-house, December 3, 1817

The Virginia Herald
December 24, 1817 3:5
For sale, The subscriber wishing to remove to the western country, offers for sale the following farms, containing aggregately, 2,500 acres. The mansion-house tract, he estimates at 1,500, of which 500 are cleared. The dwelling house stands on an eminence, having in view the whole farm-there are 7 rooms in it, three below and 4 above, with convenient closets, passages, store-rooms, and it is almost new and in good repair, with two offices, and every other necessary out house. The grounds well laid off about the house, with a beautiful and productive falling garden. There are orchards of every description, a large meadow, constant springs and the farm well divided into fields and lots. The farm and situation (being remarkably healthy) is justly considered one of the most desirable in the upper country. The land is good and adapted to plaster and clover-it is distant from Fredericksburg 30, and from Washington 50 miles. The other two farms contain 1000 acres-the whole of the red close soil and well watered, to each of which there is a comfortable dwelling house-The Rappahannock is within 2 miles of them, which will soon be navigable, the inhabitants having largely subscribed thereto, and the legislature aiding them with funds, having passed an act to that purpose. The subscriber offers this valuable estate at the reduced price of $15 per acre. It will be sold entire or separate as may suit purchasers, and in reasonable payments.
Charles Carter Culpeper County, Dec. 20, 1817

The Virginia Herald
January 4, 1818 3:5
Piedmont for sale.
The subscriber wishing to remove to the south western country, offers for sale his valuable seat in Orange County, containing about 350 acres, lying on the Rapid Ann river, adjoining the lands of William C. Willis and George W. Spotswood, and one mile and a half from Spotswood & Fisher Mills. The land is equal to any in the county, and has a sufficient quantity of timber; there is also a great deal of meadow land, a good dwelling, and three convenient houses, with a threshing machine. I deem it unnecessary to give a minute description of this handsome seat, as all persons wishing to purchase will come and view this property.
Hay Taliaferro.
Piedmont, Dec. 5, 1817

The Virginia Herald
January 17, 1818 3:4
Federal Hill for sale The subscriber offers for sale that well known seat adjoining the town of Fredericksburg, called Federal Hill, lately the property and formerly the residence of Thomas R. Rootes, Esq-The lot contains upwards of 2 acres of ground. The buildings are a large, elegant and substantial two-story wood dwelling house with kitchen and other out houses-which, with a trifling expenditure, may be made very commodious and comfortable. The site is elevated and healthy, and the neighborhood genteel. It is, on the whole, one of the most desirable spots for a private residence in the environs of Fredericksburg; and not unworthy of the attention of the capitalist who wishes to invest his money with a view to the future appreciation of property, by the certain extension and improvement of the town in that direction, it being situated on the main road leading to the heart of town from the westward-extending 454 3/4 feet upon Hanover street, (the street leading into the town) and 175 feet upon Prince Edward street, both of which streets have been recently extended.-A clear and indisputable title can be given, and the terms will be accommodating if application be made immediately. If not sold shortly, the above property will be to rent.
Wm. F. Gray.
January 17, 1818

The Virginia Herald
January 31, 1818 3:4
For sale, That valuable tract of land known by the name of Bushfield, in the County of Westmoreland, situated on the lower side of Nomony and extending along its banks for upwards of two miles from the entrance of that river into the Potomac. A minute description of this property will be given to any gentleman disposed to purchase, on application to Major George Lewis of King George County, Va. or to the subscriber, who being authorized to sell the land, will give every necessary information. This tract contains upwards of 800 acres of fertile river bottom, better than one fourth of which is covered with a heavy growth of white oak timber, admirably suited for ship building; and considering its nearness to ship navigation and the great demand for naval supplies in the City of Washington, may be well estimated alone as an important source for the accumulation of wealth. Nearly one half of the remainder is in pine wood of the most valuable sort for market, one acre of which would produce 50 cords, and may be sold, as it now stands, at 50 per cord. That portion already in cultivation is inferior in quality to none in the northern neck. The soil in many places is intermixed with oyster shells, two or three feet below the surface, and is better suited for the growth of wheat than almost any other in the vicinity. A valuable shad fishery is added to its advantages, and it may be said with truth that no estate in Virginia combines more conveniences than this; for it is also one of the most healthy situations in the lower country.
John Campbell.
January 31.

The Virginia Herald
February 11, 1818 3:5
Valuable land for sale.
The subscriber, anxious to remove to the western country, offers for sale on moderate terms, that well known and beautiful farm called Cherry Grove, in the County of Orange, 35 miles from Fredericksburg, 12 from Orange court-house, 10 from Culpeper court-house, 10 from Stevensburg and convenient to the Rapid-Ann river. This land contains 714 acres, well enclosed with a locust and chestnut fence, with a sufficient quantity of the same kind of timber to support the fencing forever.-The portion of wood land is between 3 and 400 acres, affording a variety of the most valuable timber. The arable part of this land is divided into 5 fields and several lots, one of which containing 20 acres is handsomely set with clover, and produced the last year an abundant crop. It is confidently believed that no farm in this part of the country is more happily adapted to the beneficial effects of plaster. The improvements are a commodious dwelling and necessary out houses, situated on a convenient part of the farm, uniting the advantages of a handsome yard and garden, an apple and peach orchard of choice fruit, and a never failing spring of good water. The contemplated navigation of the Rapid-Ann offers such advantages to this land as to render it in a particular degree worth the attention of those who wish to purchase, as there are several manufacturing mills adjoining it, and the locust posts that may be conveniently spared from the land, would more than pay for it. Possession will be given in time to sow wheat the ensuing fall. Any person wishing to purchase will make early application to the subscriber living on the premises.
George Shepherd February 9, 1818.

The Virginia Herald
March 7, 1818 3:5
The subscriber being in bad health, wishes to decline business. He offers for sale his mills, with near 500 acres of land attached to them, known by the name of the Hazle River Mills, lying in Culpeper County, and state of Virginia, about 10 miles above Culpeper courthouse, 50 miles from Fredericksburg. The mill-house is 50 feet long and 36 wide, three stories high, with 2 pair burr mill stones, one pair 5 feet, the other pair 42 feet diameter-one pair rubbers, and a pair of country stones for grinding corn, with all other necessary machinery about a manufacturing mill. There are a few acres of meadow now in timothy-more can be made at little expense. There are a tolerable good dwelling house, with a store-room at one end of the house; a new still-house lately erected; it has not been put to operation-a saw mill and some other houses which are useful about a mill. I think it useless to say any thing more about this property. Any person wishing to own such a property I will thank them to call and view it, and the terms will be made known by the subscriber who lives on the place.
Prichard Newby.
Hazle River Mills, Culpeper County, Va.
March 2, 1818.

The Virginia Herald
April 4, 1818 3:5
I will sell my Richland estate, consisting of 3600 acres of land, lying between 30 and 35 miles from the District of Columbia, binding 5 miles on Potomac river and 2 on Aquia creek.-3/4 of this estate consist of low grounds of excellent quality-the woods abound in locust, chestnut, black walnut, hickory and oak-the soil is excelled by none on the Potomac. There are now in clover about 500 acres, and 110 in timothy-70 of this of reclaimed marsh land. The improvements are a manufacturing mill, with 2 pair of stones, on a never-failing stream; two comfortable dwelling houses, 4 barns and other out houses. This estate will divide eligibly into farms from 500 to 1200 acres, and would be thus sold if desired. Combining every advantage of property similarly situated, and contiguous to one of the most rapidly improving markets of the United States, a more minute description is deemed unnecessary. By early application a great bargain may be had in this property. I would also sell some valuable freestone quarries lying on Aquia creek.-Payments accommodating.
William Brent, jr.
Richland, near Aquia, March 30, 1818.

The Virginia Herald
April 11, 1818 3:5
Lands for sale.
The subscriber being anxious to remove to the western country will sell a great bargain in his lands. The tract on which he resides, within 3 miles of Lancaster courthouse, Virginia, contains 100 acres, well improved with a comfortable dwelling house, a good barn, and other necessary houses for the comfortable accommodation of a large family. Also, a well improved tan-yard, currying shop, &c. &c. which is very profitable, there being no other in 30 miles. One half of this land is cleared and laid off into 3 equal lots, the whole well enclosed with chestnut rails, and the greater part highly manured. The balance of this tract is covered with a growth of oak, hickory, dog-wood, &c. &c. Adjoining this land is a tract of 400 acres, on which is a dwelling house and orchards, and a quantity of valuable timber, which would be sold on reasonable terms. I would also sell for a reduced price 22 acres lying in Northumberland County, 9 miles from the other lands. Nearly half this tract is valuable low grounds, the balance covered with a growth of oak, chestnut, hickory, &c. A dwelling house and other improvements are attached to this farm, and it is convenient to fish, oysters,&c. in abundance. Further particulars are deemed unnecessary, as it is presumed no person would purchase without viewing the premises.
Richard Payne.
April 10, 1818.

The Virginia Herald
April 15, 1818 3:4
Gould Hill-for sale.
This valuable estate lies in Hanover County, upon the main road leading from Hanover town, to Hanover Court-house, 2 miles from the first, and 6 miles from the latter, contains about 1000 acres of land, one third low grounds of the first quality, lying on the Pamunkey River by which it is bounded for more than a mile; the balance of the tract is high land of superior quality with wood and timber sufficient to support the estate-it is finely watered and distant 18 miles from the city of Richmond. Upon the estate are two strong brick houses, 36 by 18 feet, one in complete order for a family, the other can be made so at a small expense; there is also the walls of a two story house, 63 feet by 47, of most elegant workmanship; the roof has been burnt by fire, but the walls so little injured that they may be built on immediately. The sale will take place on the first day of July next, on the premises to the highest bidder; one half of the purchase money to be paid on the day of sale, for the balance a credit of 1 and 2 years, taking a security on the land. Mr. West, who is the manager, will shew the land to any person wishing to purchase and the price will be made known by an application by letter (post paid) to the subscriber near Gloucester court-house. The purchaser will be permitted to seed small grain, and may have full possession the first of December, one barn only being kept to protect the crop till a sale can be made of it.
Thomas R. Rootes.
White-Marsh, February 25, 1818.

The Virginia Herald
May 13, 1818 3:5
For sale, A valuable mill & farm in and adjoining the town of Falmouth. I am authorized to sell the grist mill, in the town of Falmouth, the property of Murray and Triplett, which is now in good order, and may be easily improved into a flour manufacturing mill. The mill-house and granary are built of stone. The farm (whereon Mr. William Richards formerly resided) containing about 150 acres, most of which is good land, with a good orchard and garden, a large dwelling house, the situation of which for health and pleasantness is inferior to none, with an excellent spring. Also about 300 acres of land within two miles of Falmouth, late the residence of Mr. Withers, now in cultivation and well enclosed. If the above property is not sold before the 2d day of June next, it will then be offered at public auction, in the town of Falmouth, on a liberal credit.
Wm. S. Stone.
Fred'g April 15.

The Virginia Herald
May 13, 1818 3:5
A small farm for sale.
The subscriber offers for sale his farm about 10 miles below Fredericksburg, on the main road from that place to King-George Court-house, lying on Muddy Creek Run, about 3/4 of a mile above its junction with the Rappahannock, in King George County, except a field of about 60 acres which lies on the Stafford side of the run. There are about 300 acres, half-of which are cleared and in cultivation, and generally of good quality-indeed the land on the creek, say 40 acres, (about 20 of which are cleared and a part of that in timothy) is little inferior to any low grounds in the County. The part of the land not cleared is of excellent quality, as the growth with which it is covered evinces, viz: oak, hickory, dogwood, redbud, and some walnut, including an ample fund of timber for enclosing & building. There are on the premises a comfortable dwelling for a small family, and necessary out houses, a spring of fine water, and it is an unquestionably healthy situation. It can be viewed at any time by any persons disposed to purchase, and the terms made known by applying to me. If a disposition is not effected by a private bargain of this property before the first of October next, it will then be offered for public sale at Mr. Jenkins' TAVERN, NEAR THE PREMISES.
Meriwether Taliaferro.
April 14, 1818.

The Virginia Herald
May 20, 1818 3:5
Island Mills.
For sale, that valuable island, and mill, in Stafford County, state of Virginia situated on the falls of the Rappahannock river, just above tide water, about a half a mile from the town of Falmouth, and one mile from the town of Fredericksburg. There are 87 1/2 acres of rich fertile land on this island, inferior to no land in the state; about 70 acres of which in cultivation, the one half in clover, and the other half in corn, well enclosed with a stone and post and railing fence, the balance in timber, a young thrifty apple orchard, with a variety of other fruit trees.-The mill house is large and commodious, built of stone, the machinery of iron-the construction of the mill is said to be equal if not superior to any mill heretofore erected, having every necessary machinery for the manufacture of flour. The burr stones are 7 feet, and can grind from 120 to 130 barrels of flour per day and night, and with a small additional expense may be made to manufacture a third more. The supply of wheat is abundant, a part of which is generally procured in town. There is on this island near the mill, a large stone dwelling house and kitchen, with a good garden well enclosed, a meat-house, poultry house, ice-house, miller's house, a waggoner's house, corn house, good stables and hay-houses, with a good spring, dairy, &c.-This island possesses many natural advantages for improvement, there being two other sites for water works, with an abundant supply of good building stone on or near the spot for building, with a good supply of water. The mill and dwelling house have been insured, in the Mutual Insurance Society of Virginia. This property is all in good order and worthy of the attention of any gentleman disposed to engage in the milling business-Possession will be given immediately after the sale. For terms apply to the subscribers.
Howard & Lawrence.
Fred'g, May 19, 1818.

The Virginia Herald
June 17, 1818 3:5
A farm for sale.
Intending to leave the state, I offer for sale my farm, 12 miles from Fredericksburg, on the turnpike road, containing 679 acres. The soil is well adapted to the culture of corn and wheat, as may be seen by the growing crop and is very susceptible of improvement by the clover and plaster system, as has been experienced. The land which has been cleared and not cultivated would produce fine tobacco-there are at least 50 acres in clover and a few in timothy-a great deal of meadow may be made-the greatest abundance of wood and timber for the support of the farm, and to spare-The improvements consist of a comfortable dwelling house, 4 rooms below and 2 above stairs, neatly finished, a portico full length of the house; every necessary out house, well built and in fine order-a handsome and productive garden and yard, neatly enclosed-a pump-well of excellent water-the seat remarkably healthy. A more accurate description is deemed unnecessary, as it is presumed any person wishing to purchase will view the property, which will be shewn and terms (which will be accommodating) made known by the subscriber.
W. Storke.
Woodland, June 16, 1818.

The Virginia Herald
July 29, 1818 2:4
Valuable property for sale.
Will be offered at public auction,on the first Monday of August next, on the premises, that well known tavern and tract of land, at Spotsylvania court-house. The tract contains 5534 acres, about 100 of which is meadow land, on which is a good timothy meadow. The tavern is a large well finished house, 44 by 44, two stories high, with 10 rooms-there is an ice-house and all other houses necessary I presume no stranger will purchase without first viewing the premises, and therefore it is not necessary to give a full description of the place. The land will be shewn at any time by the subscriber, and the terms made known on the day of sale, which will be accommodating.
Thomas Hicks Spotsylvania court-house, June 12, 1818.

The Virginia Herald
August 8, 1818 3:5
Hayfield for sale.
This very valuable estate is situated on the south side of Rappahannock river, in Caroline County, 10 miles below the town of Fredericksburg, and contains between 2 and 3000 acres, the greater part of which is in wood, and will be divided into two tracts if desired to suit purchasers. There is prime meadow land, enough if improved, to make between 2 and 300 tons of hay annually.-So to those acquainted with this very desirable estate, nothing is necessary to be said; and to those who never saw it, I presume will which to view it. The improvements are a large two story brick house, 4 rooms on a floor and a passage, the same in the cellar, with 2 fire places; brick dairy and meat house, kitchen and laundry, good stable and granary, a never failing ice-house-also a fine spring of water convenient to the house, and fine orchards. In point of natural beauty and health, it is surpassed by no seat on tide water. This property will be shewn by me or in my absence, by my son, who lives with me, and the terms made known.
Hay Battaile.
August 7, 1818.

The Virginia Herald
August 29, 1818 1:2
The subscriber will offer for sale, on the premises, on the 25th of September next, that beautiful seat called Ossian-Hall, formerly the residence of Dr. D. Stuart. This seat is 9 miles from Alexandria, and between 10 and 11 from Washington and Georgetown, and lies within a half a mile of the Little River Turnpike-The tract contains 830 acres, with timber on it sufficient for its support-is well watered, abounding with never-failing springs. There is a stream called the Accotinck, that passes thro' the one end of the farm, on which there is upwards of 100 acres of fertile low grounds, a large part of it in timothy meadow, the product of which can be seen on the premises.-There will be upwards of 100 acres of corn & fallow ground to seed this fall. The buildings are good-the dwelling house is two stories high, with 7 rooms and a well finished garret. The situation is elevated and commands a view of many of the neighboring farms-the garden is large and abounds in the most choice fruit our country is capable of producing-there is also a large and flourishing apple orchard. *Personal estate for sale. The terms will be very accommodating and will be made known on the day of sale-any one wishing to view the place will please apply to Mr. Pratt, who is the overseer to the farm.
John S. Thornton.
August 26, 1818.

The Virginia Herald
September 4, 1818 3:5
Land for sale in Albemarle.
The subscriber wishes to sell 600 acres of land in said County, nearly half cleared; the balance, and the cleared land, well enclosed; all well adapted to the culture of corn, wheat and tobacco; through which runs a bolt creek, which the subscriber has been at a great expense straightening. This land has a number of excellent springs on it, and is now in complete order for farming. The wood land is well timbered; the greater part of which would bring good tobacco. The cleared land has been chiefly cleared by the subscriber, and has never been abused nor galded; on which are a number of bearing apple trees of best fruit; also other fruit trees; a good barn, small dwelling house, kitchen, spring house, corn house, stables, negro houses, &c. &c. The subscriber also wishes to sell the tract of land on which he resides nearly adjacent to the above land, containing 270 acres, the greater part of which lies well: about 100 acres cleared, the balance of good quality, and as well improved as any place of its same size-has on it an excellent dwelling house, kitchen, barn, stables, spring house, negro houses, smoke house, &c. &c.-a garden well enclosed and highly manured and improved; also excellent orchards of never failing fruit trees of apple, peach, cherry, plum, pear, &c. also good and substantial tobacco houses; also a young orchard of 4 or 500 apple trees of best kind, planted lately and look thrifty. 15 or 20 acres of meadow, lately made. Said land is in a high state of improvement, and is perhaps one of the most desirable places in the upper country. The buildings are all nice and substantially fixed, adjoining Yancey's Mills. The subscriber will take in part lands in Kentucky or Tennessee, a few negroes, well recommended. Payments to be secured and made easy. Possession can be had the 1st of January next, if sold before will leave to seed this fall. The terms will be made known by Colonel Charles Yancey, near said land, or the subscriber.
Jechonias Yancey.

The Virginia Herald
September 19, 1818 3:5
For sale, the tract of land whereon I now live, lying in the upper end of Essex County, within 32 miles of Rappahannock river.-It contains about 1500 acres, 1/3 of which is well timbered with red and white oak, and pine suitable for scantling and plank.-There are 20 or 30 acres of reclaimed swamp in good order for cultivation: a dwelling house 48 feet long and 18 feet wide, with a passage and two rooms below and 3 above, a portico the whole length of the house. There are also a good barn and other out houses-This land can very conveniently be laid off into lots of 3 or 400 acres, to suit purchaser, to whom the terms will be made known, on application to the proprietor.-A more particular description of the tract is deemed unnecessary: but the subscriber will add, that experience has proved this situation to be as healthy as any in the whole extent of the lower country, and that he will sell a great bargain in it.
Thomas Pitts September 16.

The Virginia Herald
September 19, 1818 3:5
Land for sale.
400 acres, lying a half a mile from Nomony river, a branch of the Potomac, in Westmoreland County, about 10 miles below Westmoreland court-house-On this land is a dwelling house with 3 rooms on the lower and 2 on the upper floors, kitchen, dairy, smoke house, and granary; snug apple and peach orchards, a good garden with a selection of fruit, forward and latter, delightful water in 30 or 40 yards of the house-about 3/4 is in timber, principally red and white oak, hickory, red cedar and chestnut.-nearly equally as convenient to the markets of Baltimore, Alexandria and the City--convenient to mill and church and that noted river Nomony that abounds with the best of fish, oysters and wild fowl, extensive ranges, &c.-Possession may be had this fall. The land will be shewn by Mr.. George Smith, who lives on the premises. For further particulars enquire of the subscriber who lives in Machoduck neck.
George Christopher Sept. 19.

The Virginia Herald
September 26, 1818 1:3
Public sale.
Will be offered at public sale on Wednesday the 4th of November, if fair, if not, the next fair day, at the residence of the late Baylor Banks, deceased, *Personal estate Also-Bellevue, the farm on which the decedent resided, will be offered for sale at the same time-This tract of land containing 500 acres, is situated in the County of Culpeper, about 5 miles from Stevensburg, 12 from the court-house, and 26 from Fredericksburg, and is one of the most valuable in the County; being well suited for the culture of corn wheat and tobacco. The arable part is at present divided into 4 fields; three of which is bounded by Mountain-run, affording an abundant proportion of fertile low grounds; a smaller stream passes through the other division, on which there is some valuable meadow. About 40 acres of this land is well set with clover, from which a luxuriant crop of hay may be made the ensuing year. 2 years experience have satisfactorily proven the beneficial effects resulting from the use of plaster. The elevated situation of this farm commands an extensive and beautiful view of the Blue-Ridge & neighboring farms. It is unusually healthy and inferior to none in the County for good society. The improvements are a large two story dwelling house, kitchen, with 5 rooms, and other suitable out houses, a well of excellent water in the yard, a commodious barn, a large new framed granary, with two rooms below and one above, and a cellar intended for stables; at a convenient distance is a shelter for the storage of hay and fodder. The peach and apple orchards are extensive and furnish an abundance of choice fruit. In addition to the immediate advantages attached to this property, the subscriber conceives it derives an increased value from its convenience to the Rappahannock river, being not more than 3 miles from its northern, and 4 from its southern branches, which it is expected will be made navigable in the course of the ensuing year-there are also 4 manufacturing mills in the neighborhood, where the produce of the farm can be disposed of at a small deduction of Fredericksburg prices. If application be made before the day of sale, this property will be sold privately. The terms of sale will be one-third in hand, the balance in 1 & 2 years, to be secured by a lien upon the land. Reference may be had to Richard T. Banks, on the premises or the subscriber in Spotsylvania County.
John F. Banks, Ex'or of B. Banks, dec' September 23, 1818.

The Virginia Herald
January 2, 1819 1:2
Public sale of lands and mills.
Pursuant to the last will and testament of Prichard Newby, late of Culpeper county, will be offered for sale to the highest bidder, on Thursday the 14th day of January next, at the late residence of the decedent, the Husle River Mills, with four valuable tracts or parcels of land, containing in the whole about 410 acres. These tracts adjoin each other and are bounded for nearly a mile by the river, embracing a portion of valuable low grounds. The mill house, which stands nearly at the extreme end of the upper tract, is large and well constructed for manufacturing, running two pairs of burrs and one pair of country stones, with machines complete, and is in a good neighborhood for procuring great abundances of mountain wheat.-There is also on the premises a saw-mill, a comfortable dwelling house with a storeroom, a miller's house, and other convenient houses. This property lies about 50 miles from Fredericksburg, 10 above Culpeper courthouse, and about 20 miles below the Blue Ridge, The land may be divided to suit purchasers. At the same time and place will be sold an equitable title which the decedent held in a part of the tract of land occupied by the Widow Nulle, which she has a life estate on; it nearly adjoins the mill tract. The terms of sale will be one third the purchase money in hand, the other two thirds in equal annual installments, the purchaser giving bond with approved security, bearing interest from date if not punctually paid.
Richard Norris Administrator with the will annexed of Prichard Newby.
Dec. 5, 1818

The Virginia Herald
January 2, 1819 4:2
For sale, the half of that valuable mill property, owned by the subscriber, lying in the County of Orange, within two miles of the Swift-Run Turnpike, and 35 miles of Fredericksburg, adjoining the lands of Wm. C. Willis and others, and situated on the Rapid-Ann river; which river there is but little doubt will be made navigable in the next few years. This property consists of a large manufacturing mill, running three pairs of burrs, with all machinery of cast mettle and finished off in the first stile. The corn-mill is separate and runs two pair of stones; a plaster and cob machine. The saw-mill will be complete anew in a few days. There are 5 acres of land attached to this property, on which there is every necessary house. My part of this property is leased out for a term of years at $1,000 but pays $800 per year, $200 having been allowed in consideration of certain alterations being made. The neighborhood is one of the most genteel in the state, and as much wheat can be procured as the mill can manufacture. It is unnecessary to give a more minute description, as I presume the purchaser will first view the property. For further particulars enquire of Mr. John Scott, of Fredericksburg, or the subscriber, living within one mile of the property.
George W. Spotswood.
Nov. 3, 1818.

The Virginia Herald
January 2, 1819 4:3
Land for sale.
I will sell my plantation known by the name of Read's Tract, containing between 7 and 800 acres of land. It lies in Middlesex county, near the town of Urbanna, and convenient to excellent fish & oysters. There is about 50 acres of the above land cleared, the balance well timbered, and with a little clearing, an extensive meadow might be made. Those wishing to purchase will please enquire of the subscriber in Fredericksburg. Also, the farm on which I live, containing 52 acres, and bounded by the lands of Messrs. Thornton and Poindexter. The improvements are a good frame dwelling, containing 4 rooms, a kitchen, smoke house, & stable, all in good repair-There is also an excellent spring of water convenient to the dwelling house.
Robert B. Fife.
Fred'g. Oct. 7. 1819.

The Virginia Herald
January 13, 1819 3:5
For sale, The subscriber intending to move to Mississippi, offers for sale, the tract of land, in the county of Stafford called Cedar Grove, situated 17 miles from Falmouth and 2 from the Rappahannock river, containing between 900 and 1000 acres by a recent survey; 500 of which are heavily timbered with white, black, red oak & hickory, interspersed with large pine. The residue consists of arable land and meadow; of the latter there is 80 acres, nearly half of which is well set in grass, and has a constant stream running through it. About midway the meadow there is a grist mill in complete order for grinding, and in a good neighborhood for custom. Lower down on the same water course there is a site where a saw mill might advantageously be placed. The clear high land is well divided and enclosed; there are 142 bushels of wheat sown, and about 70 acres in clover. From the many experiments that have been made, it is ascertained that this land may be greatly improved by the use of clover and plaster. There is a house on this farm which at a small expense may be made a comfortable dwelling, as also all necessary out houses. There is a large orchard of well chosen fruit trees.-The purchaser can get possession the 1st of September, or sooner if required. For terms apply to Charles C. Randolph.
Jan. 9, 1819.

The Virginia Herald
January 16, 1819 2:4
Land for sale.
The subscriber offers for sale his tract of land, in the county of Stafford, lying on the main road leading from Falmouth to Fauquier Court-house, about 10 miles above the former place, and 28 below the latter. This beautiful little tract of land contains about 3000 acres, one third of which is in the original growth of good timber. The whole is well watered, having a stream running quite through it, on which are about 30 acres of good meadow ground. There is also a good orchard of apples, peaches, and pears. The cleared ground is well adapted to plaster and clover. -The improvements are commodious, consisting of a dwelling house with six rooms and four fire-places, and the necessary out houses.
Daniel F. Paune.
January 16, 1819.

The Virginia Herald
February 6, 1819 1:2
Roxbury.
This valuable tract of land contains about 1600 acres, by an old survey, lies within 10 miles of Fredericksburg, and is bounded on the north and south by two branches of the Mattapony River-on the south branch are about 100 acres of low grounds of the best quality, lying high and dry-on the north branch is an extensive marsh, supposed to contain between 4 and 500 acres, which, when drained would be inferior to no land in Virginia. The balance of the tract is equal if not superior to any land in that neighborhood. The marsh contains a great variety of valuable timber. The improvements consist of a large two story dwelling house, and a few out houses; a valuable apple and peach orchard. There is an excellent mill seat on the south branch, within 200 yards of the house, 4/7 of this tract of land are offered for sale upon accommodating terms. The other shares can be easily purchased as the children come of age. Apply to Samuel Slaughter, of Culpeper.
Jan. 27, 1819.

The Virginia Herald
February 6, 1819 1:2
To rent for the present year, A valuable stone-quarry, on the north bank of the Rappahannock river, and has been hitherto occupied by Messrs. Carter and Young. This quarry contains an inexhaustible body of stone, and has been highly approved of in every part wherever it has been sent. This quarry lies about three miles from Fredericksburg; a large convenient wharf, where a vessel of almost any size can load just at the quarry. -Any person wishing to rent will apply to the subscriber, living on the farm, known by the name of The Little Falls, the property of Mr. Joseph Downman, deceased.
Charles Bruce.
Jan. 23, 1819.

The Virginia Herald
February 6, 1819 4:4
To rent, That beautiful seat called, Buckhannan's, adjacent to the town of Falmouth; its eminence commands the handsomest prospect in the neighborhood, having a complete view over each town, and a considerable distance down the Rappahannock river. -I would rent the dwelling house and its appurtenances, which consist of a large double kitchen, smoke house, dairy, and a convenient office, with a large garden, and well of excellent water in the yard, all in complete repair. The healthiness of this situation needs no comment. *Mahogany for sale. The cellar under the Baptist meeting house is for rent; it is large and spacious and well calculated for the storage of goods. Also, one tenement in the brick house opposite Mr. William Caldwell's. Apply to A. Walker.
Jan. 27.

The Virginia Herald
February 17, 1819 3:4
Public sale.
Will be sold, at public auction, at Westmoreland courthouse, on Monday the 29th day of March, 769 acres of valuable land, lying in said county, about 6 miles below Nomony Ferry, on the main road leading to Kinsale, Northumberland court house, &c. &c. and is contiguous to the navigable waters of Machodoc and Yiocomoco creeks. At least 3/4 of this land is in wood, 139 acres of which is in original growth of Oak and Hickory timber, the balance is well set with pine and cedar, all of which is rendered valuable by its central situation, being convenient to all markets of the waters of the Chesapeake, and particularly of those of the District of Columbia. This land is well watered, the situation healthy, and in an agreeable neighborhood. Terms of sale will be one-forth of the purchase money in hand, the balance in three equal annual installments, with legal interest which will cease as each installment is paid. Payment assured with bonds of security, and with mortgage on the whole property until final payment. Persons disposed to purchase can view the lands by application to Mr. John Murphy, senior, residing near the premises.
Thomas Ap Cateshy Jones.
City of Washington, Feb. 17, 1819.

The Virginia Herald
March 20, 1819 3:4
Land for sale.
Will be sold, on the premises, to the highest bidder, on Saturday the 10th of April next, if fair, if not, the next fair day, that valuable farm containing about 800 acres, lying near the mouth of the Rappahannock River, known by the name of Lancaster Globe. This land lies on navigable water on Carter's Creek, a fine deep inlet, which large vessels can enter with ease; is fertile, well adapted to the culture of corn, wheat, rye, cotton, &c. and abounds in timber and other wood, which may be sold to great advantage-The creek abounds with fish and oysters in their seasons. Any person or persons wishing to purchase are invited to view the place before the day of sale. The land may be divided to suit purchasers, if desired. The terms will be made known on the day of sale.
Walter B. Waddey.
March 20, 1819.

The Virginia Herald
May 12, 1819 3:5
Sale.
By virtue of a deed in trust duly executed by John McNeil to the subscribers for the purposes therein mentioned, will be exposed to public sale, for ready cash, at Westmoreland Court-House, on the fourth Monday in July next, that being Westmoreland court day, the following property, to wit: That tract or parcel of land belonging to John R. McNeil, at Chitton's Cross Roads, containing about 25 acres, be the same more or less, with its improvements, a comfortable dwelling house, good kitchen, store-house, smoke-house, and other houses, all new and in good repair, with a well in the yard which affords most excellent water.-Perhaps there are few places better situated for trade than this; it lies immediately between the court-house and the Potomac River, and is about 3 miles distant from either place. Also, a young thriving apple and peach orchard, together with ten heads of cattle, and all household furniture. Such right and title will be conveyed to the purchaser as is vested in the subscribers. It is deemed unnecessary to say more respecting the property, as those persons disposed to purchase can view the property previous to the day of sale.
James Jett, M. M. Marmaduke, Trustees.
May 12, 1819.

The Virginia Herald
May 15. 1819 3:5
Valuable land for sale.
The subscriber intending to remove to the western country, offers for sale the valuable farm on which he at present resides known by the name of Poplar-Hill 4 miles from Fredericksburg, bounded on the south by the main road leading to Spotsylvania Courthouse, containing 515 acres; 300 acres of which is wood land, heavily timbered; which from the great scarcity of wood, and its contiguity to Fredericksburg renders it very valuable; the balance lays very well for farming and is in a good state of improvement; about 80 acres well taken in clover, and a sufficiency of meadow for the support of the farm. The improvements are a dwelling house, 42 feet long, 2 stories high, 6 rooms, 5 fire-places, passage portico, closets, &c. a good kitchen, meat-house, dairy, ice house, barn, stable, and every other out house necessary for the comfort and convenience of a farmer-a well of excellent water in the yard, a garden well enclosed and good orchards of choice fruit. Terms made very accommodating. Apply to the subscriber living on the premises.
Wm. Jackson, Jr.
Poplar-Hill, May 15, 1819.

The Virginia Herald
June 9, 1819 3:5
A valuable farm for sale.
The subscriber will sell his farm in Caroline county, containing 493 1/3 acres. It is bounded by a branch of the Mattapony river, and by the lands of Mr. Coghill, Lawrence Catlett, and others; it is very convenient to the Caroline Springs, as it joins that tract. The buildings consist of a comfortable dwelling house, meat and store house, a framed kitchen, with a plank floor, brick chimney and shed, an overseer's house, and good out houses, a yard and garden well enclosed, stout barns, good stable with plank floor, framed shelter, 60 feet by 12, with corn house in one end. The farm is enclosed with a good fence, and has a sufficiency of wood for its supply. The situation is as healthy as any in the state, and is as agreeable and genteel a neighborhood. As it is presumable any person wishing to purchase will previously view the land, I deem it unnecessary to say more, than that a good title will be given, and terms made accommodating. The subscriber, or-in his absence, Mr. Lawrence Catlett, will show the ]and to any gentleman wishing to purchase.
Thomas Conway.
June 9, 1819.

The Virginia Herald
June 30, 1819 3:2
For sale, The house and lot on the corner of Commerce and Charles Streets, in the occupancy of Benjamin Debaptist-the lot is 50 feet on Commerce street and 163 on Charles street. This property is so well known, that a particular description is deemed unnecessary. It has generally been considered the best stand for business in the town of Fredericksburg, and not inferior to any in the state of Virginia. The dwelling house is convenient for a family, with a store and compting room, there is an excellent dry cellar under the whole house, which, with the warehouse, will store about 1000 barrels. If the above property should not be sold by the first day of August next, it will, on that day, be offered at auction by John Debaptist.
N.B. The house is insured against loss on damage by fire.
June 30, 1819.

The Virginia Herald
July 7, 1819 3:5
For sale, The tanyard at present occupied by Mr. Cropp, belonging to the estate of Stapleton Crutchfield, together with the stock of leather, bark, &c. belonging to the yard, to which is attached 12 or 15 acres of land, with a dwelling house with two rooms below and one above, with a brick chimney, and possession given this fall. If sold the payments will be made easy. This establishment is considerable and worthy of the attention of tanners, being in a rich and populous neighborhood, and one the road which must always be the most public, leading from Washington to the south. Any person wishing to purchase would do well to make early application to Robert Crutchfield, Executor of Stapleton Crutchfield.
N.B. If this property is not sold, I will lease it for five years, or rent it.
July 7, 1819

The Virginia Herald
August 21, 1819 3:4
Valuable wood land for sale.
I purpose selling the land on which I reside, in the county of Spotsylvania, about 7 miles from Fredericksburg, adjoining the land (called Hopewell) of James Ross, the land of Philip Edge, and others about 1/4 of a mile from the turnpike road, containing (according to recent survey) 401 acres, about 300 of which is covered with wood of the original growth, amongst which is a quantity of valuable timber of various descriptions. About 100 acres are opened and enclosed. There is a great proportion of this land low and flat, but of sufficient descent to carry off the water without ditching, except the main prong of the Massaponax, which runs immediately through the premises for about 11 miles. That part of the run lying within the enclosures I have commenced bringing into a state of cultivation, and shall continue the operation until brought to a proper state to receive the seed, or the land disposed of.-On the premises are a good dwelling house and kitchen-the house has been thoroughly repaired since I purchased the land-a spring of good water, convenient to the house-an orchard, of various descriptions of fruit. The greater part of the open land being in cultivation, and which is generally called old field,-now in the proper period to view the premises (Not withstanding the severe drought) in order to form a correct opinion of the soil. Those who are disposed to purchase wood land would meet with an advantageous purchase as I am disposed to sell on reasonable terms.
Richard Johnston.
Aug. 21, 1819.

The Virginia Herald
August 28, 1819 3:5
To lease, That large & extensive three story brick building, situated on Caroline street, between the Indian Queen Tavern and the Farmers' Hotel, and immediately opposite the stage office. It is calculated for a boarding house or a large family. There is also a store and counting room, which will be rented separately if required. If it is not leased before the 1st of October next, the subscriber intends on carrying on his hair-dressing business in it as heretofore, in all its various branches. *Worker needed and carriage needed T. Carey.
(Fredericksburg) August 28.

The Virginia Herald
September 4, 1819 3:2
Land for sale.
Having determined to remove to the western country, I offer for sale, the tract of land, whereon I now reside, in Culpeper county, lying within 5 miles of the court-house, and within about 30 of Fredericksburg. The improvements on it consist of a dwelling house, sufficient for the comfortable accommodation of a family, and other necessary out houses. The dwelling house stands on a small hill which is nearly central, and commands a view of a rich and extensive meadow, and nearly all the farm. It is surrounded by handsome trees, and is within a convenient distance of a fine spring. The whole farm consists of 588 acres, lies remarkably well. The arable land is in its present state of productivity and highly susceptible of improvement from the use of plaster and clover. About 236 acres are still in wood, and covered with a variety of excellent timber. A fine stream of timber passes nearly through the middle of the farm, on which there are about 60 acres of bottom, chiefly in timothy.-For any further information or terms of sale, apply to the subscriber, residing on the premises.
Isaac Winston, Jr.
Sept. 4, 1819.

The Virginia Herald
October 2, 1819 3:3
Merchant's Mill for sale.
That fine stone mill (nearly new) situated upon tide water at Fredericksburg, in Virginia, and supplied with water from the Rappahannock river, is offered for sale. This mill, now in perfect condition for work, contains 5 pair of 6 feet in diameter burr stones-it is geared through out with cast iron wheels-is capable of making, and has manufactured 1000 barrels of flour per week, has the advantage of a great wheat market and a scow navigation from the mill (One mile) to the shipping. The terms of sale will be accommodating, and the price moderate. Apply to William Cooch, Christiani, Delaware, or at Fredericksburg, Va. to Cooch & Hollingsworth.
Oct 2.

The Virginia Herald
October 16, 1819 3:3
Land for sale.
The subscriber designing to remove to the western country, offers for sale the farm on which he lives. This tract contains 889 acres, and lies undulating throughout, with the exception of the meadow which is level. The proportion of wood land is amply sufficient for all purposes. The arable land consists of 4 productive fields centering on a lot of 12 acres, on which the buildings and orchards are placed-a meadow containing from 80 to 100 acres & three other enclosures from 40 to 60 acres, water in all. There is a good dwelling house lately built 44 by 38 feet, two stories high, four rooms on each floor, four in the cellar, and two in the garret, and other necessary buildings. This farm is well adapted to the growth of Indian corn, wheat, rye, oats, tobacco, and grass; it yields productive crops of all, and perhaps there are few farms in this section of our state which afford a more comfortable residence, or offer more eminent advantages to the farmer, planter, or grazier.-It lies on Jonah's run in Culpeper County, Virginia, within 4 miles of the courthouse, and 33 from Fredericksburg. The neighboring manufacturing mills lie, one within 4, one within 6, one within 9, one within 14, one within 15,& one within 22 miles. for the most part in the direction of Fredericksburg. Western lands situated in a suitable part of the country will be taken in part. For further particulars apply to the subscriber on the place. *The orchards are of select fruits; apples, peaches, pears, quinces, nectarines, plumbs, damsons, and cherries.
Walter C. Winston.
Oct 13.

The Virginia Herald
November 17, 1819 3:2
James river land for sale.
I again offer for sale my land in Amherst, lying on Harris's creek, a large branch of James River, and within 4 miles of Lynchburg. The tract contains 563 acres-250 are cleared and in good heart; 70 acres fresh land cleared since 1812, & 40 acres low grounds, very rich and fit for meadow; the balance is prime tobacco land, covered with excellent timber and at least 80 cords of fire wood per acre. Three loads in the summer and two in the winter can be made to Lynchburg, over a free bridge, now nearly finished, across the river. The price of the fire wood 6 dollars per cord, and a constant and steady market for all other articles. There is an excellent mill seat on the creek on which a grist and saw mill may be erected for $500, that would yield 200 barrels of toll corn; and water sufficient for any other purpose. There are two good schools in Lynchburg, one a female and the other a Latin school; and the neighborhood as healthy as any in the state, and the town the most healthy of any on the James River.-The subscriber having removed to the western country, will sell at a reduced price and give a long credit for two-thirds of the purchase money; or he will give credit for the whole, if well secured. Apply to Col. L. Dude, in Richmond, or to Robert H. Rose.
Orange C't. Ho. Nov. 17, 1819.

The Virginia Herald
November 20, 1819 4:4
Marlborough for sale.
By virtue of the powers vested in us, the subscribers, by the last will of John Cooke, deceased, of Stafford county, Virginia, we offer for sale, that valuable estate, known by the name of Marlborough. This estate contains about 630 acres-380 of which is flat land, lying in a body-100 acres valuable marsh easily reclaimed, and the residue high land, of a valuable character. It is situated in the county of Stafford, State of Virginia, commencing at the mouth of the Potomac creek, at its junction with the Potomac river, and turns up said river upwards of two miles, to the land of J. W. Bronaugh; from this point to Accokeck, one of the navigable branches of Potomac Creek.-the distance is 5/8 of a mile; thus leaving the tract entirely surrounded by water, except on the last mentioned line. This is perhaps the most desirable estate on the eastern section of Virginia, its soil is not surpassed by any for the production of the staple articles of the state; abounds with springs of excellent water and is particularly adapted to the growth of red clover. The winter and spring fisheries have produced a nett profit of $2,500 per annum.-Wild fowl is in abundance, and there are on the land inexhaustible beds of shell marl, which have been pronounced by English Farmers, to be superior to any known in Europe. There have been seeded this fall, 135 bushels of wheat, and a few acres in rye. It is distant from the markets of the district of Columbia 45 miles and from Fredericksburg 11 miles. Possession may be had the 1st of January, 1820, and the terms made accommodating. A more minute description is deemed unnecessary, as it is presumed those who may wish to purchase this valuable property will view it.-Application may be made to John W. or Jere. Bronaugh, Georgetown, District of Columbia, John W, Green, Fredericksburg, or either of the subscribers residing at West Farm, near, Aquia.
John Cooke, George Mason Cooke.
Nov. 13, 1819.

The Virginia Herald
December 18, 1819 3:4
Port Royal property for sale.
The subscriber is authorized to dispose of that valuable property in the town of Port Royal, belonging to Thomas N. Berryman, Esq formerly occupied by Mr. Newton Berryman, on which Mr. Thomas Gutherie now resides. This property consists of two full half acre lots of land, on which is a comfortable dwelling house, kitchen, &c a store house, to which is annexed two rooms very suitable for a grocery retail house. Also, an excellent granary, 54 feet long by 16 feet wide, situated on the edge of the river.-There is on this land an excellent never failing spring. A more minute description of this property is deemed unnecessary as it is presumed any person disposed to purchase will first view the premises. The terms of sale will be liberal; good bonds endorsed by the purchaser will be received in part, if not the whole of the purchase money.
Geo. White Port Conway, Dec. 18, 1819.

The Virginia Herald
February 23, 1820 3:5
For sale, A beautiful small farm, lying in Spotsylvania County, about 9 miles from Fredericksburg, on the Richmond Road, and adjoining the land of Capt. James Holiday, containing 320 acres; 100 acres in wood land, the balance in an excellent state of improvement. There is on it a good dwelling house, and other necessary houses in good repair; an excellent never failing spring and a stone spring house, 150 yards form the dwelling house. There is likewise a good, thriving, young orchard of apple and peach trees, just beginning to bear. The situation is very healthy, and therefore very desirable; and would suit any man living in Fredericksburg, who wishes to have a summer retreat. For terms apply to the subscriber, living on the farm, or to Mr. Robert Mackay, living in Fredericksburg. Also, a small tract of land, of 207 acres, lying 10 miles above Spotsylvania Courthouse, adjoining the land of Mr. Joshua Long and others; formerly belonging to John Crooks. Through this tract runs a never failing stream of water, on which there has been a grist mill, but now out of repair. Any person wishing to purchase this tract may get a great bargain and liberal credit, by applying to Robert Swan.
Feb. 23, 1820.

The Virginia Herald
March 1, 1820 3:5
Marmion for sale.
This desirable and airy situation, in King George county, Virginia, will be offered for sale on Wednesday the 29th of March, on the premises, to the highest bidder. One fourth of the purchase money will be required when possession is given, the balance in 1, 2, and 3 years; payments to be well secured in such a manner as will be made known on the day of sale. Possession will be given on the 1st day of April, the proprietor to have the privilege of securing the growing crop of wheat. This tract of land contains 1000 acres, and will be sold by the acre, and surveyed to the purchaser immediately after the sale. It lies within a half a mile of Potomac, where there is a good landing from which the produce of the farm may be shipped to Alexandria, Washington city, and Baltimore. This land is well adapted to the culture of corn, wheat tobacco, and clover; there is about 500 acres cleared, the balance in wood, for which a good price may always be had at the landing. This property will be found an object to a purchaser, as it will be sold at a price probably less than what the timber alone would produce. On this land there is a large commodious two story dwelling house, with five rooms on each floor, with every necessary out house, a spacious garden with a variety of choice fruit, &c. a small grist mill which has been profitable, but at present wants some repair- a large apple orchard from which 120 barrels of cider were made three years since, and sold at $7 per barrel, and the last year 75 barrels were made, and nearly all sold at the same price, although not more than one half the apples could be saved. Any person disposed to purchase a good farm, in a desirable neighborhood, will perhaps never have it in their power to purchase so valuable a one on such easy terms as the one now offered for sale. In addition to this farm may be had 500 acres adjoining. On this land is a new dwelling house with all the necessary out houses for a small family; a never failing spring close to the house. The farm houses, barn, stable, corn-houses and shelters, all new, well constructed, and of the best materials, -in short, this farm is now in the highest state of improvement, and not inferior in point of soil and production to any tract of land in the northern neck; These lands will be shewn to any person disposed to purchase at any time previous to the sale, by the subscriber living on the premises, or his son, Daingerfield Lewis, living adjoining. *Lists personal estate for sale G. Lewis.
Marmion, March 1, 1820.

The Virginia Herald
March 18, 1820 3:5
For sale, or exchange for property in town, Feeling desirous to move into town for the education of a young family, I offer for sale, or exchange, the farm, whereon I live, situated in Lancaster County, Virginia, about 4 miles from the Rappahannock River, the same distance from the court-house, 12 miles from the Potomac, and the same distance from the Chesapeake bay, near the line of the three counties of Lancaster, Richmond, and Northumberland, containing 220 acres, more or less, of which about 120 acres are in wood, oak, chestnut and pine, the residue under good chestnut fences. The quality of the soil in point of fertility, is equal to any in the neighborhood, for the production of corn and small grain, and the peculiar healthiness of the situation. The improvements are a two story comfortable dwelling house, kitchen, dairy, stable, and barn, a good garden in fine order for gardening, a thriving apple orchard of good quality. The farm is in excellent order for cultivation. There is a sufficiency of meadow ground in a good state, producing good hay. No place can be more desirable for a medical or any other professional gentleman on account of its contiguity to three counties, and agreeable neighborhood. A comfortable house and garden in a pleasant part of town, would be taken in exchange at fair value. Persons desirous of purchasing will first view the property, which they are invited to do by the subscriber.
Fereol Lemoine.
March 18, 1820.

The Virginia Herald
March 25, 1820 3:5
For rent, That well known stand for a store, at Mattox Bridge, in Westmoreland county. The store house is large and convenient with a cellar and a large granary. -There is perhaps no better country stand in the state for dry goods and grocery business. The neighborhood is genteel and healthy, and large quantities of corn and wheat may be purchased annually. For terms apply to the subscriber near the premises.
Daniel Carmicheal.
Hickory-Hill, March 25, 1820.

The Virginia Herald
April 8, 1820 1:1
Hayfield for sale.
This very desirable estate was offered for sale some time ago, and I am induced to believe that it was a pretty general opinion that I was not in earnest, I again present it to the attention of those that want to purchase, and assure the public my wish is to sell. This tract contains about 2000 acres, and is one among the most desirable seats on the Rappahannock, commanding a full view of the river. As I suspect no one will purchase without first viewing it, I will only mention a few of its recommendations -healthiness of situation, fertility of soil; a large two story brick house, with all other necessary out houses, meadow land enough to make 100 tons of hay, which can very easily be reclaimed. There is a very good meadow, already improved, and a good deal more may be sowed this fall, with the privilege of seeding wheat; a great variety of choice fruit, very fine spring near the house, also an ice house. The land will be shown by myself, or in my absence by my son Lewis, when the terms of sale will be made known.
Hay Battaile April 5, 1820.

The Virginia Herald
April 15, 1820 3:3
To undertakers.
Will be let to the lowest bidder, on Monday the 8th of May, at the Bowling Green, being Caroline Court Day, the building of a new jail, at that place, 20 feet square, two stories high, of brick, with a brick arch over the first story, supported by timbers 6 by 12, of oak, and bars of iron at least 1/4 of an inch thick, in the manner described in the plan of the building, which will be shown on the day of letting. The doors and windows all to be well secured with iron. The repairs necessary to the old jail will also be let at the same time -Bond with approved security will be required by The Commissioners.
Bowling Green, April 15, 1820.

The Virginia Herald
April 15, 1820 3:5
The subscribers, having an intention of removing from Germanna, wish to dispose of their very valuable property there, which they will do by public sale, to the highest bidder, on Saturday the 27th day of May next. This property consists of a highly productive farm of 288 acres, in an improved state of cultivation, with extensive orchards of selected fruit, and in fine order in every respect. The buildings consist of a commodious dwelling house, with all necessary offices, an ice house, and an excellent barn, stables, and carriage house. Attached to this farm are the Germanna Mills, now in complete order, running two pair of 5 feet burrs, and one pair of country stones. -The burr stones are quite new and of the first quality, and the whole of the machinery and geers complete and new. These mills are immediately upon and furnished with water from the Rapid-Ann, the largest fork of the Rappahannock River, and on the great road to Fredericksburg market from the fertile counties of Culpeper, Madison, and Shenandoah, from whence any quantity of wheat that may be wanted can readily be obtained. The distance from market 20 miles, 15 of which are turnpiked. -The abundant supply of water at all seasons renders these mills more valuable perhaps than any in this part of the country and its proximity to market makes it quite convenient to carry on an extensive business. -A further description of the property is deemed unnecessary, as it is so generally known in this part of the country, and persons from a distance desirous of purchasing are invited to view the premises before the day of sale. The terms of sale will be $3,000 to be paid at the time of purchase, $3,000 the first day of January next, and the balance in four equal annual installments from the day of sale with interest thereon. An undoubted title will be made to the property on the receipt of the second payment, and a deed of trust required for the discharge of the distant payments as they become due. Possession will be given of the mills and miller's house on the first day of June next, and of the farm on the first of December, or as soon as the growing crops can be got off.
Eliason & Brown.
April 15, 1820.

The Virginia Herald
June 7, 1820 3:3
Montpeloso for sale.
This is a beautiful situation for a private family. The dwelling house is three stories high. The first story contains a dining room 30 by 20 feet, & a cellar 30 by 10 feet. -The second has a drawing room, chamber and large passage. -The third three rooms and an entry. Two acres of land will be let with the house, with all convenient out houses. Possession given immediately. Also, could be put in order, two large store and counting rooms, and a small house and lot for a family. Also, 1,000 acres of land well timbered, and lying 3 or 4 miles distant, which may be laid off in lots to suit purchasers.
Paul Verdier & Son.
June 7, 1820.

The Virginia Herald
June 21, 1820 3:5
Notice to builders.
The undersigned commissioners will attend at the tavern of John Maddox, in the County of Prince William, on Saturday the 22d of July, for the purpose of letting to the lowest bidder, the building of a court-house, for the said county, of the following dimensions and materials, viz: 40 feet by 30 of brick or stone, (if the latter to be rough cast) 20 feet pitch, walls of the foundation 2 feet thick, and above 22 1/2 inches, scantling of good white oak, and covered with cypress shingles, of the best quality. Also- a clerk's office, 36 feet by 16, of brick or stone, (if the latter to be rough cast) pitch to the roof 18 feet, walls as above, and to be covered with slate. Also- a jail, 36 feet by 30, of stone, pitch 17 feet, walls of the foundation 2 1/2 feet thick, and 2 feet above, scantling of good white oak, criminals apartments to be well lined with timber, and the roof to be covered with cypress shingles of the best quality. As would be tedious to go into detail of the internal structure of the said buildings, the commissioners will, on the day above mentioned, submit a plan, and if undertakers desire, will adjourn for a few days to give them an opportunity to prepare their estimates. Bond and security in double the amount will be required for the faithful execution of the contract.
John Linton, Gerard Alexander, Jr. Bernard Hooe, Jr.
June 21, 1820.

The Virginia Herald
July 19, 1820 3:5
Potomac land and valuable mill for sale.
On the 31st of August, I will offer at public sale the following valuable property, viz. -One farm of about 800 acres, 500 of which are bottom, a considerable portion of it fresh land, with an ample proportion of wood. The soil is excellent, suited to tobacco, small grain, grass and corn, and from trial is capable of rapid improvement by plaster. To this farm is attached 30 acres of reclaimed and, formerly marsh, but now diked, sliced and drained, and from experience capable of producing three tons of timothy, or 50 bushels of wheat to the acre It is now in such train that it can be brought into cultivation next year. One other farm of 500 acres, all bottom land, with an adequate supply of wood. The soil is similar to that of the tract above described; and to this farm is also attached 55 to 60 acres of first rate meadow land; 40 acres of which is marsh, like the one reclaimed, mentioned above, and may be drained at trivial expense. Also- one other tract of 500 acres, nearly all in woods or fresh. The wood sufficiently near the river to render it an object for market. On this tract there is a merchant and grist mill, on a never failing stream, remarkable for its constancy in the severest droughts. There are two pair of burr stones, with Evan's improvements: the machinery was put into complete repair last year. The mill house is large and commodious, and built in the best manner, of free stone, taken from the tract. The dwelling house with some repair would suit a large family. A grocery and dry goods store, established at this place some years since did a good business- this being one of the most convenient places of deposit, whence the produce of the neighborhood and back country is shipped to the District of Columbia. It is distant from the Fauquier Court House, 35 or 40 miles. The two first tracts bind on the Potomac River and Aquia Creek, for more than two miles; which here abound with rock, shad, herring, white perch, and wild fowl. These three tracts are distant from the District of Columbia about 35 miles and from Fredericksburg about 16 or 17 -not so low down as to be liable to the depredations of an enemy during war. The freight to the District of Columbia is from 3 to 4 cents per bushel, and from one dollar to one dollar and fifty cents per ton. The steam boat passes by every day. This property being advantageously situated, of a very valuable description, and immediately on the margin of one of our finest rivers, it may not be unworthy of the attention of those living in that section of the country, where the expense of transportation equal or exceed the expense of cultivation. On the score of health, I shall only observe that a farm immediately adjoining those offered for sale, and similarly situated, has for the last three years been occupied by blacks, born and bred in the upper country, and for the last two years by a family from Alexandria, and that they have been uncommonly healthy. The terms will be accommodating, and more fully made known on the day of sale, which will take place at the mill. In the mean time the property will be shewn by P.S. -These tracts are all contiguous and would suit one purchaser. W. B.
Wm . Brent, Jr.
Richland, near Aquia, Va. July 19, 1820.

The Virginia Herald
August 9, 1820 1:2
Trust sale.
In pursuance of a deed in trust executed to the subscribers by William Barker and his wife, for certain purposes in the said deed mentioned, we shall offer at public sale, to the highest bidder, on Saturday the 21st day of September next, the lot of land and houses, thereon lately occupied by the said William Barker. The lot contains 10 acres of highly improved land, well enclosed; the situation is healthy and beautiful; the distance from town is about three quarters of a mile; the dwelling is of brick, containing 4 rooms and a kitchen; there are a good smoke house, corn house, &c- also, a large and well constructed ice house, a well of excellent water, and an extensive and productive garden. On the premises, is also a two story brick house, fronting the Turnpike road, which at a small expense might be made a good dwelling and may be detached from the rest of the property without disadvantage, and rented at a good price. A very liberal credit will be allowed on the greater part of the purchase money. The subscribers will treat with any person at private sale for said property and will convey such a title as is invested in them as Trustees.
Wm. Gordon & Wm. Allen, Trustees.
July 8, 1820.

The Virginia Herald
August 23, 1820 3:4
For sale or rent.
The subscriber offers for sale or rent, the much admired little farm, where he now lives, containing about 70 acres. On it is a convenient dwelling house, three rooms with three fire places, a good meat house, a kitchen, spring house with an excellent spring about 30 yards from the dwelling house. -also, a good store house with three rooms and one fire place, a good blacksmith's shop, with two chimneys. From the many advantages attached to this place, it would suit a merchant, a mechanic, or a tavern-keeper. This lot lies on a public road leading from Aquia to Fauquier Court House, -it is about 7 miles from Aquia, 15 from Dumfries, and about 14 from Falmouth. Should this place not be sold or rented all together, before the 20th of September, the store house can be rented separate. *Goods for sale.
Robert Taylor.
Springfield, Stafford Co.
August 23, 1820

The Virginia Herald
September 6, 1820 3:5
Land for sale.
Intending to leave this neighborhood, the subscriber will sell the farm on which he resides, called Woodland, containing about 1000 acres of land, a large portion of which is well timbered. The timbered land is at each end of the farm, and it will admit of an advantageous division to suit purchasers. There will be seeded this fall upwards of 100 acres of wheat and rye; and 20 or 30 acres of meadow land will be sowed down in timothy. This tract of land commences about three quarters of a mile from Fredericksburg, and is bounded by Swift Run Gap Turnpike Road. The buildings are all in the best repair, and very well situated for the convenience and comfort of a family; many of them are new and well built of excellent materials. The garden and yard are well enclosed. In the former there are a variety of fine fruit trees, and adjoining it a thriving young peach orchard. The terms of payment will be accommodating.
J. S. Thornton.
Sept. 6, 1820.

The Virginia Herald
September 20, 1820 3:5
Farm for sale.
Anxious to settle in the Alabama Territory, I shall offer my farm, containing 420 acres, at public auction, on the 15th day of October next. Sedley Lodge, lies 5 miles below Orange Court house, adjoining the farm of William C. Willis Francis W. Taliaferro, and others, within 2 miles of the Swift Run Turnpike, and is surpassed by no farm of its size in the county of Orange. The lands have been highly clovered and plastered. This land I will offer in a divided state or otherwise, as may most please the bidders -it will make two beautiful little farms: on each would be comfortable buildings. That part on which the subscriber lives, has a dwelling house with 5 large rooms, portico and porch, kitchen, weaving room, store room, meat house ice house, pigeon house, wheat machine, barn and stable - in fact every convenience a man could well wish and all new. The fertility of the soil will be judged of from the product the subscriber expects to make from grain; 500 bushels to each hand. I invite all persons who may be disposed to purchase to attend to my house on the day of sale; and would strongly advise such persons who may reside in a sickly country, to avail themselves of this opportunity of selecting one among the most beautiful and healthy farms that may be offered for sale for many years- situated in the most delightful neighborhood that could be desired. The terms will be made known on the day. I also offer at private sale, my mill property, lying in about one and a half miles from this farm. At this mill any quantity of wheat can be purchased that would be necessary to keep her grinding through the year, and 27,000 bushels have been ground on toll. The value of this property is so well known that it is unnecessary to add more than this mill is all cast mettle machinery, of the newest construction.
Geo. W. Spotswood.
Sept. 20, 1820.

The Virginia Herald
September 30, 1820 3:4
Bargain.
I will sell my tavern establishment, at Culpeper Court-House, upon the following terms: -$1000 cash, the balance in four equal annual payments, without interest, and possession given the 1st of December next -the title perfect, and consisting of the following buildings, viz: large and commodious house with four rooms below stairs and eight above, with two large porticoes- a new smoke house, a new ice house, a new house 16 feet square for the reception of servants, a good granary, an excellent well completely fixed, a first rate stable with 64 stalls, a good kitchen under the house,with a covered way to the dining room, a good garden and neat yard, with trees, &c. around the whole establishment. -The house is in complete order, and painted white with green Venetian blinds.
John Gray, Jr.
Culpeper Court-House, Sept. 30, 1820.

The Virginia Herald
September 30, 1820 3:4
Land for sale.
The subscriber wishes to dispose of his estate, lying on the Potomac river, in the county of Westmoreland, adjoining the lands of Alexander Berryman, Daniel Carmichael, and the estate of James Harvey -containing about 400 acres. A part of this tract is very heavily timbered -there is a brick dwelling and other necessary buildings for the accommodation of a family. This farm lies level, and would, under proper management, produce excellent crops. -There are on it, immense beds of oyster shells, which would furnish endless supplies of improvement Good bonds, now due, and satisfactorily endorsed, would be received in payment. A further description is thought unnecessary as it is to be presumed that any person wishing to purchase would first view it. For terms apply to Wm. Bernard Sen, P. Lightfoot, or myself.
Wm. Bernard, Jr.
Sept. 30, 1820.

The Virginia Herald
September 30, 1820 3:5
Public sale.
My house and lot, situated on Water-street, two stories high, with an excellent cellar, calculated for a kitchen, with an improved garden, front 110, running back 137 feet, eligible for a man following the water, or Captain of the Port; will be sold at public auction, the 30th of this month (Saturday) Terms, one half cash, the balance in 6 months, with lien on the property to secure the last payment.
G. D. Storke.
(Fredericksburg) Sept. 13, 1820.

The Virginia Herald
October 7, 1820 3:5
Notice.
In order to discharge more punctually the duties of sheriff, I have determined to remove my residence to Fredericksburg, and will rent for one or more years, my plantation in this county, about 9 miles distant from town, called Hickory Point -This farm contains upwards of 400 acres of land, one half of which is cleared and under good fencing, and is capable of producing fine crops of corn, wheat and tobacco. There are on this land, a large framed house for a family, a good Overseer's house, and also a new and excellent barn. About 100 acres of this land are now set in clover. I will also rent 45 acres adjoining the above farm, upon which there is an excellent dwelling house, and other out houses, with a good orchard. The water, on both these places, is as good as any in the county. *personal property for rent or sale.
P.S. I would prefer taking a share of the crops made on the land to receiving the rent in money.
Flavius S. Noel.
October 7, 1820.

The Virginia Herald
October 7, 1820 3:5
For sale, or rent, for a term of years, A tract of land, situated on Kettle Run, in Prince William County, adjoining the lands of the late Richard Brent, Esq. and Col. Gerard Alexander, containing 500 acres, one third of which is heavily timbered, mostly with red oak and hickory, the other is in cultivation and is productive. This land is distant about 3 miles from the situation selected for the building of the courthouse. It is very susceptible to improvement, particularly by the use of clover and plaster. -it is immediately in the neighborhood of several manufacturing mills, and about 20 miles from the Occoquan Mills, and 30 from Alexandria. Terms made known by application to the subscriber, living near Barron's Post office, Prince William County, Va.
John Fitzhugh.
Oct. 7, 1820.

The Virginia Herald
November 1, 1820 3:3
Sedley Lodge, Not having been sold as advertised, is now offered at private sale. This farm is certainly among the most valuable of its size in Orange, is situated 5 miles below the courthouse, adjoining the farm of Wm. C. Willis, F. W. Taliaferro, and others- 2 miles from Swift Run Turnpike, and 35 from Fredericksburg -The society surpassed by none in the state, country healthy, beautiful and productive, Buildings, all new, plain, but useful and convenient -price moderate, and terms of payment generous. Nothing would induce the subscriber to sell this beautiful little farm but the anxiety to provide (better) for a large family in some new country. My mill property is also offered for sale, the machinery cast metal, and of the latest construction -This mill has ground in toll 27,000 bushels wheat, and as much can be bought as would keep her running throughout the year, I can say with truth, this is the most valuable mill in the upper country. I own but one half this property, Mr. Robert Mackey, merchant, Fred'g, owns the other half. The terms will be generous and price moderate -Letters addressed to the subscriber, Orange court house, will be attended to.
Geo. W. Spotswood.
Nov. 1, 1820.

The Virginia Herald
November 1, 1820 3:4
Public sale of Marlborough.
This farm, containing 350 acres of flat, 180 of first rate high ground, and 100 of uncommonly dry marsh, that may be reclaimed at very small expense, will be offered at public sale, before the door of Mr. Young's Tavern, in the town of Fredericksburg, on Thursday the 30th day of November. Marlborough has natural advantages greater than any farm known to the subscribers, on the Potomac, abounding with beds of superior shell marl, springs of most excellent water, fisheries that alone would render this place valuable, and is bounded by the navigable waters of the Potomac river, Potomac creek, Aquia creek, and Accokeek Creek, so as to make a fence of 3/8 of a mile only necessary to enclose the whole farm. Marlborough is healthy, excelled by no farm in the state in fertility and productiveness, easily cultivated, laid off in convenient lots, double ditched, and under good cedar fencing, is distant from the markets of the District of Columbia 40, and Fredericksburg 11 miles -about 200 bushels of grain was seeded this fall. The stream boat Washington anchors off this place daily. *Slaves for sale Terms of sale, one third on the day of sale, and the residue in two equal annual payments. A correct plat of the land will be left at the Bar of Mr. Young's Tavern previous to the day of sale, and the land shewn by the resident on the place.
John Cooke, George M. Cooke, Ex'ors of J. Cooke, dec'd.
Stafford, Nov. 1, 1820.

The Virginia Herald
November 4, 1820 3:4
This tract of land, lying in the county of Westmoreland, contains by recent survey, between 13 and 1400 acres; about 600 of which are low grounds of superior quality. The balance is barren land, covered with oak and hickory. It is situated near the banks of the Potomac and within one mile of Mattox Creek, which is navigable for vessels of considerable burthen. The soil is remarkable for its fertility: and I think well adapted to the production of tobacco. There is a brick house (a little out of repair) sufficiently commodious for the accommodation of a small family, with an excellent meat house and dairy, and a well of fine water within 30 yards of the house. I know of no establishment in the lower country which offers greater inducements to the farmer or planter- Within a mile of the dwelling house is a manufacturing mill, situated on one of the best streams in the Northern Neck, with 100 acres of land attached to it, which I also offer for sale. The terms will be moderate and the payments easy. For particulars apply to the subscriber, now at Haywood, Westmoreland county.
Lawrence Washington.
Nov. 4, 1820.

The Virginia Herald
January 5, 1822 3:4
Valuable land for sale.
The subscriber will sell upon reasonable terms, the farm on which he lives, containing between 5 and 600 acres, near Boyd's Hole, on the Potomac, in King George County. The farm is of excellent soil, lies wavy, and has an abundance of heavy timber, and about 50 acres of valuable meadow land, well drained as any in the country. The buildings are a frame dwelling with three rooms and a passage on the lower floor, and the same on the second, with the necessary out houses, stables, overseer's house, and houses for Negroes. As it is presumed any person disposed to purchase, will first view the premises, a more minute description is deemed unnecessary.
David Stuart January 5, 1822.

The Virginia Herald
January 19, 1822 3:5
For sale, 769 acres of land, lying in the county of Westmoreland, about 6 miles below Nomony Ferry, on the main road leading to Kinsale, Northumberland Courthouse, &c. and is contiguous to the navigable waters of Machodoc and Yeocomico creeks. At least 3/4 of this land is in wood; 139 acres of which is in original growth of oak and hickory timber -the balance is well set with pine and cedar; all of which is rendered valuable by its central situation, being convenient to all the markets on the waters of the Chesapeake, and particularly to those in the District of Columbia. This land is well watered, the situation healthy, and in an agreeable neighborhood. For terms apply to John Murry, near the premises, or Thos. Ap Catsby Jones, Washington City.
Jan. 19, 1822.

The Virginia Herald
March 23, 1822 3:5
Villeboro for sale.
The subscriber will sell this valuable stand for a country store and tavern, situated in the county of Caroline, on the great post road from Fredericksburg to Richmond, 14 miles from the former place and 54 from the latter. The establishment consist of a large and convenient tavern, a house in the back yard for the accommodation of a proprietor's family, with a kitchen under the same; ice house, smoke house, and other necessary out houses; a store house with a counting room and lodging room attached to it and a warehouse that will contain upwards of 2000 bushels grain. -There are 322 acres of land on this tract, on which there are two tenements that have generally rented well to mechanics. Persons disposed to purchase are invited to view the premises. Terms can be known by application to the subscriber, living in one mile of this place.
W. Woodford, Jr.
March 23, 1822.

The Virginia Herald
April 17, 1822 3:5
Valuable town property for sale.
The subscriber wishes to sell that good stand for business, now in the occupancy of Mr. Grismond, and situated four doors above the Virginia Bank, and adjoining the house of the late Mr. Thos. Ware. This property consists of a good two story fire proof house, kitchen, smoke house, ware house, and garden sufficiently large for a common size family. -commencing at the main street, and running back to Water street, subject to a ground rent of $43 per annum. The terms of sale, 6, 12, & 18 months credit, with a lien on the property until the last payment is made. Any person wishing to view the property, can be accommodated by applying to the occupant. For further particulars call on the subscriber.
Wm. James.
Fred'g. April 17.

The Virginia Herald
April 24, 1822 3:5
A valuable mill and farm for sale.
The property whereon the subscriber now resides, on the river Ny, 10 miles south of Fredericksburg, in Spotsylvania County, viz: The mill, newly built all of the best materials, 40 feet square, with 5 floors, with 2 pair of stones now in operation; one of which is of the first quality Burr, 5 feet, 6 in diameter -the other a pair of Cologne stones, with a space for a third pair, and most of the machinery necessary for the same now ready; with two water wheels, and the middle pair of stones fixed to run by either wheel, with all other necessary improvements, as elevators, hopperbay, screen and bolts, all nearly new. On the land is a convenient small dwelling house and kitchen, a store house and other necessary out houses. The farm consists of 171 acres, a part of which is in three fields of about 40 acres each, and the remainder in wood land -the whole in a flourishing state of improvement. Any person wishing to become a purchaser of this valuable property may know the terms by applying to Mr. Robert Mackay, or Mr. George Cox, Fredericksburg, or to the subscriber living on the premises.
Robert Swan.
April 24, 1822.

The Virginia Herald
May 15, 1822 1:2
Potomac land for sale Pursuant to the last will of the late Col. John Stewart, of Westmoreland county Virginia, I shall offer for sale on Tuesday the 6th of August next, if fair, otherwise, the next fair day, at 1 o'clock, P.M. on the premises, that pleasant and commodious seat called White Point. This estate, containing nearly 500 acres, is situated immediately on the banks of the Potomac river, in the aforesaid county, and is bounded by this river and Monroe's creek, a navigable branch of the same, for at least two thirds of the tract, thereby saving the farmer great labour and expense in the article of fencing. There are two comfortable dwelling houses, with necessary out houses, on the farm; and to accommodate purchasers, it would be divided, provided the whole could be disposed of. For corn, the soil is equal to any in the neighborhood, and for wheat it is inferior to none in the Northern Neck, it being less liable to rust, &c. as it is supposed from some peculiarity of its atmosphere. Fish, oysters, and wild fowl in their seasons may in great abundance be easily procured; and in the spring, the herring fishery attached to this farm may be rented very profitable. Terms of sale will be, one-third of the purchase money at 12 months; one third in 2 years; and the balance in three years. The installments to be secured by a deed in trust on the property. The subscriber being authorized to sell at either public or private bargain, will receive proposals for the above property at any time previous to the day of sale Should private sale be effected, the public will be duly notified thereof. On the same terms, and at the same time and place, I will also sell a small tract of wood land about two miles from the river, heavily timbered. Possession will be given on the first day of January next, with the privilege of seeding wheat this fall. Should the above property not be sold, it will be rented, to the highest bidder on the evening of the aforesaid day, for the ensuing year, under certain conditions then to be made known.
B. F. Stewart.
Ex'or of John Stewart, deceased.
May 4, 1822.

The Virginia Herald
July 17, 1822 3:4
Valuable farm for sale.
My farm, in the county of Culpeper, late the property of Charles Carter, Esq is offered for sale. This valuable farm lies about 7 miles east of the court- house, on Norman's Ford road, adjoining the lands of Wm. C. Carter, Esq. and others, containing by a recent survey 1493 acres, in a wealthy and genteel neighborhood; the improvements are spacious and comfortable, in good repair for the reception of a large family, the situation high and healthy, excellent water, the soil well adapted to the growth of small grain, corn, tobacco, and grass. I deem it unnecessary to say anything further, as those wishing to purchase, will no doubt view the premises, which will be shewn by Mr. George Ross, residing thereon, who will receive proposals for the purchase. The terms will be accommodating - a long credit will be given for a portion of the purchase money, or stock of the Virginia or Farmers' Bank, received in payment.
Thomas Goodwin.
July 17, 1822.

The Virginia Herald
July 17, 1822 3:5
Trust sale.
By virtue of a deed in trust from Flavius S. Noel and Ann his wife to the subscriber, to secure a debt due to Robert Crutchfield, which deed bears date the 6th day of September, 1821, and is duly recorded in the office of the county court of Spotsylvania, I shall on Friday the 30th day of August next, at the tavern of Samuel Alsop, proceed to sell for cash, to the highest bidder, the tract of land, on which the said Noel lately resided, being the same of which he purchased of Samuel Alsop, containing about 405 acres- on which there are two convenient dwelling houses, well calculated for small families, a new barn, and a young apple orchard, now bearing. Also, one other small tract, adjoining thereto, containing about 37 1/2 acres upon which there is a good dwelling house and kitchen; two as good springs of water as any in the county, with a very productive apple orchard -These two tracts taken together would make a farm as desirable as any in the neighborhood. They lie within 10 miles of Fredericksburg, and 4 of Spotsylvania Court-House. *Slaves for sale.
N.B. -The land will be shewn to any person wishing to view it by Burrell Peavell, or Lewis W. Dangerfield, both of whom live very near the premises.
Carter L. Stevenson, Trustee.
July 17, 1822.

The Virginia Herald
July 20, 1822 3:3
Land for sale.
I will offer at public sale on the premises, on Tuesday, the 20th of August next the farm, known by the name of Haydon's Old Place, situated on the Fredericksburg and Culpeper Turnpike Road, 5 miles from Fredericksburg. There are 239 acres of land, 120 of which are cleared-the balance in good oak timber. A very good selection of fruit trees. The improvements are a pretty good dwelling house, with some small out-houses. This farm is well watered, and the timbered land very valuable, in consequence of its nearness to Fredericksburg, and a good turnpike road to travel over. Conditions will be reasonable, and fully made known on the day of sale. An indisputable title will be made to the land.
Joseph Stricker.
New-Market, Va. July 20, 1822.

The Virginia Herald
July 31, 1822 3:5
A farm & merchant mill for sale.
Will be sold, to the highest bidder, on the 10th day of September next, the farm on which Wm. Gaines lately resided, in the county of Stafford and State of Virginia, containing 550 acres. This land is within 8 miles of Dumfries, 20 of Fredericksburg, and 30 of Alexandria. It has on it a very comfortable dwelling house, and other convenient out houses, a valuable apple orchard, a spring of excellent water convenient to the house and the situation is remarkably healthy, the soil well adapted to the growth of Indian corn, wheat & clover, and is considered good plaster land; about 50 acres is rich meadow land, with a never failing stream running through it. It has a sufficient quantity of wood land. At the same time will be sold half the valuable merchant and grist mill, on a never failing stream, with 45 acres of land adjoining. This mill is contiguous to the above farm. The terms of sale will be one third of the purchase money paid on the day of sale, the balance in two equal annual installments. Bonds with approved security will be required and a lien on the property to secure the payments. Privilege of seeding will be allowed, and possession will be given at the end of the year. Sale to take place on the premises.
Richard H. Gaines.
July 31, 1822.

The Virginia Herald
August 3, 1822 3:4
For sale or exchange, A farm on the Potomac, in the county of Westmoreland, containing by estimation, between 11 and 1200 acres, called Cabin-Point. This property has always been considered equal to any on the river, and has been for several years, by the exclusion of stock, in a very considerable state of improvement -An exchange is the most desirable; no farm however would be received containing less than 400 acres of good land, with improvements; nor, if in the Northern Neck, lying below the county of King George. -Should a suitable farm be offered inferior to Cabin point, either in quantity or quality, the subscriber would be willing to receive the difference in labour; or, if estimated in money, would extend to its payment any indulgence which could reasonably be required; which indulgence might be extended also, should there be no exchange, to the whole amount, on a small portion being paid down, and satisfactory security being given for the punctual liquidation of the residue of the principal and interest as they come due. -No one, it is presumed, will view this property, although it is in a very loose state of cultivation, and be disappointed; as it possesses every advantage of fertility, beauty, and convenience, and which nothing but the want of competent capital and labour could ever have possibly induced the subscriber to have thrown it into market. -To a gentleman of fortune living in the District of Columbia, who desires to derive from an estate all the luxuries as well as necessities of the country, Cabin-Point would be valuable. About 250 acres are in corn, which the purchaser could have the liberty of seeding in wheat; or which, probably, might be seeded for him. Letters, post paid, will receive immediate attention.
Thomas Bowand.
Cabin-Point, near Westm'd Courthouse.
Aug. 3, 1822.

The Virginia Herald
September 18, 1822 3:5
Land for sale.
By virtue of a deed in trust from James Edmunds to me, bearing date the 8th day of July, 1822, I shall proceed to sell at Warrenton, on the 9th day of October next, that valuable tract of land, on which the said Edmund resides, situated in the county of Fauquier, about 3 miles from Warrenton, containing 475 acres, more or less, -This land is situated in a healthy, pleasant and agreeable neighborhood; it is in a good state of cultivation, highly susceptible of improvements, and from small experiments made, well adapted to the use of clover and plaster. The improvements consist of a commodious dwelling house, stone kitchen, brick meat house, dairy, ice house, a large and convenient barn (70 feet by 40) the lower part of which is built of stone and conveniently divided with stone partition, to suit the different kinds of stock; there is also an excellent garden, well laid off and highly improved, a large apple orchard, with a variety of excellent fruit trees, and a well of good water within a few yards of the door. There will also be prepared and ready for seeding, about 80 acres of fallow, a large part of which was in clover and plastered the last spring. This farm is so well known that it is deemed unnecessary to detail its many advantages; it is one of the most desirable in the neighborhood. Possession will be given by Jas. Edmunds immediately.
Inman Horner, Trustee.
September 9, 1822.

The Virginia Herald
September 28, 1822 3:4
Potomac lands for sale.
By virtue of a deed bearing date the 20th day of September, 1822, executed by Robert S. Hipkins, the subscribers are authorized for the purposes in the said deed expressed, to sell by private bargain or at public auction, that valuable and highly improved estate, called Bleak Hall, lying on the Potomac river and Mattox creek, in the county of Westmoreland, containing about 1000 acres; 300 of which are river and creek low grounds, in arable condition, and the remainder well covered with oak, cedar, and pine. The improvements on this estate consist of a large and commodious two story brick dwelling house with four good rooms and a passage on a floor, in excellent repair; a mill of considerable value and great convenience to the estate, and every out house attached to the farm and dwelling, contributing to comfort & convenience -and in the score of- health, it is believed to be inferior to no river situation in this section of the country. The subscribers are authorized to sell the whole or any portion of the estate they may deem expedient to suit purchasers. It is desirable to raise from the sale from 6 to $8000 in cash ; upon the balance of the purchase money, being interest, a liberal credit may be had. Letters addressed to the subscribers, Mattox Bridge, Westmoreland county, will receive immediate attention.
Daniel Carmichael, Geo. W. Smith.
Westmoreland county, Sept. 28, 1822.

The Virginia Herald
October 23, 1822 3:5
For sale, The farm on which the subscriber at present resides, four miles from Fredericksburg, and containing 500 acres, about 300 of which is valuable wood land of the original growth; the cleared land well enclosed, and in good order for cultivation. There are about 20 acres in timothy and other grass; a dwelling house 42 feet long, two stories high, in good repair; and all other out houses necessary for comfort and convenience, in good order; prime orchards of choice fruit, and a well of excellent water at the door; yard and garden well enclosed. Persons wishing to purchase a farm near Fredericksburg, may never have it again in their power to secure one possessing the advantages of the one now offered, on as easy terms. The wood on this land, independent of any other consideration, ought to make it desirable.
William Jackson, Jr.
Poplar Hill, Oct. 23, 1822.

The Virginia Herald
November 6, 1822 4:1
Cherry Grove for sale.
I wish to sell the farm on which I now reside, in the county of Stafford, about 32 miles from Falmouth, & 4 from Fredericksburg, known by the name of Cherry Grove, containing about 270 acres of land, a part of which is well timbered. On this farm is an excellent dwelling house, containing 8 rooms and a large passage; also, all necessary out houses and an excellent ice house. This farm is known to be one of the healthiest situations in the country, and is desirable as a summer retreat, as there is an abundance of fruit trees on it, and a spring of as good water as any in the country. It is presumed, persons wishing to purchase will view it first, when the terms, which will be very accommodating, will be made known.
Edward Withers.
Cherry Grove, Sept. 28, 1822.

The Virginia Herald
November 9, 1822 3:5
Valuable real and personal estate for sale in the county of Culpeper.
Under the powers vested in me by the will of Doctor Horace Buckner, I shall on the first day of January next, on the premises, offer for sale, the whole of the real and personal estate of the deceased, consisting of land, slaves, stock, and crops made during the present year. The land consists of 1263 acres. It lies 4 miles east of the court-house, and has always been considered as one of the most valuable, productive, and improvable farms in the county. It has on it every house necessary for the comfort and convenience of a family. More than half of it is cleared and under good enclosure. There is on it an extensive and valuable meadow in excellent order, from which large crops of hay, upwards of 100 tons, are annually cut. This farm is well adapted for grazing or raising grain. It is in a thickly settled neighborhood, and convenient to several merchant mills, where a ready price is always given for wheat. There is seeded on the land a large crop of wheat which at present looks very promising *Personal estate for sale. Few farms offer such advantages as this to capitalists. It will be shown by those who wish to view it by Mr. Shut, the overseer. The terms will be accommodating and made known the day of sale.
George Buckner, Adm'r of Horace Buckner, dec'd.
Nov. 9, 1822.

The Virginia Herald
November 27, 1822 3:5
The subscriber has three small farms in this county, which he wishes to rent for the ensuing year, or lease for a term of years to good tenants. One of the plantations adjoins the one on which he now resides, and contains 280 acres, with good houses and orchards. One other near Samuel Alsop's Tavern, containing 127 acres, with good houses and orchards for a small family; and the other of 132 1/2 acres, adjoining the land of Mr. Andrew Mitchell, and others, about 8 miles above the court-house. Any person wishing to rent either of the above farms, can have possession at Christmas or sooner if required. I also wish to get tenants for my houses in Fredericksburg, one of which is a comfortable bake house, with two ovens; and other good rooms suitable for a family, good garden, &c. The other is on the Street, which will make a good stand for a grocery. These houses are in good order. For terms of the property in Fredericksburg, apply to Mr. John Metcalf or myself.
Burwell Leavell.
Spotsylvania County, Nov. 27, 1822.

The Virginia Herald
January 25, 1823 3:5
Orange hotel for sale.
The subscriber wishes to sell this very valuable establishment, situated at Orange Court House, on the Turnpike Road leading from Fredericksburg to Swift Run Gap. Its location for public entertainment is perhaps equal to that of any other tavern in Virginia, being directly at the intersection of several very public roads leading from north, south, east, and west. The society of the neighborhood is opulent, and accomplished. The buildings are spacious and in good repair. The stables are very superior, the principal one being of brick, and containing 72 stalls. The others situated to contain 120 horses. Any person wishing to purchase can obtain a great bargain, and possession at any time. Bond will be taken for nearly the amount.
N.B. -This establishment has been rented for $1200 per year; since which, considerable improvement has been made.
Paul Verdier Orange Court-house, Va. Jan. 25, 1823.

The Virginia Herald
February 1, 1823 3:5
Potomac lands for sale.
By virtue of a deed bearing date the 20th day of September, 1822, executed by Robert S. Hipkins, the subscribers are authorized, for the purposes in the said deed expressed, to sell by private bargain or public auction, that valuable and highly improved estate called Bleak Hall, lying on the Potomac river and Mattox creek, in the county of Westmoreland, containing about 1000 acres; 800 of which are river and creek low grounds, in arable condition, and the remainder well covered with oak, cedar and pine. The improvements on the estate consist of a large and commodious two story brick dwelling house, with four good rooms and a passage on a floor, in excellent repair; a mill of considerable value and great convenience to the estate, and every out house attached to the farm and dwelling, contributing to comfort and convenience- and on the score of health, it is believed to be inferior to no river situation in this section of the country. The subscribers are authorized to sell the whole or any portion of this estate they may deem expedient to suit purchasers. It is desirable to raise by the sale, from 6 to $8000 in cash: upon the balance of the purchase money, bearing interest, a liberal credit may be had. Propositions for private sale will be received until Friday the 21st of next month, when, if not sold, it will be offered at public auction, at the store house of P. G. Triplett, within a short distance of the premises. Letters addressed to the subscribers, Mattox Bridge, Westmoreland county, will receive immediate attention.
Dan'l Carmichael, Geo. W. Smith Westmoreland county, Jan. 28, 1823.

The above is with my entire appropriation and at my own instance. I at present reside on the estate, and it will afford me pleasure to view the farm with any gentleman disposed to purchase, and those so inclined are earnestly invited to visit it.
Robert S. Hipkins.

The Virginia Herald
March 12, 1823 3:5
Now offering a great bargain!! My corner lot in Fredericksburg, bounded on three sides by Sophia Street, Lewis-St, and the river, & next adjoining Christie's Wharf, being one third of the square, and designated in a plat of said square by Lot. No. l. There is a large factory house on the premises, formerly occupied as a soap and candle manufactory, and might be converted into a warehouse from which grain or other produce can be delivered on board scows free of the expense of drayage. Also, one other lot adjoining, on which there is a comfortable dwelling house, and kitchen, with a bath house newly erected, and a spring equal to any in this part of the country, with excellent gardens attached. These two lots I will exchange for western lands, likely young Negroes, or dispose for ready money or negotiable notes, very cheap, as I am about to leave the state on or about the first of April ensuing. Application to be made to John L. Marye, esq living in Fredericksburg, or to the subscriber at his father's, about four miles from town, who will sell the remaining one third of the square to any person wishing to own the whole.
Horatio N. Spooner.
March 12, 1823.

The Virginia Herald
April 12, 1823 1:2
Valuable property for sale.
The subscriber, being anxious to remove to the south-west, offers for sale the following property, viz: One tract of land containing 618 acres, within three miles of Culpeper court house, and lying between the lands of Capt. W. C. Windslow and Captain Samuel Rixey. The improvements consist of a small dwelling house and the necessary out house, barn, stable, &c. This tract of land has always been esteemed as one of the most valuable in the neighborhood. Western View contains 603 acres, lies on Mountain Run, adjoninig the lands of Robert Patton, esq and Col. George Thom. The improvements of every description here are very valuable, in good repair and amply sufficient for the accommodation of a large family. The farm is in good order, and the soil has been much improved within a few years past. It deservedly ranks among the best farms in the neighborhood. Also, a handsome house and 2 half-acre lots in the town of Stevensburg, and an undivided interest (about 225 acres) in that large and valuable estate called Roxbury, lying about 10 miles south of Fredericksburg, between two branches of the Mattapony river. The above property is offered on accommodating terms.
Samuel Slaughter.
Western View, Culpeper county, March 29, 1823.

The Virginia Herald
April 12, 1823 3:4
Bunker's-Hill for sale.
This desirable seat (situated half way between Fredericksburg and Falmouth) contains about 7 acres of very rich land, with every convenience for the accommodation of a genteel family, the dwelling house is in good repair: the outbuildings and enclosure are all new; the garden large and productive. To a gentleman wishing to educate a young family, this residence would be peculiarly eligible from its contiguity to Fredericksburg, in which place are several first rate Seminaries. The lot being too large for its present occupant, would be disposed of on very accommodating terms, or exchanged for property in Fredericksburg. Application by letter or other wise, to W. A. Knox, Esq Fredericksburg, or to the subscriber on the premises.
A.R.B. Storke April 12, 1823.

The Virginia Herald
April 12, 1823 3:4
Mill property for sale.
Under a deed in trust from Robert Mackay to the subscriber. That property known by the name of The New Mills, situated in the county of Culpeper, on the north branch of the Rappahannock river, consisting of a good frame mill house, 46 feet by 56 feet, with three pair of burr stones, one pair rubbers, and Evan's machinery complete. -A separate mill house and mill for grinding plaster and grist. Also, about 240 acres of land attached, on which is a supply of wood. -a comfortable framed house for the miller, cooper's-shops, a blacksmith's shop, &c. The dam is substantial, having the main road from the upper country to Falmouth and Fredericksburg passing over it. The situation of this property is very favorable in commanding a full supply of grain either by purchasing or to grind on the usual terms, there being no mill in the neighborhood that can interfere materially. If not previously disposed of at private bargain, it will be set up to the highest bidder, on Tuesday the 26th of next month. Any person wishing to see the property, can do so by application to Mr. Calhoun, the miller now there; and for the terms to Robert Mackay or John Scott in this place. The Central Mills in the county of orange. One moiety of this property, (held in conjunction with Mr. George W. Spotswood,) is also offered for sale; consisting of a manufacturing, grist and saw mills. They are in the centre of a fine grain country and well known, so a further description is deemed unnecessary. If not sold privately this will be offered to the highest bidder at Orange court house, on Monday the 26th day of next month. Apply for terms as above.
John Gray.
Fred'g. April 12, 1823.

The Virginia Herald
April 16, 1823 3:5
Pamonkey Mills for sale.
This valuable mill property is situated in Orange county, 35 miles from Fredericksburg, 70 from Richmond and 9 from Orange Court-house; its vicinity to good markets is not more inviting than the abundance of wheat in the neighborhood is propitious of uncommon success in lucrative advantage. The property consists of a merchant mill running two pair of 5 feet burr stones, and a pair of rubbers, with every necessary machinery, all in complete repair, which enables the mill to make from 40 to 50 barrels of flour a day. A new grist mill, executed by the hard of one of the most substantial workmen in the state, to which is annexed a geared saw mill, which is capable of sawing from 12 to 1500 feet of plank per day. The water which turns the mills is received from two dams sufficiently large to drive all the machinery of the different mills at the same time. There are 50 acres of first rate land attached to the mill, on which stands a dwelling house, 60 feet long by 20 broad, with four rooms below and two above stairs. The conveniences besides those already mentioned, are a kitchen composed of framed timber, a spinning and weaving house, entirely convenient to the dwelling house; a smoke house, a blacksmith's and cooper's shop, and a corn house and stables, with a productive and highly improved garden. I presume that the above mentioned property needs no further panegyric, as those who are disposed to purchase, will call and examine for themselves. Should a purchaser be met with, the terms will be accommodating, and possession will be given at the commencement of next grinding season.
John Fisher.
April 16, 1823.

The Virginia Herald
May 7, 1823 3:5
Valuable property for sale.
Under two deeds of trust from Thomas Goodwin to the subscriber, for the purposes therein mentioned, I shall offer for sale, to the highest bidder, before Buck's Auction Room, in the town of Fredericksburg, on the 19th day of June next, on accommodating terms, then to be made known, the following property: One moiety of Glassell's Wharf and warehouse- the stores and dwelling house on Caroline street, occupied by T. Goodwin and Messrs. Middletons, 50 feet front, with a five foot alley, running back to Water street, with every necessary out house, all in good repair; the dwelling house is large, having 8 well finished rooms above stairs, with a fire place in each- the stand is equal to any in town for any sort of mercantile business or tavern, being at the intersection of Caroline and Commerce streets, leading to the New Bridge. The large stone warehouse back of the above, on Water street, well calculated to receive grain and flour, having three floors. This property is fire proof, and is well worth the attention of a capitalist- also, the brick warehouse and stable, on the same lot, with the last mentioned warehouse. The white house and lot on Commerce or William street, opposite Mr. Peck's New Building, with the necessary out houses, all as good as new, having been lately thoroughly repair -the lot is 72 feet front, running back 165 feet, and may be divided to suit Purchasers. Two squares of lots on the New turnpike Road, adjoining town, handsomely situated for private dwelling or places of business; they may be divided so as to suit purchasers. -One other lot about 72 feet front at the west corner next to above, running back to Mr. Gordon's land- one other lot at the corner, adjoining Mr. Peter Hord's property, 40 feet front and 120 feet deep.
A farm on Massaponax Run, containing 373 1/2 acres. This farm is in good order, well adapted to the growth of grass, small grain and Indian corn; it has plenty of wood and rail timber; the dwelling house thereon has a passage and three rooms below stairs, and two above; a overseer's house and every necessary out house wanted on a farm, all in good order and nearly new. Possession of this property will be given on the 10th day of December next, with the privilege of seeding this fall. Mr. Abbott, the overseer, will shew the premises to any person inclined to purchase.
Wm. L. Roberts. trustee.
Fred'g. May 7, 1823.

The Virginia Herald
May 14, 1823 3:4
Woodland for sale or exchange.
I will sell or exchange my farm situated two miles from Fredericksburg, on the Turnpike, the former residence of the late William Storke. It contains about 700 acres of land, superabundantly timbered, well watered, and naturally of good soil; plaster of Paris acts with great effect. The buildings are of wood, in an improved state, are very extensive and comfortable. The situation is admitted by all who know it as healthy and desirable. I will take in exchange a farm of lesser value, in part; or dispose of it on very accommodating terms otherwise. As to the payments, I will make them easy and lengthy. I would prefer a farm in exchange on the Potomac. Any person communicating with me on this subject, paying postage, shall be attended to.
Henry O. Middleton.
Fred'g May 14, 1823.

The Virginia Herald
May 31, 1823 3:5
Notice.
I wish to sell my farm, lying in the county of Spotsylvania, on the Rappahannock river, two miles above the town of Fredericksburg, containing 490 acres. -70 of which is river bottom of superior quality, and very productive; 300 of arable high land of good quality and in good order; 120 of prime wood land, that will cut 40 cords of wood to the acre, which will bring $2 per cord on the land, or if carried to town, $4 -The improvements are a small dwelling house, neatly finished, with all necessary farm and out-houses; a good garden and a young apple orchard, of select fruit; fine springs of pure water- the situation as healthy as any in the state. The falls on the river, around this land, affords beautiful mill seats. This land being situated so near town gives it many advantages both to markets and society, that few tracts now for sale, afford. I will sell a great bargain on this land and give a long credit on the principal part of the purchase money. *Personal property for sale This land can be seen and terms known by application to the subscriber, living at the Island Mills, about one mile from Fredericksburg.
Thomas Poindexter, Jr.
May 31, 1823.


The Virginia Herald
June 4, 1823 3:4
Forest Hill.
The subscriber offers for sale the tract of land, whereon at present he resides, situated on a branch of the Mattapony, called Lewis's River, in the county of Spotsylvania, adjoining the lands of Samuel Alsop, Lewis W. Dangerfield, William Richardson, and others, distant about 10 miles from Fredericksburg, and containing 950 acres. One-third of this land is in woods of natural growth, and heavily timbered with pine, oak, and hickory, the scarcity of which in the vicinity of town, together with the ready sale always to be had, renders it an important object. The cleared part is laid off into four shifts of nearly equal size, and is now in an improving state. Plaster and clover (from the small experiments made) set well- and no tract of its size is as well watered. The improvements are, a large dwelling house, with three commodious rooms on the lower floor, and the same number of equal size on the upper, with fire places and convenient closets in each- also, a spacious passage through the centre of the house. A good kitchen, dairy, meat house, ice house, barn, corn house, stable, overseer's house and negro cabins. -An apple orchard containing 4 or 500 bearing trees of the best selected fruit, in a very thriving state, yielding annually from 4 to 5000 gallons of cider. The stage road leading from Fredericksburg to Spotsylvania court-house, divides this land into two parts, nearly equal, either of which will be disposed of separately if necessary. Persons wishing to purchase land in this part of the country, would do well to view the premises, as a great bargain may be had. -Bonds or bank stock taken in payment, or a long credit suited to the convenience of the purchaser will be given. In the absence of the subscriber, Mr. Burwell Leavell, who lives near the land, will show it to any persons wishing to purchase, or information may be had of Mr. Laurence Slaughter, residing in Fredericksburg.
Wm. G. Sears.
N.B. If the above land is not sold at private sale before Friday the 8th of August next, it will on that day be publically offered for sale at the tavern of Mr. Samuel Alsop. W.G.S.
June 4, 1823.

The Virginia Herald
June 25, 1823 3:5
For rent, The brick house, at present occupied by Mrs. Gray as a millinery store, a few doors above the Virginia Bank, and next to Mr. Cady's. All the necessary out houses, together with the warehouse, are in good order. The garden is sufficiently large for a small family. For terms apply to the subscriber. Possession will be given the 1st of July next.
William James.
(Fredericksburg) June 25, 1823.

The Virginia Herald
July 2, 1823 3:4
For sale or exchange.
The following property is offered for sale on a long credit or barter, for almost any kind of personal property, on terms highly advantageous to the purchaser -namely: A tract of land containing 358 acres, in the county of Fairfax, Virginia, 13 miles above Georgetown, just above the Great Falls of Potomac, lying between the river and the Little Falls Turnpike Road, leading to Leesburg, not more than a mile distant from the former and little more from the latter. The soil of this land is good and very productive -about one half of it has been in cultivation, the balance remains well set in wood and timber, mostly oak and hickory, and is within sight of a large establishment called the Woollington Distillery, erected and owned by the late Samuel G. Griffith of Baltimore, which affords a constant market for a large quantity of grain, as it will also before long for the spare wood of the neighboring country. To this may be added, the advantage justly expected from the Potomac Canal, now in contemplation, which promises with certainty to enhance very largely the value of the property bordering on it, as well of that of the District generally. Also, a house and lot in the central part of Georgetown, very near the Farmer's and Mechanic's Bank. The lot fronts 50 feet on Congress street, and extends back 123. The house is large, though perhaps at this time is out of repair; but has attached to it the necessary out houses, and with a little expense can be made a comfortable dwelling. To this property an unquestionable title will be given. Apply to the subscriber in Fredericksburg. William Grayson.

The Virginia Herald
July 12, 1823 3:5
Wishing to remove in the fall to Kentucky, I offer for sale the following property: My plantation, near 300 acres, on the Turnpike road, 5 miles above Fredericksburg; it is well wooded and watered; it may be considered a truly desirable retreat to any gentleman of fortune on the rivers, where the summer and autumn fevers prevail. I can with truth say, that my family have resided at this place for 9 years without complaint. -In the selection of this spot, I have not been disappointed as to relates to the salubrity of air, &c. The land is mostly fresh and lies (generally) level; and there is a great portion of meadow land on it- on the whole it would be a very valuable acquisition to a managing man. The situation of the dwelling house is high and beautiful, commanding a view of the whole farm nearly; and not surpassed by any other, on the extended Turnpike road from Fredericksburg to Orange or Culpeper counties. The stock, plantation utensils, &c. can be had with the land -Also for sale, 15 acres of choice meadow land, just below the town of Fredericksburg, at the mouth of Hazel Run. Any person inclined to purchase in either case, apply to John Mortimer.
Spotsylvania county, July 12, 1823.

The Virginia Herald
September 6, 1823 3:5
Mill & Farm for sale.
The mill and farm on which the subscriber now resides, 10 miles from Fredericksburg, on the main road to Richmond, in Spotsylvania county, consisting of a large merchant and grist mill, both under the same roof. The mill house is 40 feet square, with 5 floors; all built of the best materials about 6 years ago; with two water wheels, one pair of excellent burr stones, 5 1/2 feet in diameter, and one pair of Cologne stones, 4 1/2 feet in diameter, with all of Evan's improvements, such as elevators for wheat and flour, hopper boy, &c. A small dwelling house, kitchen, and other necessary out houses, with a store house on the main road, and 171 acres of good land, laid off in three lots, all lying on the river Ny and adjoining the mill. Likewise, 270 acres of land, lying in the same county, about 10 miles above the courthouse, and formerly belonging to Mr. John Crooks, on which has formerly been a grist mill, but not in repair at this time. If this property has not sold at private sale before the first day of October next, it will be sold at public sale on that day, at the mill as above. The terms will be accommodating, and will be made known on the day of sale, or on application to Mr. John Scott, Merchant, Fredericksburg, or to the subscriber residing on the premises.
Robert Swan.
September 6.

The Virginia Herald
September 17, 1823 3:5
Mill farm for sale.
This tract of land lies in the county of Spotsylvania, on a branch of the Mattapony river, and about 12 or 13 miles from Fredericksburg; contains upwards of 500 acres, a considerable portion of which is flat land, that produces tobacco and timothy. Few tracts of land are better watered than this, and there is an abundance of good timber on it. There is also a corn mill, newly repaired on a stream that seldom fails, in a good neighborhood for grist- an overseer's house with 2 rooms and a stone chimney; a new barn, stables, &c. the whole under good fence. Persons wishing to purchase are requested to call on Mr. Heslop, the overseer who will show them the land. It will be sold at private should a purchaser offer; if not, it will be sold at public auction on the premises, on Friday, the 5th day of December next, upon terms then to be made known. *Personal estate for sale Dabney Herndon, Wm. Jackson, Jr.
Ex'ors of Peter Smock, deceased.
Fred'g Sept. 17, 1823.

The Virginia Herald
September 24, 1823 3:5
Valuable plantation for sale.
On the 25th instant, I shall sell at Buck's Auction Room, my plantation called Berclair, in Spotsylvania county, 4 miles from Fredericksburg, containing about 300 acres. The mansion house has been built 6 or 7 years, is two stories high, with 6 rooms and a spacious passage 12 feet wide, with closets and every conveniency calculated to promote the comfort of a family. There is a good kitchen, a smoke house, a dairy, an office 12 by 16 feet, with a good brick chimney, a spinning and weaving house, with two rooms below and one above stairs, an overseer's house, with two rooms; and in the yard, a well of excellent water and a good ice house. The garden is extensive, is well enclosed and contains a variety of fruits and shrubs. There is a new cow-house, a barn 40 by 20 feet, and two stables. Also a piece of land containing about 200 acres within three-fourths of a mile of the above named tract. Also another valuable piece or parcel of land, lying on Massaponax, adjoining the lands of Messrs. Goodwin, Morton, and Alsop. It is well wooded and has a stable with two Negro quarters. The quantity of land will be ascertained before the day of sale . It is presumed that no person will purchase without viewing the premises, and therefore a further description of the lands is thought unnecessary. Terms will be made known on the day of sale.
George French.
Fred'g, Sept. 10.

The Virginia Herald
September 27, 1823 3:4
Woodland for sale.
Being determined to continue my attention exclusively to my business in town, I will offer for sale on the 8th day of October, if fair, if not the next fair day, at James Young's Tavern in Fredericksburg. It is situated 2 miles from Fredericksburg, Va. on the turnpike, the former residence of William Storke. It contains between 7 and 800 acres of land, 200 of which is well and heavily timbered with oak and hickory, and 150 more of small young growth, from which has been cut the original large growth. This land is well watered generally; the springs may be equalled, but not surpassed for purity in the U. States, with a pump of excellent mineral water in the yard, and a spring of spa water a short distance from the house- there is also a good orchard. The soil of this land is naturally good, and the greater portion of the arable land is in a tolerably improved state for cultivation- plaster Paris acts with great effect- clover grows kindly. The buildings are of wood in the very best state of improvement -are very extensive and comfortable- consisting of a dwelling house, fashionably constructed, with 5 rooms below stairs, painted and papered, and two on the second floor, with an excellent dry cellar; a neat and well finished kitchen, an office, dairy and meat house, in uniformity and neatly completed, carriage house, a large shedded frame corn house and granary, with stalls for 10 horses, well constructed & finished; an overseer's house, a tobacco house 52 feet by 20, nearly completed, with 11 comfortable out houses for servants; the garden and yard are handsomely laid off, and well supplied with fruit trees and shrubbery, and substantially paled in with the best materials. The situation is admitted by all who know it as very healthy and desirable; an ample quantity of rich low ground is prepared to receive timothy for the consumption of the place, and more can easily be prepared in the course of dividing and cultivating the farm *Farm supplies for sale A part of this land is now in clover, sowed last spring; a considerable clover fallow has already been prepared for wheat. There is sufficient field prepared, including some corn land, to receive 100 bushels of seed wheat. I would prefer private sale. The terms are one third cash in hand; the balance in 6, 12, and 18 months. I will take bank stock in exchange.
Henry 0. Middleton, residing in Fred'g, Va.
Sept. 27, 1823.

The Virginia Herald
November 19, 1823 3:3
Potomac land at auction.
The subscriber will sell, at public auction, to the highest bidder, on Tuesday, the 23d day of December next, at Stafford Courthouse, a very valuable tract of land, situated within 3/4 of a mile of the Potomac river. It contains about 500 acres, the larger portion of which is remarkably well covered with timber and firewood, which renders it valuable by its contiguity to the markets of the District of Columbia. The arable portion of this farm is not exceeded by any on the Potomac river for the production of all the staple articles of the country. It is distant from Alexandria 36 miles; from Fredericksburg 18; and from Dumfries 9 miles. There is adjoining to this land a large and valuable manufacturing mill, where the highest prices have been given for grain. It is remarkably well watered, and has about 20 acres of as valuable meadow land as any in the state of Virginia, which can be, with but little labour, put in grass, having recently grown up in under wood. The only building is a large and well finished barn, shaded on three sides, in good order. The terms of sale will be one third of the purchase money in cash; a credit of one and two years will be given for the balance. The purchaser will be required to give bonds with sufficient security, to carry interest from the date, and a deed of trust upon the land, to secure the payment. Persons disposed to view the land will call on Geo. M. Cooke, near Aquia, Va. who will give any information relating to it.
John Cooke, Geo. M. Cooke.
Near Aquia, Va. Nov 19, 1823.

The Virginia Herald
November 22, 1823 3:5
For sale.
I will sell the greatest bargain in a large and commodious house and two lots of land in the town of Port Royal, perhaps ever offered in any part of the country. There are three large well finished rooms and a small one below stairs, and a passage, and two above, with convenient closets- the larger room below being but one story, and heretofore used as either a drawing or ball room, with a brick building annexed, which, with little repair, would make an excellent store house. Perhaps at this time no place in the state offers more advantages to any gentleman wishing to engage in the mercantile business, more particularly one who would purchase grain, in a wealthy country, where any quantity can always be had at certain profit. There are good dry cellars throughout the building, an excellent garden enclosed, and large stables annexed, which would do well for a tavern, or might be converted into granaries. Possession will be given on the first of January next, until which time the property is rented as a tavern. I will take good bonds on long credit bearing interest, or Negroes at valuation, in payment.
Philip Lightfoot.
November 22.

The Virginia Herald
December 3, 1823 3:3
Positive sales of valuable property.
A valuable grist mill, in the town of Falmouth, will be offered at public auction to the highest bidder, upon the premises, on Tuesday the 30th of December next, This mill is upon a canal connected to the falls of the Rappahannock river, has an abundant and constant supply of water for an overshot wheel -contiguous to the mill there is a new two story stone miller's house. This is one of the most valuable grist mills on the river; it rented for $500 the past year ending on the 1st instant. With a little addition to the mill house, it might also be a manufacturing mill, and consequently much more productive. At Buck's Auction Room, in Fredericksburg, on Monday the 29th of December next, will be offered for sale, to the highest bidder, a valuable unimproved lot of land, 100 by 132 feet, opposite the court house lot, and adjoining Dr. James Carmichael's lot, two lots and two wharves, on the river, just above the landing of the lower ferry, which have produced $600 annually. Terms, 1/3 of the purchase money; the balance payable in 1, 2, and 3 equal annual payments, with interest thereon, and deeds of trust on the property to secure payments.
Daniel Grinnan.
Fred'g Nov. 29, 1823.

The Virginia Herald
December 10, 1823 3:4
By virtue of a decree of the county court of Orange, bearing date the 28th day of July, 1823, will be sold to the highest bidder, on the premises on Saturday, the 20th day of this month, if fair, if not fair the next day (Sundays excepted) on a credit of one and two years, the tract of land, belonging to the estate of David Faulconer, deceased, lying within about 22 or 3 miles of Fredericksburg, and containing by estimation 357 acres, whereon there is a tolerably comfortable dwelling house for a small family, an orchard of apple and peach trees, which seldom fail to bear, and several good springs. This land lies in a high and healthy section of the country, bears grain kindly, and is susceptible of considerable improvement. Bonds with approved security will be required of the purchaser, and a small sum in ready money to defray expenses, by Thomas Row, Geo. Grasty, Comm'rs.
Dec. 10, 1823.

The Virginia Herald
January 7, 1824 3:4
Oakley- for sale.
The subscriber is anxious to sell his farm, lying on Mountain Run, in the county of orange, containing about 749 acres, adjoining the lands of Catlett Conway, sen'r, Capt. Hume and Mr. Robert W. Shepherd, within one mile of the Turnpike road; 8 miles from Orange court-house, and 30 from Fredericksburg. As it is presumed no person would purchase without viewing the premises, it will be unnecessary to enter into minute detail of the many advantages it possesses: I will therefore only say that the buildings are comfortable- the dwelling house two stories high, with two rooms and a passage below, and three above. There is also a small grist mill that might be made profitable with a little repair. The land lies well- has a large proportion of low grounds and the greater part well taken with clover- an abundance of wood and water, having several fine streams passing through it, with good springs; and from the trials I have made with plaster, no land can be more rapidly improved by its use. The terms will be made accommodating to any person disposed to purchase and a extensive credit will be given upon a great part of the money, it being satisfactorily secured, the interest paid annually. Any person disposed to purchase can view the farm on application to the subscriber, and the terms will be made known.
Francis Conway.
Orange, Jan. 7, 1824.

The Virginia Herald
April 10, 1824 1:2
Public sale.
The subscriber will offer for sale at auction, in the town of Fredericksburg, on Wednesday the 21st of April next, the country seat at the north end of town, well known by the name of "White Plains" and lately owned by Robert Patton, esq. A credit of four months will be allowed the purchaser, for which a negotiable note with a suitable endorser will be required; and such a title as is vested in the trustees of the said Patton will be made on the payment of the purchase money. The property consists of a very extensive and well finished dwelling, with commodious and suitable out houses of every description; a handsome garden, ornamental shrubbery, &c; to which is attached about 20 acres of valuable and highly productive land. No place perhaps within the vicinity of Fredericksburg is better calculated to afford comfort and retirement to a private family than this, comprising as it does, the advantages of both town and country, and in reach of an extensive and agreeable society. Persons wishing to purchase the property will in my absence call on Dr. Wm. Grayson of Fredericksburg who is fully authorized to make sale of it previous to the date above mentioned.
Philip Thornton.
Fred'g. March 26, 1824.

The Virginia Herald
April 24, 1824 3:4
For sale, by auction, On the 17th day of June next, that valuable estate, Mildenhall, situated on the north side of the Rappahannock river, in Richmond county in Virginia, containing near 600 acres, about 40 miles from the mouth, and about 15 miles below Tappahannock, the Port of Entry. It commands a view of the river upwards of 30 miles, and its south river boundary abounds with choice fish, viz: sheepshead, drum, trout, rock, perch, &c &c. besides large banks of choice oysters, extending one mile with a fine sandy beach, for seine hauling. Water fowl in abundance in their season. This estate is now in a high state of improvement, enclosed with chestnut posts and rails, with good gates. The improvements are a comfortable dwelling house, containing 4 lodging and one large dining room, a good barn, stable and kitchen, with a draw well of excellent water, close by the kitchen, and a fine spring of pure water, about 200 yards from the dwelling. Also, extensive apple and peach orchards, with other choice fruits, and a productive garden. The soil is adapted to wheat, corn, rye, barley, and oats- of which large crops have been raised, as well as cotton. -Also an abundance of wood for plantation use. The finest stock of sheep in the U. States was raised on this farm, of Cape breed. This land is an entire level, except where two branches of the river, or rather two small creeks, which bound N.W. and S.E. which receives any redundancy of water which may fall on the plantation. From its situation, even surface, and strong bottom, much more might be said which is deemed unnecessary. This property will be offered at public sale, on the premises, on Thursday the 17th day of June next. Further information may be obtained on reference to Austin Neale, esq at Shandy Hall's, 3 miles up the river, or to John Nicholson, Baltimore, Administrator of the late Wm. Peachey.
N. B. This has always been considered as one of the healthiest situations on the river; also a constant water communication to Baltimore, City of Washington, Alexandria, Fredericksburg, and Norfolk. April 24, 1824.

The Virginia Herald
May 12, 1824 3:5
Having determined to remove to my land on the Kenawha river, in Mason county, I offer for sale the 6 following tracts of land:- Springfield, whereon I now live, containing 1315 acres, on the waters of Cedar run and Crooked run, in Culpeper County, 8 miles from the courthouse, and 12 miles from Orange courthouse, 45 miles above Fredericksburg. The dwelling house is 86 feet long, including the two wings; 32 feet wide, seven rooms on the lower floor, all with fire places; two large passage ways and two closets, six rooms above stairs with four fire places, a large passage and a large entry, three rooms in the cellar with one fire place- a new kitchen with two rooms and a stone chimney- meat-house- ice-house- spring-house, carriage-house, overseer's house, with two rooms, a stone chimney, kitchen and meat-house; the yard and garden well enclosed; the yard handsomely set with trees, locust, wild crab, poplar, willow, cedar, &c; affording a most beautiful shade all around the house in the summer- a very extensive meadow of 40 acres running in a half circle around the house & at the bottom of the yard, where is a handsome creek of never failing water which runs thro' the tract of land; there is also another creek, and at least 20 good springs upon this tract of land, 4 valuable springs very near the dwelling house- a stable 72 feet long, 24 wide, two stories high, with 30 stalls, for horses and milch cows, shedded all around- a corn house, 42 by 12, with a passage in the middle- a new barn, 46 by 52 feet on the lower floor, with a valuable wheat machine in it; several quarters for Negroes, with plank floors and stone chimneys- about 800 acres of land cleared and laid out in six fields; two meadows and several lots, all of which have constant water running through them; the remainder of the land heavily timbered, with white and red oak, poplar, ash, hickory, locust, &c &c. 350 acres adjoining the above tract, on which is a very valuable grist mill, with two pair of stones; a bolting cloth and plaster machine, and a first rate saw mill, all in excellent repair- a new house, 44 by 18, two stories high, is lately framed, and will be raised in a few days. This is one among the most beautiful situations in the upper country- well watered and well timbered. 400 acres adjoining the last tract, on which is a comfortable dwelling house, with three rooms on the lower floor; a kitchen with two rooms and a stone chimney, with two fire places. -This land is uncommonly well watered, and has a large proportion of first rate timber, and upwards of 100 acres of prime meadow land, two creeks running through it; two first rate springs very near the kitchen. 150 acres adjoining Springfield, about one half cleared, the balance heavily timbered. These four tracts have been cultivated in separate tracts. Springfield might be divided advantageously, and then five families might settle adjoining each other. *Land in Ohio and Kentucky Terms, one third in hand, and two equal annual payments for the balance; bonds well secured, or likely young Negroes, will be received for the two last payments, particularly all bonds to which I am security.
Phil. Slaughter May 12, 1824.

The Virginia Herald
May 19, 1824 3:5
Snow Hill for sale. Recent domestic occurrences will induce me to sell this highly valuable and beautiful estate situated in the upper part of Prince William county, Virginia, near the line of Loudoun county, and 3 miles from the Bull Run Mountains, 30 miles from Washington City, and Alexandria, over a good turnpike, containing 879 acres of fine corn land, producing a spontaneous growth of poplar and locust, is divided into five fields of 120 to 140 acres each, has 200 bushels of fine wheat well put in , (on a field that produced 2300 bushels four years ago) 50 bushels of rye, 70 acres in clover, 60 acres in oats, and 30 acres for tobacco, of a soil well adapted, from an experiment of this year, to the growth of high priced tobacco. Any portion of the crop of corn of 500 or 600 barrels, may be had with it, if required- about 200 acres in wood and rail timber. The improvements consist of a two story dwelling house, in good order, with four rooms and a spacious passage on each floor, with two Grecian porches, finished in a very superior style, and a stone kitchen and cook house, and all other out houses necessary for such an estate; a good garden and orchard of choice fruit- A small portion only of the purchase money will be required in hand, and the balance in four installments, in such portions as shall be stipulated- For health, beauty of situation, and agreeable society, it stands unrivalled in any part of the country. A good bargain will be given if early arrangement can be made. Possession will be given at any time, but if it would suit the convenience of the purchaser, it will be advantageously cultivated this year on shares and any portion of the labor, &c. furnished, or $1000 may be had for the use of the land alone.
Wm. Hebb.
Near Hay Market. May 19.
N.B. Land on the Potomac will be taken in part.

The Virginia Herald
June 9, 1824 3:5
The subscriber offers for sale that valuable tract of land, called Hilton, lying on Chotank Creek, in King George county, Va., and within half a mile of the Potomac Academy, and in one of the most genteel and respected neighborhoods in the lower country. This estate contains about 740 acres of fine Potomac land, upwards of one half cleared and enclosed, and capable, I am informed, of producing annually, from 7 to 800 barrels of corn, and from 800 to 1000 bushels of wheat. The balance of the land is covered with all varieties of the neighborhood growth, and although no very heavy timber, yet an abundance of locust, cedar, &c for enclosures. There is on it a good dwelling house, barn, overseer's and other houses, and taken altogether, it is considered among the most desirable farms to be met with in the market- Mr. B. Grymes, in whose possession the farm is at present, would shew it to those desirous of purchasing, and the terms may be known by applying to Younger Johnson, Esq near King George C. H. or to the subscriber.
Geo. Johnson.
Alexandria, (D.C.) June 9, 1824.

The Virginia Herald
June 12, 1824 3:5
Potomac land for sale. By virtue of the last will and testament of William H. Nicoll, deceased, late of the county of Northumberland and state of Virginia, I will, at the courthouse of the county aforesaid, on Monday the 9th day of August next, it being court day, offer for sale to the highest bidder, that valuable farm called Cupid's, situated on Cupid's creek, in the county aforesaid and containing by survey 731 acres 3 roods and 10 poles of land, of excellent quality. About two-thirds of this land are cleared, the balance is in wood and heavily timbered. The fences are of durable materials and in good repair. The houses are commodious and suitable as well for the accommodation of a genteel family as for all the purposes of a farm. There is on this land an extensive orchard of the most choice fruits. This farm is nearly equi-distant from Baltimore, Norfolk, and the District of Columbia, with the advantages of an inland market, as it is only 3 miles from the county courthouse, and within 6 miles of the Northumberland Academy, a well conducted and flourishing school. -It is pre-eminent for fish, oysters, and wild fowl. The neighborhood is both healthy and agreeable. A farm so desirable is seldom in market. The subscriber invites persons wishing to purchase to view this valuable property, which will be offered on the most liberal and accommodating credit, the particulars of which will be made known on the day of sale. The subscriber reserves to himself the privilege of one bid.
Samuel Blackwell.

The Virginia Herald
July 24, 1824 3:4
I will sell or rent the well known tavern, in the town of Fredericksburg, called the Indian Queen, otherwise, the Old Indian. -The house is a very large and convenient one, has lately been thoroughly repaired and newly painted, and the lot is in a neat and handsome condition. There is upon the premises a brick stable, inferior to none in the state; it is upwards of 100 feet in length, and so constructed as to be remarked for its convenience, to which is attached a spacious carriage house and granary, both of brick. I will sell or rent with the houses, 40 beds, with the necessary cloathing- together with most of the other furniture, now in the use of the subscriber. The property is too well known to require a further description. Possession can be given in October next. For other terms, apply to the subscriber or to C. L. Stevenson. John Gray, jr.
July 24, 1824.

The Virginia Herald
August 18, 1824 3:5
Valuable property for sale. Having relinquished the idea of changing my place of residence, I now offer for sale the beautiful, healthy, and desirable situation, adjoining the town of Falmouth, with all its appurtenances. The dwelling house is large and commodious, two stories high, four rooms on each floor and well finished. There is every necessary out house, viz: An office, a good kitchen, smoke house, store house, barn, stable, and carriage house, insurance on the same and premises paid for, $4000- A large and productive garden; in the yard stands a pump yielding delightful water, which is conveyed by pipes to water the stock- in the rear of the house and garden, is a romantic grove of large oak trees, in which is the overseer's house- in fact this situation has not its equal in this section of the country for health and beauty- it being situated on the highest eminence of the neighborhood, possessing a commanding view of both towns of Falmouth and Fredericksburg, and a considerable distance down the Rappahannock river. There are 354 acres of land, nearly one half in wood, the rest laid off in three shifts, under a good cedar fence with a stream of water running through each. The land produces well and has never failed in the most difficult seasons. By a little improvement (which from its contiguity to both towns is easily done and at a trifling expense) I have made 25 bushels of wheat to the acre. There is a sufficiency of oak timber and an abundance of pine wood, which is in great demand and lies so convenient to town, that 6 loads per day may be hauled, taking back each time, a load of manure, which may be often gathered about the streets, for the expense of moving it. *Personal estate for sale Those desirous of purchasing this valuable property can view the same, and know the terms by application to A. Walker.
Aug. 18, 1824.
N.B. The house is furnished with neat and plain mahogany furniture which, if desired, will be put at a reduced price.

The Virginia Herald
August 21, 1824 3:5
Valuable farm for sale. We will sell at private sale that tract of land known by the name of Clearview, lying on Chappawamsic creek,in Prince William county, Virginia, and bordering on the main road leading from Alexandria to Fredericksburg, 3 1/2 miles from Dumfries, and 2 1/2 from the Potomac river, containing about 480 acres. It has a full proportion of woodland, abundantly watered, and is adapted to the growth of corn, wheat, and tobacco- a meadow including about 100 acres, the greater part of which is well set with timothy. It has a comfortable dwelling house and all necessary out houses, and is one of the most beautiful situations in that section of the country. The dwelling house commands the view of a large part of the river and creek; the latter is navigable for large boats within a quarter of a mile of the farm. Those inclined to purchase will be shown the farm by Lewis Adie, residing thereon, or by Hugh Adie.
near Stafford Court House.
August 21, 1824.

The Virginia Herald
August 28, 1824 3:4
For sale, a neat small farm, containing 339 1/2 acres, lying 9 miles from Fredericksburg, and 4 miles from the turnpike road. The subscriber, being desirous of uniting and commanding immediately his business, will sell this very desirable little farm, with crop, stock, implements, and utensils, on liberal terms, at private sale,-and so arrange the payments to suit the purchaser, for cash or credit, or in part. The improvements are a comfortable dwelling house, 40 by 20, two rooms below and two above, with two stone chimneys, a new kitchen, smoke house and dairy, two good Negro houses, corn house and a good long barn 80 feet by 20, shedded on one side with a stable in the end, with a good apple orchard- the fencing is good, and a number of spare rails. The land lies well and well proportioned, in open and wood lands conveniently situated- about half the open land is very good, about 20 acres of which is well ditched and well drained and cleared of all ravines, about one fourth improved with clover and plaster; and the balance medium and poor, though easily improved by a judicious attention to the manure heap- the resources for which is very abundant, from 3 to 400 ox cart loads can be made with ordinary care every year. The soil is well adapted to growth of every variety of grain, and the products annually, not inferior to any farm of its size and force, in the neighborhood; all the hard labor of ditching and clearing now necessary for a course of cropping, in three shifts, has been performed -a few ordinary hands are only necessary to cultivate it to much advantage. The range is extensive for cattle and hogs; the neighbors are truly desirable, independent, friendly, and steady- for health and pure springs of water, it is not surpassed by any in the state; for 6 years there has not been a solitary case of sickness to require a doctor, upon it. Its contiguity to market for all disposable surplus, retired from the public highways, and good order of the neighborhood, screen it entirely from the pilferer. Thus situated, it should become an object of the first importance to a young industrious, married gentleman, who could only begin the world with a very small force, but might, in a few years render himself independent; or to a gentleman of a family, living in the unhealthy vapors of the seasons in the lower part of the country. It also becomes an object of great importance, for health and pleasure during that season. If not sold before the first day of November next, it will be offered at public sale, with crop, stock, utensils, and implements, with four valuable Negro men.
James Williams.
Fred'g Aug. 28, 1824.

The Virginia Herald
September 18, 1824 3:5
For rent, The house at present occupied by W. A. & J. S. Knox on Commerce street, the house fronting 32 feet, and 5 poles, the house and lot all in good order; it is as commodious as any house in town that is to rent, having 6 rooms, and 3 closets, store and compting room, cellar under the whole house, fitted for any purpose, the kitchen one and a half story high with a cellar under it, meat house, &c; the lot enclosed with brick, the 2d story in the house is finished as neatly as any house in the town. Possession given the 6th day of November next, or I will sell the property on very liberal terms. Any person wishing to rent or purchase will please apply to the subscriber.
Robert Ellis.
(Fredericksburg) September 18.

The Virginia Herald
September 25, 1824 3:4
Who bids? To enable me to improve other property, I wish to sell a part of that which I own in and near this place. It consists of a house and lot in town, some unimproved lots, and a farm containing between 160 and 70 acres. The house and lot are in a convenient situation for business, yet sufficiently retired for a private family. There are attached, all the conveniences desirable on such a property- a smoke-house, ice-house, stables, granary, a large office, a never-failing well of pure water, &c. &c. The house has now 7 rooms in it, and at an inconsiderable expense another could be fitted up. This property would suit either a professional man, mechanic, or a person wishing to keep a boarding house, or boarding school. Two of the unimproved lots lie on the main street, and 8 or 10 others which are now attached to the farm, lie on the back street, east of town. The farm is truly the most desirable piece of land of the size, in the country, as well on account of its fertility, as its convenience to town, and the unusual proportion of timber on it. It lies adjoining (and no part of it is much more than a fourth of a mile from) this beautiful little town, which is now rapidly improving, and which, with its neighborhood, affords as many advantages as any in the state, both in relation to business and the pleasure derived from an intelligent, genteel and gay society. Between 80 and 100 acres of land are in timber, most of which is very heavy; it is confidently believed from an experiment which was made, that the timber, or a good part of it, would sell for $100 per acre, for building rails, fire wood, &c. I would rather sell the house and lot than the other property; yet sooner than forego my other plans, I would sell any of it. If the above property is not sold at private sale, I shall on Tuesday the 19th day of October, (it being the 2d day of court) expose to public sale, the house and lot, the town lots, and possibly the farm. The credits, &c. which will be allowed, will be made known on the day of sale. Professional men, mechanics, and even farmers are advised to attend; particularly young mechanics, who for a small sum can purchase lots on which they can establish themselves for life. N.B. I wish to also sell between 800 and 1000 acres of land lying in Dade's Gap, in this county.
Marcus C. Buck.
Culpeper Co. House, Sept. 25, 1824.

The Virginia Herald
October 2, 1824 3:5
Public sale. On the 4th day of next month, (November) if fair, if not, the next fair day, the subscriber will offer for sale, at public auction, (if not sold privately before that day) his plantation situated on Lewis's River, about 9 miles from Fredericksburg, and 4 from Spotsylvania courthouse. In recommending this property he has no hesitation in saying that he knows of no farm of the same size in the county (not bordering on the Rappahannock) containing the same advantages. It is situated in a pleasant neighborhood, contains 400 acres, lying in compact form, with the fields conveniently arranged, each field having an ample supply of water; the fencing in good order; a comfortable dwelling house, with 5 rooms and two portico's; and all necessary out houses- a great variety of fruit trees; the grounds about the house strikingly handsome; the yard and garden newly enclosed- With all, it is surpassed in point of fertility by few tracts in this section of the country, embracing a large portion of red soil, low grounds, and meadow land. The sale will take place on the premises, upon most accommodating terms. A tract containing 200 acres adjoining the above may be purchased with it, the low grounds of which last mentioned tract, suited to the first, would add much to its beauty and value. *Stock for sale Richard T. Banks.
October 2.

The Virginia Herald
October 20, 1824 1:4
Notice. The subscriber will rent his saw mill, situated on Potomac Run, and give immediate possession. The stream affords an abundance of water for at least 7 months of the year, and in wet seasons, such as the last, can saw almost every month. For at least 10 months, in ordinary seasons, it can saw from 800 to 1000 feet per diem. The neighborhood is abundantly supplied with excellent pine and oak timber, some walnut and poplar. The persons adjacent have usually supplied the mill with as much work as it can do on shares without purchasing; and should the tenant not wish to run altogether in that way, he can purchase on reasonable terms any quantity . The saw mill has been recently repaired by Mr. Jervis Davis, and is in first rate order, all the material works having been newly made- with a new imported saw, purchased last January, of best quality. His rent will be $80 per annum, and to accommodate the tenant will take a part payment in plank. He was offered $75 last season, before having made the repairs, and purchasing the saw; but he finds it inconvenient to attend to it, being too much engaged in the line of his profession. If any person should be desirous to rent, it would be well to apply soon.
A. Fitzhugh.
Falmouth, Oct. 16, 1824.

The Virginia Herald
November 3, 1824 3:4
Land & stock for sale. Agreeable to the last will and testament of John Lipscomb, deceased, of Spotsylvania, we shall proceed to sell at public auction, to the highest bidder, on Wednesday, the 24th of November, that valuable tract of land called Meadow-Hill, (the late residence of the deceased,) containing 530 acres, (reserving 1/4 of an acre for a family burying ground) on a credit of one and two years, the purchaser giving bond and approved security, also a deed of trust on the land to secure the payments. The land lies on both sides of the East North East Run, on which there are large and valuable meadows, well set in timothy, and yielding from 40 to 50,000 weight of hay annually. On this tract, there is a large and comfortable dwelling house, quite new- a new barn, ice-house, and all the houses for the comfort and convenience of a large family. On the same day, and at the same place, we shall proceed to sell on the terms above mentioned, that valuable tract of land, called the Old Place, containing 370 acres. -On this tract there is a comfortable dwelling house, barn and kitchen, This tract of land lies on the same run, and on both sides of Holladay's Swamp, affording a large portion of low grounds within two miles of the former- this is considered the best tract of land of its size in this part of the country -also, one small lot of 10 acres, lying immediately on the fork in the road, and adjoining Good-Hope-Meeting-House, on which Mr. John Donaldson at present resides. The land will be shown at any time by Benj. F. Lipscomb, who lives on the Old Place. *Personal estate for sale Thos. Lipscomb, Ira E. Lipscomb, John Lipscomb, Ex'ors.
Nov. 3, 1824.

The Virginia Herald
November 10, 1824 3:4
Land for sale. Being desirous to remove to the southern country, I offer for sale the land on which I reside, containing about 1400 acres. It is bounded by the Rappahannock river on the south, and the great Fauquier road on the north; is well enclosed in convenient shifts, in good order for farming, and distant 3 miles from the town of Fredericksburg. It is susceptible to a convenient division. The lower part of the land, comprising my mansion house tract, called Evergreen, contains about 500 acres; it is proverbial for its health and good water, and has an abundant supply of wood and timber; the improvements are, a comfortable dwelling house, with four rooms on the lower floor and three rooms and a passage on the upper, with every necessary out house, all in good repair; a well enclosed yard and garden & a variety of fruit trees in full bearing, which have been selected with great care. The yard is well shaded with ornamental trees, which in the hot season is very conductive to health and comfort. The residue of the land has been cultivated as a quarter; about half of which is covered with wood and timber; is healthy and well watered, and well enclosed. The improvements are, an overseer's house, a barn, and houses for Negroes. I would divide this latter tract to suit purchasers. I invite persons inclined to purchase to view the land as it is believed it will more than realize any opinion that may be formed from the above description. For terms, which will be very accommodating, apply to the subscriber.
Robert H. Hooe.
Evergreen, Nov. 10, 1824.

The Virginia Herald
January 1, 1825 3:5
Belmont for sale.
There are few farms on the northern neck of Virginia, more desirable than this for fertility of soil and location- it lies in King George County, in a neighborhood not inferior to any in the northern neck of Virginia, and contains 500 acres, more or less. The buildings are 3/4 of a mile from the Potomac River, on an elevated and healthy situation, commanding a very extensive view of the river, and a mile and a half from the Potomac Academy - it abounds in a number of never failing springs of excellent water; has an abundance of timber of the best quality and largest growth, viz: red and white oak, walnut, poplar, ash, locust, and cedar. The buildings consist of a large dwelling house and other necessary houses- a commodious granary and stables, (nearly new,) also, overseer's and servants houses. The terms will be made to suit the times, and by a small payment, the purchaser can have a considerable time on the balance by paying the interest annually. Persons inclined to purchase will address themselves to the subscriber at Hampstead, King George County, Va.
Geo. Fitzhugh Jan. 1, 1825.

The Virginia Herald
February 5, 1825 3:5
For sale, That well known establishment in King George County, Virginia, called Hampstead. The buildings on this place consist of a large and commodious dwelling house, lately thoroughly repaired and added to, a large store house, granary and office; a meat house, kitchen, stable, and hen house, all built the last year, with a well of excellent water in the yard, and the lot under a post and rail enclosure. It is remarkably healthy and pleasantly situated on a considerable height, one mile from the Potomac river, commanding an extensive view of a genteel, wealthy, and populous neighborhood, and less than a mile from the Potomac Academy. The advantages of such a situation to a mercantile gentleman, (it being one of the best stands for a dry goods and mercantile business in the Northern Neck) who has a family of children to educate, are too obvious to need comment; genteel society, acquirement of wealth, education of children, and an opportunity of attending Divine service every other Sabbath at the Academy, are advantages rarely if ever met with in a country situation. Any person wishing to treat for this place by letter, will direct to the subscriber, on the premises.
John England, jun'r.
Hampstead, Va. Feb. 5. 1825.

The Virginia Herald
April 13, 1825 3:4
Land for sale.
I am authorized to sell upon a credit of one, two, and three years (if an immediate sale can be affected) two good tracts of land, in Spotsylvania County, belonging to Capt. L. W. Dangerfield. One contains about 700 acres, called Bleak Hill; one half of which is thought to be in wood of good quality; the cleared part has not been cultivated for three or four years, from which circumstance the advantages to be derived will clearly be seen. This land lies on the south side of the river (Ny) It has on it some good springs, and several small streams running through it. There is a two story dwelling house on this farm, with two rooms and a passage on the lower floor, in tolerable repair. The other is a part of the Coventry Tract, and will contain 5 or 600 acres, to be laid off by nearly a north and south line at the lower end of the tract, which will include the mill seat. -There is no house on this land, but in point of fertility perhaps exceeds the first; nearly two thirds of which is said to be in wood, and that which is cleared, in very good order for cropping to advantage, as it has been rented, except a small part, for a considerable time. This land is well watered; it binds on the north side of the river (Ny) has on it a good spring and several branches running through it. The neighborhood is genteel and might operate as an inducement to purchasers who are fond of civilized society. No more need to be said respecting this land, as it is expected no person will purchase without viewing the premises, which will be shewn by Capt. L. W. Dangerfield, at any time. Application to Thomas Samuel, of Caroline, (near the Reedy Church) or to the subscriber by letter, post paid, will promptly be attended to. I feel that in candor, I risque nothing in recommending this land, which the following circumstances will warrant; it is within about 10 miles of Fredericksburg, well watered, the neighborhood genteel, land tolerably fertile, the neighborhood affording a good custom to the mill when kept in good order, within 5 miles of the courthouse; and above all, it is as healthy a neighborhood as any in the world, and to which many families are repairing from the lower country, from their unhealthy situations.
R. Crutchfield.
April 13, 1825.

The Virginia Herald
May 7, 1825 3:5
Land for sale.
Pursuant to a decretal order of the county court of Stafford, we the subscribers, Commissioners for that purpose appointed shall, in the town of Falmouth, on the 4th day of June next offer for sale, on the premises, to the highest bidder, on a credit of 1, 2, and 3 years, the tract of land, formerly owned by John M. Parsons, and now in the occupation of the widow and heirs of Robert S. Hoffman, in the county of Stafford. -The land is situated about 11 miles above Falmouth, immediately on the main road leading from that place to the upper country; contains about 275 or 80 acres, and has upon it a comfortable dwelling house and convenient out houses for the accommodation of a family. The healthiness of the situation, its contiguity to Falmouth and the great road, the terms upon which it is offered for sale, must render it extremely desirable to any one who wishes to obtain a house and home upon cheap and easy terms, especially to gentlemen who reside in the lower country, to whom it offers a pleasant and safe retreat from the diseases of the summer and fall. Bonds with good security, with a lien on the land, will be required from the purchaser.
John Moncure, James Briggs, Comm'rs.
May 7, 1825.

The Virginia Herald
May 7, 1825 3:5
Land, Negroes, furniture, &c. for sale.
The subscribers having purchased of Mr. John Withers, the farm contiguous to the town of Jefferson, Culpeper County, whereon Henry W. Ashton lately resided, now offer it for sale on accommodating terms, which will be made known on application to either of them, and which if not previously sold will be exposed at auction in the town of Warrenton, on Monday the 23d of May. -The farm contains about 200 acres, has on it a dwelling house, requiring but little repair to render it comfortable; a store house, and almost every convenient and necessary out house. -Possession of the premises will be given immediately, and from the improved state of the fields (some of which are in clover) a purchaser might reasonably expect to reap in the ensuing year a crop of wheat, nearly adequate to the price at which this desirable little farm will be sold. -Of the title, which will be conveyed free from encumbrance, there can be not doubt. *personal estate for sale The attention of those wishing to purchase is earnestly invited.
William R. Fitzhugh, Robert H. Rose, Henry Fitzhugh.
Warrenton, May 7, 1825.

The Virginia Herald
June 18, 1825 3:5
Rackoon-Ford Mills for sale.
The subscribers having purchased the above mills under a deed of trust, but not being acquainted with the milling business, are disposed to sell them very cheap. They lie on the Rapid Ann river, in the counties of Orange and Culpeper, an consist of a manufacturing, saw, grist, and plaster mill; a picking gin and carding machine. The manufacturing mill is undergoing suitable repairs for the next grinding season. The grist mill, &c. are new. This property is so advantageously located that it is believed 25000 bushels of wheat a season commanded with much ease- that the toll from the corn mill will average 250 barrels, and that the saw mill, carding machine, &c. will command a valuable custom under proper management. All persons disposed to engage in the milling business are invited to make a personal inspection, as the subscribers feel confident so good a bargain will rarely be offered in property of this kind.
Jackson Morton, Jere. Morton.
June 18, 1825.

The Virginia Herald
July 18, 1825 3:4
White-Hall ---for sale.
The subscriber designing to remove to a cotton country, as soon as he closes his Executorship of his father's estate, will sell his White Hall estate, containing 600 acres; rather more than half of which is composed of Matapony flat and low grounds, in quality inferior as a body to none on the river. A considerable proportion of the hills have been improved by manure. This estate lies on the main stage road from Fredericksburg to Richmond, and is 15 miles from Fredericksburg, and 9 from a public landing on the Rappahannock. The fertility of the soil, commodiousness of the improvement as to dwelling house, barns, stables, and all necessary out houses, the beauty and healthiness of the situation, and agreeableness of neighborhood, render White Hall, by the estimation of all who know it, one of the most desirable seats on the Matapony River, from which the house is situated on a commanding eminence, a mile and a half distant, overlooking the whole flat which spreads in front from the house to the river bank. Persons desirous of purchasing are invited to call on the subscriber at White Hall, who will show the premises and receive proposals for private sale until the 10th September next; they will, if not privately sold, be offered at Veillboro, which joins the estate. The terms will be cash for half, and 12 months for the balance of the purchase money, to be secured by a deed of trust on the land, and negotiable notes with approved endorsers.
Jno. B. Woodford.
White-Hall, July 18, 1825.

The Virginia Herald
July 28, 1825 3:5
Benvenue for sale.
I offer for sale, on accommodating terms, my farm situated on the road leading to Richmond by Cropp's and Goodall's, in a genteel, wealthy, and agreeable neighborhood, 7 miles from Fredericksburg. The tract contains 391 acres, and adjoins the lands of Major Dudley and Richard Hill. The improvements are, a commodious dwelling house, 2 stories, 3 rooms on each floor, with all the necessary out houses, an ice house, barns, stables, and carriage house, &c. the whole in complete repair. The yards and garden are handsomely improved, and contiguous to the house is a never failing spring of most excellent water. -The subscriber considers the above description sufficient to those who wish to purchase such a property to examine for themselves. -It is an unexaggerated statement, and those who may take the trouble to view the premises will discover that in beauty and healthiness of situation, value of improvements and fertility of soil, the farm now offered is excelled by none in its neighborhood. For terms, &c. apply to Mr. John S. Wellford, or to the advertiser.
David Henderson.
Fred'g, July 28, 1825.

The Virginia Herald
August 13, 1825 3:4
Matapony land for sale.
I will sell my tract of land, containing some very valuable low grounds, finely timbered, on the Matapony River, and lying adjacent to the farms of Doc. A. C. White, John Gatewood, and Lawrence Catlett, esq. The greater proportion of this tract is upland (by which I do not mean forest land) and well adapted to the growth of cotton. The low grounds afford soil fully capable of producing excellent crops of tobacco and corn: which the corn crops now on the farm will prove. It is about 10 or 12 miles from Fredericksburg, and contains 500 acres. Persons wishing to purchase lands, had best view this farm, as a bargain may be had, on account of its distance from any present place of residence. It will be shown by my brother, F. W. Battaile, residing near the premises. One third of the money must be paid when possession is given; the balance in two equal annual installments. Bonds with approved security will be required, to bear interest from the date if not punctually paid, and a deed of trust on the land to secure the payment of the money. The price can be known by application to my father, or brother, above mentioned, or to the subscriber near Upperville, Loudoun County.
Lawrence Battaile, Jr.
August 13, 1825.

The Virginia Herald
August 27, 1825 3:4
To rent, The two-story brick tenement, at the lower end of Main-street, lately occupied by Thos. Hord- with commodious kitchen, stable and meat-house, and a large garden, well filled with vegetables. -Possession given immediately. -For terms apply to Peter Hord.
Aug. 27, 1825.

The Virginia Herald
August 27, 1825 3:5
A valuable estate for sale.
The subscriber offers for sale, the tract of land, on which he resides, containing about 800 acres, of which there are about 600 acres of Rappahannock flat, in natural fertility, equal to any on the river- a considerable proportion of which might be converted into valuable meadow. From universal experiments, the soil proves remarkably favourable to the use of plaster, and the whole farm is capable to the highest improvement, embracing a quantity of that red loam so highly esteemed, being remarkably well adapted to the growth of corn, wheat, tobacco, and cotton. The soil of the upland is of good quality, favourable to the growth of both corn and wheat. There is scarcely an acre of sandy land on the whole tract. Upwards of 100 acres are in wood, affording an abundant supply for the use of the farm. A variety of fruit trees of different kinds. The house is commodious and calculated for the accommodation of a large family. The water is excellent; the situation pleasant, and generally healthy, -the prospect beautiful. The farm is well supplied with a number of never failing springs. The subscriber will show the land to any person inclined to view it, and make known the terms.
Lawrence Battaile.
Prospect Hill, Aug. 27, 1825.

The Virginia Herald
August 31, 1825 3:4
Fontainbleau for sale or rent.
This desirable farm, 4 1/2 miles from Fredericksburg, on the Rappahannock River, may be had on such terms that would suit any industrious farmer. The tract contains 709 acres, and fully one half may be said to be heavily timbered. There is attached to the premises an excellent grist and saw mill, on a never failing stream. The average toll is from 7 to 7 1/2 bushels of corn per week, besides wheat, rye, &c. The saw mill has yielded $800 per annum. The wood sold generally from $750 to $800. The improvements are an overseer's house, with three rooms, (easily enlarged for the accommodation of any family) a new kitchen lately built, a neat barn, shedded all around, an excellent stone spring house, with cabins sufficient for the accommodation of 25 or 30 Negroes. Any person wishing to purchase the above farm, can have it on reasonable terms, by paying 1/6 of the purchase money in hand, and for the balance, a credit of 5 years will be allowed; on the executing bonds, and a deed in trust to secure the after payments, with interest from the date. As an inducement to any person with a healthy residence, I can assure them that my medical account for the last 11 years has not in the aggregate exceeded $10. The premises will be shown by the subscriber. If this land is not sold in the month of September, it will then be rented to two good tenants upon shares, or for a monied rent, as can be agreed upon.
Rob't. Lewis.
Fred'g Aug. 31, 1825.

The Virginia Herald
September 7, 1825 3:5
Meadow Hill for sale.
This land lies in Caroline County, immediately on the stage road leading from Fredericksburg to Richmond, 12 1/2 miles from the first place and 7 to the Rappahannock River, containing nearly 600 acres. About 80 acres of this land is valuable low grounds, 30-odd of which is reclaimed, part in grass and the balance in corn- this land is capable of producing from 4 to 5000 weight of hay per acre. The improvements consist of a large two story dwelling house and other out houses. The dwelling house is situated on an eminence overlooking a good deal of the farm. The land joins the Veilleboro tract, Mr. Charles Buckner's and others. -Any gentleman who wishes to reside in a healthy and agreeable neighborhood, would do well to call and view the premises, as I will sell a bargain. If not sold privately before the second Monday in October, it will on that day be offered publicly at the Bowling Green. Terms of sale will be cash for half, and 12 months for the balance, to be secured by a deed of trust on the land.
John T. Dillard, Adm'r of Thos. Dillard, dec'd with the will annexed.
Caroline, Sept. 5, 1825.

The Virginia Herald
September 7, 1825 3:5
Caroline land for sale.
Intending to leave the state, I shall offer at public sale on the premises, on Thursday the 29th inst. the plantation on which I now reside containing 193 acres. There is a comfortable dwelling and all necessary out houses, with a never failing spring within a few yards of the door; a sufficient quantity of wood land for the support of the farm, which is well enclosed. The society in the neighborhood is genteel and agreeable, and in point of health is not surpassed by any place on the Mattapony. To any gentleman wishing a summer residence, with a small expense it could be made a most desirable retreat. At the same time and place will be sold, (Personal estate) . . . For the land, on third of the purchase money will be required, the balance in two equal annual installments, secured by a deed of trust. Should the land not be sold, it will be rented for a term of years.
Thomas Conway.
Sept. 7, 1825.

The Virginia Herald
October 15, 1825 1:3
The subscriber will rent for the ensuing year, between 8 and 900 acres of land situated on Potomac creek, being part of the estate of the late Cary Seldon and the property of Miss Ann Cary Seldon, a minor. -It is deemed unnecessary to describe minutely the character and advantages of this farm; suffice it to say that the soil is various and produces abundantly all the various crops adapted to our climate. -There are on the farm a good grist mill, a large stone barn containing an efficient threshing machine, and all the necessary out houses. -nearly one-third part of this land consists of low grounds, as productive as any on the Potomac in wheat, corn, timothy, &c. -The subscriber, according to circumstances, will either divide the above farm into three parts, (a division which its localities seem to invite) or rent it entire. -Before the end of the present month more than 200 bushels of wheat will have been sowed in the neatest manner; which, by the contemplated division of the farm, will be thrown in suitable proportions on two of the tenements; on the third the mill is situated. The above estate will be shown by the overseer, Mr. Cornelius Brazley. For terms apply to William H. Fitzhugh, Guardian of S. A. C. Seldon.
Stafford County, 5th Oct. 1825.

The Virginia Herald
October 19, 1825 3:4
For sale, My plantation, in the county of Spotsylvania, called Stanfield, situated on one of the branches of Mattapony River, about 15 miles from Fredericksburg. The tract contains 700 acres. The improvements consist of a large dwelling house, kitchen, laundry, comfortable Negro cabins and stables; none of which, however are in very good repair. The land is equal, if not superior, to any tract in the immediate neighborhood of it. A great bargain will be sold if a sale can be effected in the course of the present year; the purchaser may have immediate possession, and a long credit will be given, on having the payment of the purchase money satisfactorily secured. The land will be divided into lots to suit purchasers, provided the whole can be sold. For terms apply to Col. Jno. Stanard, or R. S. Chew, Fred'g.
Robert Stanard.
Oct. 19, 1825.

The Virginia Herald
October 26, 1825 3:5
Valuable land for sale.
I will sell, on accommodating terms, or exchange for lands in the lower country, a valuable farm in Fauquier County, containing 300 acres. It is situated on the road leading from Fredericksburg to Winchester, about a mile below Salem, and 12 miles from the courthouse- it being the farm on which Mr. Thomas Yerby formerly resided. The improvements consist of a commodious two story brick house, 36 feet square, with three rooms and a passage, or entry, on each floor- a convenient cellar, and all necessary out houses. The land is of good quality and well adapted to the use of clover and plaster. It is divided into 5 50-acre fields, with good enclosures: The estate is particularly desirable to a gentleman who wishes to obtain a summer retreat, as the situation is high & healthy, and the neighborhood populous and agreeable. -Persons wishing to purchase will address themselves to me.
John Pratt.
Fredericksburg, Oct. 26.

The Virginia Herald
October 26, 1825 3:5
Valuable land for sale.
By virtue of a deed in trust from Robert Patton to me, I shall offer for public sale, on the third Monday in November next, before the door of the Culpeper court house, that elegant estate, lying on the main road to Culpeper court house, between Stevensburg and Georgetown, and bounded by the lands of George Thom, Samuel Slaughter and others. The tract contains about 1500 acres, 900 of which (by estimation) is cleared and of the finest quality; the residue well timbered. The improvements consist of a dwelling house, with the out houses necessary for the accommodation of a family; a spacious barn, corn-house, &c. &c. with cabins for Negroes. The land will be sold on the following accommodating terms: -A credit of three years from the day of sale will be given for the whole purchase money, but to bear interest from that date. The interest to be made payable annually. The whole to be secured by deed of trust on the land, and in addition to this, either bond or security, or other landed security, to be approved by the trustee at the election of the purchaser.
R. Patton, jr.
Oct. 26, 1825.

The Virginia Herald
November 19, 1825 3:4
Long credit.
Will be sold to the highest bidder, (on the premises) on Thursday the 15th of December ensuing, my farm, known by the name of Massaponax, lying on the Massaponax Run, in the county of Spotsylvania. The farm contains 900 acres, more than half of which is now in wood. Of the cleared land there is from 80 to 100 acres low grounds, well adapted to the growth of corn and grass, and if properly drained would no doubt produce good crops of small grain. A portion of the high land which has once been cleared, has since grown up in pine and cedar. There is a mill, which with a little repair might be made profitable. As persons who are disposed to purchase will view the farm and judge for themselves, I will merely add, this farm is only 6 miles distant from Fredericksburg, and is in a remarkably healthy neighborhood. My Overseer (Mr. Haslop,) now living on the farm, will show it to any person wishing to view it. Terms of sale, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years. The purchaser to give his bonds with approved security, and a deed of trust on the land. The land may be purchased privately, by application to the subscriber residing in Orange.
George Morton.
Nov. 19, 1825.

The Virginia Herald
February 4, 1826 3:2
The subscriber wishes to dispose of his summer residence, in the county of Culpeper, near Stevensburg, called Blooming Hill, containing 15 acres of land, of which from 3 to 4 are neatly enclosed with the best materials, in a yard and garden. This beautiful situation commands an uninterrupted view of the Blue Ridge for upwards of 150 miles, and for salubrity of climate, no spot can surpass it. There is a very commodious dwelling house upon it, lately painted and repaired, with two rooms, a cellar the whole length of the house, also an excellent kitchen, meat-house, carriage-house, and stable for 3 horses, a well of excellent water in the yard. To a professional gentleman or one who wishes to procure a healthy situation, he had as well locate himself here as any where else. For terms, apply to Wm. Bernard.
Mansfield, Feb. 1, 1826.

The Virginia Herald
February 11, 1826 3:4
Thistle Mill for sale.
The subscribers offer for sale their milling establishment, in this place, known by the name of Thistle Mill, to include the brick warehouse adjoining the mill. -as also the lot and, on which is a dwelling house for the miller, with a garden, cooper's shop, and barrel house. The mill is covered with imported tile and the warehouse with slate. It is deemed unnecessary here to be more particular in describing the property, as it is presumed its character in every respect is well known. It may however be said, that in addition to this mill having a preference in the water when it is scarce, its value is enhanced full 50%, since the cutting of a new canal lately, through a rock, at an expense exceeding $3,000, by which the whole of the water in the north branch of the river is conducted down the race, without having resort to a dam. The mill is in perfect good order, in all respects, with 4 pair of 6 feet burr stones and a pair of stone rubbers, and every other species of machinery that is necessary or useful in manufacturing flour. The terms will be known on application to Messrs. John and Wright Southgate, of Norfolk, or to the subscriber.
James Vass.
Falmouth, Feb. 11, 1826.

The Virginia Herald
March 29, 1826 3:4
Valuable property for sale.
Will be sold, on Tuesday the 11th of April, the houses and lot on the back street, the residence of Mr. William James. It is deemed unnecessary to give a minute description of the property, as it is well known. There is on the lot one two story dwelling house in good repair, a two story brick kitchen; attached to it is a comfortable room suitable for an office, also a large wooden tenement containing 2 apartments; a very productive garden, which renders the above property valuable for a family; the situation is remarkably healthy and delightful, particularly in the summer season. *Personal estate for sale. Terms made known on the day of sale. By order of the Trustee, A. Buck, Auct'r.
March 29, 1826.

The Virginia Herald
April 5, 1826 3:5
A great bargain.
From the advanced stage of life of the subscriber, added to a recent severe spell of sickness, which has racked his constitution much, has determined him to sell, at a very reduced price, the following tracts of land- to wit: One tract called Johnston's, containing 223 acres, lying on the head branches of Gravelly-Run. About 130 acres of this land is in its virgin state; 18 or 20 acres is rich swamp, that would grow fine tobacco or grass; about 40 acres is covered with pine & cedar; a great proportion of the pine is large, and would make fine scantling; the rest of the land is fit for cultivation, and brings fine corn and wheat. The only building on the land is a very large old mansion house, out of repair, but might be made comfortable with a small expense, as the frame, floors, &c. are sound and good. Another piece near the first containing 60 acres, all in wood, of fine thriving growth; part of which would bring good tobacco. Also, 200 acres. part of which is called Farish's tract, all in wood, having a great deal of fine timber on it for building; it is allowed to be equal if not superior, to any high land in the county. The whole of these lands is about 8 miles from Fredericksburg. *Land in Kentucky. Any one wishing to by any of these lands can get information by applying to Mr. Wm. Jackson Jr. who is authorized to sell any part or the whole; or to the subscriber.
Tho. Minor.
Spotsylvania, April 5, 1826.

The Virginia Herald
May 13, 1826 3:5
Valuable estate for sale or exchange.
The subscriber wishes to sell or exchange the land whereon he now resides, containing 860 acres, lying in Spotsylvania county, on the road leading from Fredericksburg to Orange Springs, 20 miles from the former and 12 from the latter place. On this estate is a manufacturing and grist mill, and by one skilled in the manufacturing business, much might be done. As to the grist mill, it is considered decidedly the best in the county, having almost constant employment, and would be a good stand for a grocery or dry good store, under proper management. The tract is fully equal or superior to any in the neighborhood. -The improvements are a new dwelling house, well fitted for the most genteel family, having been lately finished off in the best manner, neatly painted inside and out, with all necessary out houses, garden &c. The situation is high, pleasant, and as handsome as any in the county, with a never failing spring of as good water as any in the state. The plantation is in good order, and contains from 350 to 400 acres of cleared land, the balance in wood. Any person from the lower country or elsewhere, who wants a pleasant country residence in a good neighborhood, would do well to own this property. The modes of payment will be accommodating. The subscriber will either sell for cash, young Negroes, or long credit, or exchange for lands of good quality and title in Tennessee, Kentucky, or on the Kenawha River in Virginia. Persons wishing to own this estate will make immediate application.
John White.
Spotsylvania Co. May 13, 1826.

The Virginia Herald
May 31, 1826 3:3
Land for sale.
I offer for sale at private contract, the tract of land on which I now reside, called Libnah, containing 591 acres, situated in the county of Caroline, on the Mount Swamp, within a mile and a half of the Rappahannock River, 7 from Port-Royal and 15 from Fredericksburg. It has about 80 acres of low grounds, lying on the creek, which is in good order for cultivation, all of which produces corn and oats remarkably well, and a great part is very well adapted to wheat. The high land is in very good heart, and produces fine crops of the above mentioned grain, as well as cotton. There is a quantity of very valuable timber on it. Persons wishing to purchase are requested to come forward and view this tract of land, as I will sell a great bargain on very accommodating terms.
Benj'n C. Coghill.
May 31, 1826.

The Virginia Herald
July 8, 1826 3:5
Land for sale.
I wish to sell, or exchange for property in town, my farm, situated on Lewis River, about 9 miles from Fredericksburg and 4 from Spotsylvania courthouse-- in recommending this property I have no hesitation in saying, that I know of no farm of the same size in the county, not bordering on the Rappahannock, containing the same advantages. It is situated in a healthy, pleasant, and agreeable neighborhood, containing 410 acres, lying in a compact form, with the fields conveniently arranged, each field having an ample supply of water; the fencing in good order and mostly new; a comfortable dwelling house with 5 rooms, convenient closets, and two porticoes; ice and all necessary out houses, a great variety of fruit trees, the ground about the house strikingly handsome, the yard and garden newly enclosed. With all, it is surpassed in point of fertility by few tracts in this section of the country, embracing a large portion of red soil, low grounds and meadow land. -Possession may be had the first of January, 1827, with permission to seed this fall. Mr. Littleton Leavell, manager on the farm, will show the place to any person who wishes to view it; or application may be made to me in Fredericksburg for terms, which will be moderate. *Personal estate also for sale.
George Rothrock, Jun.
July 8, 1826.

The Virginia Herald
July 12, 1826 3:5
The subscriber wishes to dispose of his elegant estate, called Elkwood lying in the county of Culpeper, and state of Virginia. This estate has generally been considered equal, if not superior, to any in the state. It lies at the Junction of the Elk and Hedgman Rivers, which form the Rappahannock. It is in a healthy and agreeable neighborhood, 30 miles distant from Fredericksburg. The Yew Hill, which is laid down in the map of Virginia, forms the upper part of this tract: the soil is various, and has been found capable of producing, in the greatest perfection, any thing that can be raised in the state, viz: wheat, tobacco, corn, rye, oats, cotton and vines of every description. The situation is pleasant, and as handsome as any in the state, with a number of never failing springs of water; Ruffin's Run passes through the estate; and at one time there was a merchant mill on it. The stream is a never failing one, and with a little expense might be erected a grist mill that would be profitable, the dam being already built. The run affords upwards of 100 acres first rate meadow ground; a large portion of which is now in timothy. The farm contains about 1400 acres of land, and upwards of 600 of that portion low grounds, on which a corn crop was never known to fail- about 500 acres are in good timber. This tract I would divide to suit purchasers. The improvements are a dwelling house 60 feet square, two stories high, with a portico in front, the whole length above and below- the drawing room and passage stuccoed, and the house generally is furnished off in the best and neatest style. There are 6 rooms in the cellar, all of which are paved with brick; a brick kitchen with an office above; a weaving house and house for servants; a meat-house, carriage-house and stable, with overseer's house, barn, corn-house, Negro cabins, and a very large house 54 by 41 feet, for the reception of either wheat or tobacco, with a threshing machine fixed in it; all of which are new and faithfully built. There is a large apple orchard, which affords a variety of excellent fruit. The subscriber will sell at private bargain, and at that event will withdraw the advertisement; but if it should not be sold privately, before the 1st of September, it will be offered publicly on that day- one bid being reserved. But in the event of its not being either publicly or privately disposed of, I will rent a large portion of the land to one or two good tenants. This property merits the attention of persons wishing to invest funds in real estate, as it is very seldom such property is brought into market.
Jno. S. Thornton.
July 12, 1826.

The Virginia Herald
July 15, 1826 1:2
Advertisement.
Will be let to the lowest bidder, at Westmoreland Courthouse, on Monday the 24th instant, (it being court day,) the building of a new jail, for said county, of the following description: -36 feet long, 16 feet wide, two stories high, with two rooms 12 feet square and a 6 feet passage on each floor, a flight of steps leading from the lower passage to the one above, with one out-door from the lower passage; 2 eight-light windows to each room, and one to each passage, to be secured with iron grates; the body of the house to be of brick, with studs 8 inches apart, lined with white oak plank one and a quarter inches thick, the roof to be of slate; one brick chimney with two fireplaces, the back and funnel of one of them to be secured with iron bars; one of the rooms on the upper floor to be lined with sheet iron, the doors of two of the apartments to be double, and well secured with locks, bolts, &c. and also lined with sheet iron; the other 3 doors to be made of strong materials, with suitable locks, &c. Bond with approved security will be required of the undertaker, and the payments will be as follows-$1000 on the execution of the bond, $500 when the roof shall be covered, and the balance on the 1st day of November, 1827.
William M. Walker, H. Hungerford, Comm'rs.
July 8, 1826.

The Virginia Herald
September 2, 1826 3:4
Valuable Potowmac land for sale.
Being desirous of moving to some town, for the purpose of educating my children, I will on Monday the 25th inst. if fair, if not the next fair day, offer at public auction on the premises, to the highest bidder, the estate, on which I now reside, about 50 miles from the District of Columbia, adjoining the lands of Col. John G. Stuart, Wm. F. Grymes, and Geo. N. Grymes, (and opposite an estate of Col. John Tayloe, in Maryland, called Waterloo,) containing 676 acres. Among the many advantages this estate possesses, are the following, viz: Its remarkable healthiness, compact situation (being an oblong square, bounded by the Potomac on one side, the other three lines recently established and marked, a controversy about which can never occur,) the ease, and small expense with which the produce can be shipped to market, the society of the neighborhood, (being equal to any in the state for peace and harmony,) the steam boat from Washington to Potomac Creek, passing every day, during the summer season, within 3 or 4 miles off, and the boat from the former place to Norfolk to Richmond, once a week by this seat, so that any person owning property above, can every day, and any person below, once a week, visit it. The river for a mile or more in extent, affords a fine beach, and deep water for seine hauling, for winter spring, and summer fish, to any extent desired; and the bank for 1/2 or 3/4 that distance, is an inexhaustible body of rich shell marl, (the quality of which has been satisfactorily tested,) easily, and comparatively with little expense, (with a machine which I have erected,) placed on the top of the bank. The quality of the land is very good, and well adapted to the growth of all kinds of grain, grass, cotton, &c. From half to 2/3 cleared and well watered. The improvements consist in part of a substantial dwelling house, situated on an eminence about 3/4 of a mile from the river, with 6 rooms, a fire place in each-- 5 convenient closets, and good cellars, kitchen, smoke-house, dairy, pigeon house, (well stocked ) a well near the kitchen, granaries, corn-houses, stables, overseer's house with two rooms, a fire place in each; in fine, every house necessary for a farm, all in good repair, and an excellent orchard. The fences both outer and division, are of the best and most durable materials, viz: locust, cedar and chestnut, the peculiar growth of the land. The terms, which will be very accommodating, will be made known the day of sale. Gentlemen wishing to purchase real property, will perhaps never have a better opportunity.
Benjamin Grymes.
Somerset, King George Co. Sept. 2, 1826.

The Virginia Herald
December 30, 1826 3:4
Will be sold, to the highest bidder, on Wednesday, the 10th day of January, 1827, the plantation whereon Mr. Martin Hicks at present resides, containing 251 3/4 acres, lying near Corbin's Bridges, and adjoining the land of Mr. Jacob Herndon and others. I think I may say with propriety it is inferior to no tract of the same size in the settlement- about 2/3 uncleared - 30 acres or thereabouts of prime low grounds with a pretty good meadow which can be enlarged as the proprietor may think best. The dwelling house is about 36 feet in length, with two rooms below stairs and a passage and two above- three of the rooms and passage has been lately plastered and whitewashed-there is also an excellent apple orchard of forward and late fruit. The above farm will be shown to any person by Mr. Hicks who may wish to view it previous to the day of sale. *Stock for sale. The terms of sale will be as follows for the land- 1/2 to be paid on making the deed, the balance in 1 and 2 years, by giving bond and approved security or a deed of trust on the land. The above property is in a healthy and desirable neighborhood.
W. Waller.
Spotsylvania County, Dec. 30.

The Virginia Herald
January 10, 1827 3:3
Thistle Mill The subscribers offer for sale their milling establishment in this place, known by the name of Thistle Mill, to include the brick store and ware-house adjoining -as also the island, contiguous to the mill, on which is a dwelling house, with a garden, coopers shop and barrel house. -There is also attached to the property about 30 acres of land, on the margin of the river, through which the Race passes. It is deemed unnecessary here to be more particular in describing this property, as it is presumed its character is well known in the neighborhood. It may be said however that in addition to this mill having preference in the water when it is scarce- its value is enhanced fully 50% since the cutting of a new canal lately through a rock at an expense exceeding $3000, by which the whole of the water in the north branch of the river is conducted down the Race without having to resort to a dam. The mill is of brick, covered with imported tile- 48 by 52 feet, and the ware-house with slate, 60 by 33 feet. There are in the mill four pair of 6 feet stones of excellent quality, and but little worn, and a pair of stone rubbers, and every other species of machinery necessary and useful in manufacturing flour. When this property was advertised before, an idea seemed to be entertained, that the owners had some other object in view than an actual sale- this however was not the case, and any person wishing to become a purchaser may expect a great bargain, by applying to either John and Wright Southgate of Norfolk, or to James Vass.
Falmouth, 10th Jan. 1827.

The Virginia Herald
January 20, 1827 3:2
Potomac land for sale.
In pursuance of a decree of the Superior Court of Chancery for the Fredericksburg District- we shall, on Monday the 12th of March next, at Stafford Courthouse, offer for sale to the highest bidder at public auction, a tract of land, belonging to the estate of John Cooke, deceased, supposed to contain about 900 acres. This land is situated in the county of Stafford nearly opposite the landing of the Potomac Steamboat Company, bounded on the north by Accokeek, south by Potomac Creek, navigable for boats of 20 tons to the upper part of the south line, and east and west by the land of the heirs of T. Daniel. On the premises are a dwelling, in good repair, containing 4 rooms and one portico, a kitchen, meat and corn house, with comfortable houses for an overseer and servants, exclusive of two detached houses suitable for tenants; a barn 40 by 20 feet, shedded three-fourths round, a large, young, thriving peach orchard with a few young trees of select apple. The springs in each field are pure and numerous. Few tracts of land in Stafford surpass the above in situation or fertility- about one-third being low land of first quality-the soil particularly adapted to meadows; 10 or 12 acres of which is now in timothy, and about 30 can be added the ensuing spring. The high land is heavily wooded, and surpassed by none in the neighborhood for easy culture and productiveness, and can conveniently be divided, leaving to each nearly an equal quantity of low and wood land. An accurate survey shall be made previous to the day of sale. Terms of sale, a credit of 6, 12, and 18 months will be given. Bond with security, and a deed of trust on the property will be required to secure the punctual payments.
John Cooke, Geo. M. Cooke, Ex'ors of John Cooke, deceased Jan. 20, 1827.

The Virginia Herald
February 21, 1827 3:5
A valuable farm for sale.
The subscriber intending to move to the western country, offers for sale the tract of land on which he resides, containing between 800 and 1000 acres. This tract lies within 3 miles of the Orange Springs, and 28 of Fredericksburg- adjoining the land of Josiah White and others. The improvements are a dwelling house, (which is large, convenient & well finished with an excellent cellar) an ice house, a good kitchen, and all other necessary houses; all of which are new and in good repair, together with a good apple and peach orchard. The greater part of this land is in woods, the balance well enclosed and in a state of cultivation, well adapted to the growth of wheat, corn and tobacco; it is well watered and has good meadows, which produce from 20 to 30,000 wt. of hay, annually. The neighborhood and society are excelled by none; the situation is not only a handsome one, but healthy. It is deemed unnecessary to give a further description of this desirable farm, as it is believed that any person wishing to purchase will view for himself. -Terms of sale will be accommodating. The premises can be seen at any time, upon application to the subscriber.
P.S. Will sell the whole or any part, to suit purchasers.
Hezekiah Ellis.
Spotsylvania, Feb. 21, 1827.

The Virginia Herald
May 19, 1827 3:5
Valuable Rappahannock land for sale.
The subscriber offers for sale the farm on which he resides, 9 or 10 miles below Fredericksburg, on the road to Port Royal, containing 800 acres, about 600 of which are Rappahannock flat- in natural fertility, equal to any on the river; a considerable proportion of which might be easily converted into valuable meadows. The soil being remarkably well adapted to the production of timothy and herd grass. From several experiments made on different parts of the farm, it proves remarkably favourable to the use of plaster and clover; and the whole is capable of the highest improvement, embracing a quantity of that red loam, so highly esteemed. The soil of the upland is of excellent quality, favourable to the production of both corn and wheat- upwards of 100 acres are in wood, affording an abundant supply for the use of the farm. The house is commodious and calculated for the accommodation of a large family- the situation pleasant and generally healthy- the prospect beautiful. The farm lies remarkably compact and convenient, and is well supplied with a number of never failing springs of excellent water, and a variety of fruit of different kinds. One third of the purchase money will be required on the first of January next, when possession will be given: the balance in two annual payments. Liberty of seeding small grain will be given this fall, and there is a chance of a large crop of wheat being made the succeeding year. For further particulars apply to Law. Battaile.
Prospect Hill, May 19, 1827.

The Virginia Herald
May 26, 1827 3:5
For sale, 9 tracts of valuable land.
1440 acres called Springfield, in Culpeper County, on the waters of the Rappahannock River, whereon the subscriber now lives, 8 miles from Culpeper courthouse, 12 from Orange and 12 from Madison courthouse. This tract is highly improved; the dwelling house is two stories high, 86 feet long, including the wings, and 32 feet wide, 7 rooms on the first floor, all with fire-places; 2 passages, one 12 by 32, the other 10 by 30; 2 large closets; 6 rooms on the second floor, with 4 fire-places, and a passage 12 by 32; 3 rooms in the cellar, with 1 fire-place, and a passage 8 by 30; all necessary out houses, kitchen, wash-house, spring- house, ice-house, pigeon-house, &c; a stable, 72 by 24, two stories high and shedded all around, stalls for 30 horses, and the upper story will contain hay sufficient to winter them. -The plantation is well enclosed, divided into 6 fields, two large meadows running in a half circle round the house, and contains about 40 acres; two clover lots, well taken, orchards, &c. -One half of this tract is in very valuable timber, red and white oak, poplar, locust, &c. This tract is uncommonly well watered, having upwards of 30 good springs, and two creeks; every field and lot has constant running water; 3 fine springs at the edge of the yard. This property may be purchased at $16 per acre; one third paid in good bonds, well secured, and 8 equal annual payments for the balance, with interest. This tract may be divided into two tracts. 400 acres near the above tract, equal to any in the neighborhood, with comfortable improvements, uncommonly well watered, two fine springs near the house; one half in very heavy timber of the best kind, of white and red oak, poplar and ash. This land has about 100 acres of very valuable meadow land; the situation healthy, comfortable and handsome, and lies level and well. 276 acres adjoining the last tract, one third in timber, a new two story house, raised and covered in, 44 by 18. This valuable land has a beautiful situation. 100 acres, adjoining the two last tracts, with a grist mill with two pair of stones, bolting cloth, and a machine for breaking plaster- also a valuable saw mill. 150 acres in the same neighborhood, one third in timber. This is a comfortable situation for a small family. 6 or 7 families might be accommodated on the fore-going lands.
*Land in Ohio and Kentucky Any of the aforesaid tracts of land may be purchased on very moderate and accommodating terms, on application to Philip Slaughter Springfield, May, 1827.

The Virginia Herald
June 6, 1827 3:5
Land for sale.
900 acres, lying in Frederick County, Virginia, on the main road leading from Winchester to Shepherdstown, and within 8 miles of Winchester, which road is now turnpiking. This land is of tolerably good quality, well watered, and about one half in timber. There is a mill seat on the said land and an excellent place for a tan-yard. It has also one of the best white sulphur springs in the valley, near the road. I will sell this land low and any number of acres to suit purchasers. I will take Negroes or good paper, if the purchaser cannot pay money. If I barter for Negroes, they will be for my own use, as I have land now rented out and wish to cultivate it. Any one wishing to purchase will apply to the subscriber, living on the above mentioned road, in Jefferson County, 11 miles from Winchester.
Thomas Campbell.
June 6, 1827.

The Virginia Herald
June 20, 1827 3:5
Valuable property for sale. The subscriber is anxious to sell that valuable farm, situated in the county of Spotsylvania, upon the Massaponax River, called Eastern View, the summer residence of the late Robert S. Chew. -This farm is 5 miles below Fredericksburg, and contains, by recent survey, 1040 1/2 acres; about 250 acres of this tract are cleared, and the greater part of it flat land, inferior to none in its vicinity; the residue is heavily timbered with oak, hickory, pine and walnut. The soil is admirably adapted to the culture of corn, wheat, &c. -The land is well watered and has some valuable meadow ground upon it. There are good orchards of apples, peaches, cherries, &c. with a great variety of other choice fruit trees, planted within a few years. The improvements upon the farm are highly valuable. They consist of a large and commodious brick dwelling house, recently erected, with all other convenient houses for the accommodation of a family; kitchen, ice-house, overseer's house, and houses for Negroes, all perfectly new; a large garden, beautifully laid out, a well of pure water, with good springs near the house, are among the numerous advantages of this seat. The dwelling house is handsomely situated on a mount well improved, and overlooks all that portion of the farm which is cleared and can be in cultivation. Upon the farm is a mill, almost new, with two pair of stones, one for corn, and one for wheat; also a machine for breaking and grinding plaster of Paris. The mill has an extensive custom, and grinds throughout the year, unless the season is uncommonly dry. The society around is unexceptionable, and the healthiness of the situation, together with its contiguity to the best market in the country, all serve to render it worthy the attention of any one wishing a comfortable country residence- Terms of sale accommodating. Those wishing to purchase will apply to Robert Stanard, Esq, residing in Richmond, or to the subscriber in Fredericksburg.
J. J. Chew, Executor of R. S. Chew, deceased.
Fredericksburg, June 20, 1827.

The Virginia Herald
June 22, 1827 3:5
Valuable property for sale.
Under two deeds of trust from Thomas Goodwin to the subscriber, for the purpose therein set forth, I shall offer for sale, to the highest bidder, on the premises, on the first day of August next, on accommodating terms then to be made known, the following property: -The stores and dwelling house on Caroline street, lately occupied by Mr. T. Goodwin, and Messrs. Middleton, and now in the occupancy of Col. Wm. F. Gray, and Mr. Eliason, 50 feet front with a 5 foot alley, running back to Water Street, with every necessary out-house and in good repair. The dwelling is large, having 8 well finished rooms above stairs with a fire-place in each. The stand is equal to any in town for any sort of mercantile business, or a tavern, being at the intersection of Caroline and Commerce Streets, and leading to the bridge erecting by Judge Coulter. The large stone warehouse, back of the above, on Water Street, having three floors, and being well calculated to receive grain and flour. This property is fire-proof and well worth the attention of capitalists. -Also the brick warehouse and stable on the same lot with the last mentioned warehouse. -One other lot on the New Turnpike road, about 72 feet front, adjoining the land of Mr. Samuel Gordon.
William J. Roberts, Trustee.
Fredericksburg, June 22d, 1827.

The Virginia Herald
July 18, 1827 3:5
For sale, that valuable estate called Belvoir, in the county of Spotsylvania, the residence of the late William Herndon. -It is advantageously watered by the Massaponax- containing about 700 acres, and is distant 6 miles from the town of Fredericksburg. The land is all flat and well adapted to the culture of corn, tobacco, and wheat, and a portion of it is wood land, well timbered and as rich as any in the county. -There are good orchards containing a choice collection of fruits. The improvements are a large and spacious brick dwelling house, conveniently arranged with all necessary out houses, good water, and an ice house, inferior to none in the county. It is a healthy situation, in a genteel neighborhood, and has always been considered a healthy, desirable residence.
The Ex'rs of Wm. Herndon.
N.B. For terms apply to C. L. Stevenson, or to Albert Herndon, who is on the premises.
July 13, 1827.

The Virginia Herald
July 21, 1827 3:5
For rent, The three-story brick house on the main street, lately occupied by Henry White, deceased, and next door to Mr. Charles P. James's. The house is well finished, in good repair, and very convenient and comfortable. There is an excellent smoke house, kitchen, and a fine garden, attached to the house. -All of which will be rented very low. For terms apply to Wm. H. White.
(Fredericksburg) July 21, 1827.

The Virginia Herald
August 1, 1827 3:4
The subscriber offers for sale that valuable farm, formerly the property of Robert Patton, esq. situated on Mountain Run about half way between Stevensburg and Culpeper Courthouse, and about 31 miles from Fredericksburg. This tract contains by late accurate survey 1530 acres, nearly one half of which is in woods and well timbered. The farm is divided into 4 fields; in each of the two bordering on Mountain Run, there is about 80 acres of prime low grounds; and in the other two about 50 acres of first rate black glades, and there are at least 100 acres of the latter description of land, in woods, heavily timbered, and the soil extremely fertile, well calculated for the production of grass, corn, wheat, or tobacco. Nearly 300 acres of land are now in cultivation, and persons disposed to purchase are invited to view the crop at this time, by which means they will be enabled to judge of the value of the land. -We have no hesitation in recommending this as one of the finest farms in the country. The terms will be entirely accommodating; one fourth only will be required in hand, the balance in 5 equal annual payments, with interest from the date, and the interest to be paid annually. More than 300 acres of land will be in readiness for sowing wheat the ensuing autumn.
Philip & Samuel Slaughter.
Culpeper, August 1, 1827.

The Virginia Herald
August 25, 1827 3:5
Bloomsbury for sale.
The subscriber wishing to remove, will sell at private sale a great bargain in the tract of land on which he resides, containing 357 1/2 acres; one third and upwards of which is in woods. The farm is situated in the county of Fauquier, about 22 miles below Warrenton, the county town, and immediately on the Falmouth road -It is divided into 8 fields- two-thirds of the cleared land is highly improved, and a large proportion of low grounds, about 30 acres of which is alluvial soil, 15 of which is finely taken with timothy. The improvements are a comfortable dwelling house, 30 by 38; 4 rooms on the lower floor and 3 above -a good stone kitchen, an excellent barn, ice house, workshop, and every other necessary out house. Upon this farm there is a variety of choice and select fruit. There are many other useful improvements, which it is not necessary here to enumerate, as it is presumed that those wishing to purchase will first view the premises. It may be proper further to remark, that this farm is unusually well watered. Turkey Run passes through it and affords a good mill site. A race of 400 yards length would give a fall of 21 feet immediately before the dwelling. Terms will be made easy, and those desirous of purchasing are particularly invited to view the premises and judge for themselves.
Henry C. Dade.
August 25, 1827.

The Virginia Herald
September 26, 1827 3:5
Hawfield for sale.
Agreeable to the last will and testament of Capt. Catlett Conway, deceased, the valuable farm on which he resided called Hawfield, is offered for sale. It lies in the county of Orange, along the foot of the Southwest mountains, in that beautiful range of country partaking in character of the red land, and limestone land, there being a vein of limestone passing through the farm. This farm is within a mile of the Turnpike road leading from Orange Courthouse to Fredericksburg, and distant 30 miles from the latter place; it contains about 900 acres, is well watered, has a full proportion of wood land, and admits of division very well into two farms. There are three beautiful meadows. The surface of the land is generally level, and easily cultivated; from experiments made, plaster of Paris acts with great effect upon it. The farm is well enclosed, in a good state for cropping, and has upon it the following buildings: A large two story dwelling house, a good barn and threshing machine; two sets of stables, one framed; also two tobacco houses, one a large framed house recently built, together with Negro houses, &c. Any person wishing to purchase this land, can be shown it by Mr. Thomas Brown on the premises, or by Messrs. Hay Taliaferro, of Rose Hill, or Reuben Conway, living in the neighborhood. The terms of payment will be accommodating, and may be known on application to either of the above named gentlemen, or to the subscriber, near Stanardsville, Orange County.
John F. Conway, Ex'or of Catlett Conway, dec'd Sept. 26, 1827.

The Virginia Herald
October 10, 1827 3:5
Lands for sale.
The following tracts of land, the property of the late Daniel Carmichael, esq are offered for sale on the most accommodating terms, viz: One tract called Kinsale, in Westmoreland County, situated on the Potomac River containing 433 acres, about one half arable, the other half covered with large oak wood, with a large brick dwelling house upon it. This farm is well adapted to the growth of corn, wheat, &c. commodiously situated for navigation, and possesses every facility for getting abundantly in their season, all the various luxuries of water. -Within a half a mile of Kinsale, lies another tract of 102 acres, entirely covered with oak wood. It is believed that the timber and wood which could be spared from these tracts would more than pay for the land. Also, one other tract in Westmoreland, situated on the Rappahannock River containing about 120 acres. This land is located between the farms of Mrs. Mary I. Lee, and William Robinson, esq and is every foot arable. In King George County, the following tracts, viz: The Bristol Mines, situated on the Rappahannock River, containing from 130 to 200 acres. On this tract there is an excellent mill seat, with a fall of 27 feet, a constant stream, and within 100 yards of the Rappahannock River. It is amply furnished with timber and wood to answer any manufacturing purpose. Also, two other tracts called Piper's and Getes' in the lower edge of the county, containing from 300 to 500 acres. Attached to these lands is a grist mill, and the wood work of a saw mill nearly complete. -There is much valuable low ground and the high lands are mostly fresh, and would amply repay the cultivator. The title to the aforegoing lands is undisputed, and as it is absolutely necessary that they should be disposed of, they will be sold low, and the time of payment according to the wish of the purchasers, will be protracted to any period within 5 years. Such security only will be required as shall ensure the payments, and the interest will be required annually. Should the above named property not be sold privately before the first day of May next, it will then be offered publicly, on such terms as the subscriber may consider most to the interest of his Intestate's estate. The subscriber, living near Mattox Bridge, Westmoreland County, will give any information that may be required, and will take pleasure in showing the lands to those disposed to purchase.
Benjamin F. Stewart, Adm'r, with the will annexed of Dan'l Carmichael, dec'd.
Oct. 10, 1827.

The Virginia Herald
December 12, 1827 3:5
Public sale of land, slaves, and perishable property.
Will be sold to the highest bidder, at Green Hill, the residence of the late Ann Grasty, deceased, on Thursday the 3d day of January next, (if fair, if not the next fair day) on a credit of 1, 2, & 3 years, the said tract of land, belonging to the estate of George Grasty, deceased, containing about 450 acres; lying in the fork between the Catharpen and Main Mountain Roads, and within 25 miles of Fredericksburg, whereon there is a comfortable dwelling house, large enough for a family of moderate size, and several good out houses, situated on a healthy eminence, with a handsome yard, a good garden and a convenient grazing lot of several acres near the house, through which runs a never failing stream, and a pretty good apple and peach orchard, and several other kinds of fruit trees; such as pear, quince, plum and cherry, which seldom fail to bear. -The said plantation lies well for farming; is well watered with several never failing streams, and is in tolerably good repair, and has a crop of wheat and rye seeded on it; produces grain and grass very kindly, and is susceptible of great improvement, & being made very convenient. It is estimated that there is at least 130 acres of the said tract in wood, a part of which, is sufficiently strong to produce good tobacco, and there is on the said place, several small meadows, and as much meadow land, as but with little attention would produce as great a quantity of hay as an ordinary force would in due time secure. A further description of the said land is deemed unnecessary, as it is presumed that no person would purchase it without first viewing the premises. Possession will immediately be given after the day of sale, on the purchaser, or purchasers giving bonds with approved security, & a deed of trust on the land to secure the payment of the purchase money.
*personal estate for sale Geo Grasty, Adm'r de bonis non with the will annexed of Geo. Grasty, deceased, and Amd'r of Ann Grasty, dec'd Orange County, December 7, 1827.

The Virginia Herald
January 9, 1828 3:5
Advertisement.
I wish to rent out my dwelling house, with all the appurtenances thereto belonging, which consist of an excellent warehouse, with divisions and garnets for the reception of salt, corn, oats, and other produce; also a spacious good cellar under my adjoining house, occupied by Captain Magrath, that will contain upwards of 500 barrels of flour and other produce, with a good plank floor, on a level with the main street; also, my stable in good repair, with stalls for 5 or 6 horses. My dwelling house has 3 rooms below and 4 above stairs, and one above is a spacious and pleasant drawing-room, and the whole forms an excellent establishment for a grocery and tavern, on the main-street, leading from the county of Caroline, and the lower counties on the Northern Neck, and is an object worthy of the attention of any person inclined to pursue this line of business. *personal estate for sale* Any person wishing to rent the premises before named will please apply to the owner.
Henry T. Phillips.
Fred-g. Jan. 9, 1828.

The Virginia Herald
March 22, 1828 3:5
Land for sale.
Having an idea of removing to the west, I now offer for sale the tract of land on which I reside: It contains by recent survey 500 acres- about half of it cleared -in a high state of improvement, and under a good fence; it is well adapted for the culture of corn, wheat, tobacco, and hay. -There is a good meadow on the farm well taken in timothy and herd grass, which produces annually from 25 to 30,000 weight of hay; also two orchards. This farm is bounded by the lands of Mr. Thos. Chandler, Mr. White, Mr. Estes and others; it lies in Spotsylvania County, about 15 miles from Fredericksburg. The improvements are a good dwelling house, a barn, stables, and ice house, and all other necessary out houses- with a never failing spring of excellent water within 25 yards of the house. The terms will be accommodating -I will (if suitable to the purchaser) sell all the live and dead stock (. . . ) -The range is without a doubt the best in the country - a respectable neighborhood and a fine healthy situation. It is needless to say more, as it is presumed no person will purchase without first viewing the premises. -Apply to the subscriber on the farm.
Richard Pulliam.
March 22, 1828.

The Virginia Herald
May 7, 1828 3:4
White Hall for sale.
The subscriber intending to move from his present seat, will sell his White Hall estate, containing 600 acres; a great proportion of which is composed of Mattapony flat and low grounds, of quality inferior as a body, to none on the river. -This estate lies on the main stage road from Fredericksburg to Richmond, and is 15 miles from Fredericksburg, and 8 miles from a landing on the Rappahannock. The fertility of the soil, commodiousness of the improvements, as to dwelling house, ice house, barn, stables, and all necessary out houses, the beauty and healthiness of the situation, and agreeableness of the neighborhood, renders White Hall, in the estimation of all who know it, one of the most desirable seats on the Mattapony River, from which the house is situated on a commanding eminence, a mile and a half distant, overlooking the whole flat, which spreads in front from the house to the river bank. Persons desirous of purchasing are invited to call on the subscriber, who will show the premises, and receive proposals for private sale until the 10th September next; at which time it will (if not sold privately) be offered publicly on the premises. The purchaser can have a credit on the whole or any part. For further particulars apply to the subscriber, at White Hall, Caroline County.
Tho. W. Anderson.
May 7, 1828.

The Virginia Herald
May 31, 1828 3:5
Public sale of valuable land near the University of Virginia.
On Monday, the 4th day of August next, will be sold in Charlottesville, at the Central Hotel kept by Mr. Joel W. Brown, about 2800 acres of valuable land, being the residue of a tract of land in the neighborhood of Charlottesville, formerly belonging to the late President Monroe, and conveyed by him to the Bank of the United States, in satisfaction of a debt transferred to it by the Bank of Columbia. The whole tract is remarkably well timbered and watered, and advantageously situated; and about 500 acres of it is the best mountain quality, and the remaining part of good quality. On the mountain part there is a commodious dwelling house, with a grist and saw mill, and there are other improvements on other parts of the tract. The land has been laid off into 6 convenient divisions, and will be sold to suit the convenience of purchasers. The lands will be sold on a credit of 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 years, carrying interest from the time of sale, and bonds with approved personal security, and a lien upon the land will be required to secure the payments. For further information apply to John Watson, esq who resides about 4 miles from the land. Samuel H. Smith, Pres't, Office of Bank U.S. Washington.
May 31, 1828.

The Virginia Herald
August 23, 1828 3:4
Land for sale.
The subscriber offers for sale the estate on which he lives, formerly the property of Mr. John Hooe, deceased, containing about 800 acres, an ample proportion of which is wood land. This farm may be considered one of the most valuable estates of its size in the county. The soil is productive and capable of extensive, easy improvement. It is situated about a mile and a half from the Rappahannock River, whose navigation it is proposed to open from Fredericksburg to a distance 14 miles above it. It is about the same distance from 2 never failing mills, one of which is the large manufacturing establishment of Messrs. Wheatly and Calhoun, affording a constant and convenient market for produce. It is 6 miles distant from the manufacturing mill of Mr. Barnett, and in the immediate vicinity of several other grist mills. It is also contemplated to erect other valuable establishments on the above river. The improvements consist of a large dwelling house, with 9 rooms, passages, &c. a barn 40 feet square, shedded on 2 sides, large enough for 16 horses, with every other necessary improvement. -The situation is healthy, and comprises as much natural and artificial beauty as any other in the county. It is still further recommended by an hospitable and genteel neighborhood. The land is capable of advantageous division, and if desired will be sold in that way. -For terms apply to the subscriber.
Frederick A. Chapman.
August 23, 1828.

The Virginia Herald
August 23, 1828 3:5
Land for sale.
The subscriber is authorized to sell a tract of land in the county of Spotsylvania, 13 miles from Fredericksburg, and one mile from the turnpike leading from Fredericksburg to Swift Run Gap. A minute description of this land is deemed useless, as it is presumed no person would become a purchaser without first viewing the land. Suffice it to say, that the tract contains 391 acres, lies well and is well watered. There are several springs of excellent water, a considerable quantity of meadow land, and a good orchard of various kinds of fruits; also an immense bed of very rich iron ore. The neighborhood is genteel, society good, the situation healthy, and the title indisputable. To any person living in the lower country, that wishes to enjoy good health, it would be a good situation; and if early application is made a great bargain may be expected.
Sanford Chancellor.
near Chancellorsville.
August 23, 1828.

The Virginia Herald
September 3, 1828 3:5
Woodstock for sale.
In order to free myself from debt, I shall, on Thursday the 20th day of November ensuing, upon the premises, offer at public sale, my farm, adjoining Aquia. The improvements have been very good, but of late neglected, though yet comfortable; it being the late residence of Col. George Brent, deceased. -The situation is lofty and beautiful; the land in good heart, well enclosed; about one-third of which stands in wood; a large proportion, perhaps no less than 150 acres of the first rate low grounds, immediately at the head of tide water. There are but few farms more productive and desirable. A more minute description is thought unnecessary, as every person will doubtless examine and judge for themselves. -Nothing but necessity, to extricate me from my present embarrassments, could induce me to sell or part from it; and as a sale must be made, a great bargain might now be expected; one half the purchase money will be required in hand, the balance in two years, with interest.
*Personal property for sale.
Sale to commence at 11 o'clock.
Wm. P. Bayly.
Sept. 3, 1828.

The Virginia Herald
September 6, 1828 3:5
Land for sale.
The subscriber offers for sale the plantation on which he resides, in the upper part of Spotsylvania, lying on the north fork of the North Anna River, (about a half a mile above the junction of its south fork of the said river,) and bounded thereby more than a mile, containing 1017 acres. -about 300 acres cleared, the remainder well timbered. -There is a considerable quantity of rich low grounds on the river, and on a creek running through the plantation. The land is uncommonly well watered, having several streams running though it, and many excellent springs; from which many acres of the low grounds can be irrigated in the driest seasons. The buildings consist of a commodious dwelling house, a barn, tobacco, and corn-houses, with other necessary buildings, in good repair. Plaster of Paris works well and the soil is adapted to the growth of tobacco; several crops having lately been sold well in the Richmond market-neighborhood good, and the situation for health, equal to any in Virginia. Persons desirous will be shown the premises by the subscriber, or in his absence, by the overseer. A great bargain may be had in it, and terms very accommodating, made known by the same- and by John S. Wellford, or William A. Knox, Esq's of Fredericksburg.
Francis J. Wiatt.
Spotsylvania, Sept. 6, 1828.

The Virginia Herald
September 13, 1828 3:5
Land for sale.
The subscriber wishes to dispose of a tract of land, in Spotsylvania County, containing 164 1/4 acres. -It is bounded by the lands of Mr. Wm. Jackson Jr. and others, and has on it a very comfortable dwelling house, and other necessary out houses; also a good orchard, a garden well enclosed, and a well of excellent water in the yard, besides several streams of water passing through the land in various parts. The land lies within 5 miles of Fredericksburg, and is equal in point of fertility to any in its vicinity. Any person wishing to purchase may apply for terms to Mr. Wm. Jackson Jr. or to the subscriber.
Charles Todd.
Sept. 13, 1828.

The Virginia Herald
October 8, 1828 3:5
To lease or rent.
The large brick building lately erected by the subscriber, at Charlottesville, Virginia, is now finished; all necessary out houses nearly so, and will be completed by the first November next. The house is 50 by 55 feet, four stories, affording 30 rooms- a fire place in each: -a dining room 20 by 52 feet, with 3 fire places; ice house, kitchen, dairy, smoke house, &c. &c. all of brick and of large size: -a brick stable 100 by 28 feet, 40 stalls, granary, &c. - a well of fine water within 20 feet of the house: -a yard of about 2 acres, in which stands a beautiful grove of oak trees. The garden grounds contain more than an acre of land, to which it is proposed to add 10 or 20 acres for clover or grass lots. These buildings are finished in neat style, and stand fronting the east end of University Street, with a turnpike road passing and adjoining on the north, and a country road on the south, both, with the Lynchburg road, intersect the main western road in front of the buildings, which stand situated between the town and the University, on an eminence, commanding a fine view of both, as well as an extensive and beautiful view of the Blue Ridge, the southwest mountains, Monticello, and the adjacent country for miles in extent. The subscriber proposes to lease this establishment for a term of years, or rent it for a single year, on reasonable terms, and invites those disposed to view the premises, -The advantages of the situation are many, and may be better seen than described in an advertisement. To gentlemen, or ladies, disposed to keep a good boarding house or hotel, they are inviting, and particularly to those desirous of educating their sons at the University, or their daughters at the Charlottesville Female Academy, without expense. It is believed that regular boarders may be immediately engaged, and that if the hotel be kept in style, many families from the lower country would spent their summers at it. -Early applications are solicited, either by person or by letter; the former preferred.
Alex. Garrett.
Oct. 8, 1828.

The Virginia Herald
April 11, 1829 3:4
A valuable farm on the Rappahannock for sale.
I offer for sale my farm, on the river, 7 miles below Fredericksburg, now in a high state of improvement, adjoining the lands of Mr. Edwin Dangerfield and Mr. Samuel Gordon, Jr. and containing (with 70 1/2 acres of heavy timber and wood land contiguous) 421 acres, with every necessary building and ice house (the walls of rock) all in complete order. A large proportion of the farm is meadow, of the richest soil- the whole of which, requiring such process, has been reclaimed in the last 3 or 4 years, at considerable labour and expense- and being now in its whole extent well taken in timothy, yields an annual crop of from 90 to 100,000 wt. of hay. The farm is as healthy as any on the river, and abounds in springs of the purest water. There are upon it inexhaustible banks and beds of the richest shell marle- one of them has been extensively opened last winter and a large quantity of marle hauled on the fields intended for corn and cotton the present year- it having been found from conclusive experiments heretofore made, to act most efficiently and beneficially on those crops. A good grist mill with a cotton gin is within a quarter of a mile of my barn, and the mill house being on my land, a certain quantity of grist, which is a full supply for the farm, is executed weekly, besides other grinding, toll free, for the privilege of this location of it; and this right the purchaser of the farm will enjoy under the contract. Besides other conveniences and advantages belonging to this farm, there is one of the best and most convenient landings on the river, for shipping all its grain, &c. -at which vessels of any tonnage, trading to Fredericksburg, are always moored in bold water, very near the shore. My manager, Mr. Wm. Hart, residing on the premises will show them at any time to persons who may be disposed to purchase, and any further information which may be desired, can be obtained by application to me here, personally or by letter; application may also be made to my friends Wm. J. Roberts or John S. Wellford, Esqrs. of Fredericksburg. The payments will be easy and accommodating, and if this valuable property is not sold privately before Tuesday the 8th day of September next, it will on that day be offered at public sale, before Buck's Auction Room, in this place.
Hugh Mercer.
Fredericksburg, April 11, 1829.

The Virginia Herald
September 9, 1829 3:5
Valuable York River lands for sale.
The subscriber wishes to sell one of his farms, lying in York County, in Virginia: The farm proposed to be sold consists of 730 acres flat land, and bounded by the York River, and a creek emptying into the river called "Wormley's Creek" from which the farm takes its name. -There are about 350 acres of this land open and in cultivation, well ditched and under secure new fences; the balance of the land is heavily timbered with large yellow heart pine,red and white oak; the undergrowth of this land, not cleared, consists of myrtle, dogwood and grape-vine shrubbery- the best evidence of rich land. All necessary houses for a farm are erected- the Manager's house having 4 rooms in it. Wild-fowl, fish, and oysters, the whole year through, are taken in abundance within 100 yards of the houses; vessels, drawing 6 feet water, are loaded within 100 yards of the barn doors. The health of the farm is tested by the fact, that the proprietor has not, for the last 10 years, paid in fees to physicians, a sum amounting to $50. The subscriber will also sell one of two tenements & lots adjoining, in the town of York -The dwelling house is of brick, in good order, and the lot enclosures nearly new. The town of York is distant from the farm above advertised by water 12 miles only, & by land about 5 miles. This is a desirable property for persons wishing a residence, or the possession of property on salt water. The facilities of transporting produce from the farm to Norfolk, Baltimore, or New York, render this property valuable. The land is well adapted to the growth of all kinds of grain, tobacco, and cotton- the latter plant is now growing luxuriantly on the farm. and is becoming the staple of the eastern part of the state. Gentlemen wishing to purchase, are invited to view the farm and dwellings, which will be shown by the Manager, living at "Wormley's Creek", or by the subscriber in person.
Thomas Griffin.
York-Town, Sept. 9, 1829.

The Virginia Herald
January 30, 1830 3:4
I will sell a great bargain in a handsome, well improved, and productive farm on the river Ny, 10 miles from Fredericksburg. The tract contains 436 3/8 acres, of which about 150 are in timber - the balance (most of it recently cleared) is laid out into 4 fields, each well supplied with water, and annually improving in its crop- comprehending about 75 acres of low grounds, well drained and highly productive. The improvements (all arranged by myself within a few years past) comprise all the buildings necessary for the comfort of a family, and to the convenience of a farm: among the latter, a superior barn, and stables, with timothy meadow adjoining, and a good orchard. Clover succeeds well, and the land is lately prepared to receive it to great advantage. If a good soil, healthfulness, and beauty of situation, good water, and a good neighborhood with contiguity to market and to mills, render property desirable- this farm, may with confidence, be recommended; and those disposed to purchase, are invited to call upon me, and see whether it is over-rated, either in description or in price.
Addison M. Lewis.
Salem, Spotsylvania, Jan. 30th, 1830.

The Virginia Herald
February 10, 1830 3:4
A credit sale of land.
This valuable tract of land lies near the Gum Spring in the county of Loudoun, and on the road from the Gum Spring to Leesburg, 12 miles south of the latter place, adjoining the lands of Captain C. Lewis, Major W. B. Harrison, James McFarland, and others. The buildings consist of a comfortable dwelling, containing 8 rooms, 4 of which are on the lower floor -commodious stables, barn, servants' houses, ice house, &c. all of which are nearly new. It is watered with several fine springs and a stream of water passing nearly through the center of the land. -It is supposed to be nearly one third in wood. There are large and productive meadows, there being about 100 acres of bottom land, the greater part of which is well set in timothy. The balance of the land is in a good state of cultivation, and lies well for farming. One fourth of the purchase money will be required- a long credit will be given for the balance by the purchaser giving approved security. The subscriber has also a tract of land in the same neighborhood containing about 200 acres, 1/2 in wood, which he would sell under similar conditions. Persons desirous of buying land would do well to delay no time in taking a look at this, as a bargain will be given. For further particulars inquire of the subscriber, near Paris, Fauquier County, Va.
C. J. Stovin.
Feb. 10, 1830.

The Virginia Herald
March 6, 1830 3:5
Land for sale.
I wish to sell between 6 and 700 acres of land: It is a part of my land in King George County, Virginia, whereon I reside known by the name of Bedford.-the part of my land that I wish to sell, lies on the western side of my estate, contiguous to the land of Mr. Johnson, called Hilton, extending from the main road leading to Potomac Academy, down to Chotank Creek- embracing within its limits a large portion of high, flat, and bottom land. -This land would make a desirable farm of itself, possessing all necessary requisites therefore: such as a beautiful site for a residence- commanding a very extensive view of the Potomac River and the adjacent country- overlooking, most beautifully, many of the neighboring farms -situated in a rich and polished neighborhood -and with respect to fertility, the soil of this land is equal, if not superior, to any land in the county; it will bear a comparison with any. The known fertility of my Bedford estate renders it almost unnecessary to say anything in commendation of this part which I wish to sell; I will only add it is equal to any part of my estate. -The flat land is rich and light-the high land is rich and light, of a deep black soil- and the bottom land is equal to any in the state. -All this land is peculiarly adapted to the growth of tobacco, corn, wheat, oats, and cotton, upon which the most abundant crops are raised. -Upon the bottom land extensive timothy meadows might be made, and at the same time this land is sufficiently high to raise with certainty the heaviest crops of tobacco, corn, wheat, &c. -Such is the peculiar richness of the high lands or hills, the European Grape, from experiment, has been found to thrive and produce in the most abundant manner on them. -I have now a thriving vineyard of about 2 acres on this land, which might be extended to an extent; and I have no doubt from the experiments that I have made, that the cultivation of grape might here be pursued with great profit, and would become a source of great wealth. There are no buildings on this land; it lies convenient to the navigation of the Potomac, within 5 or 6 hours sail to the District of Columbia, and 24 hours to Baltimore. The terms of sale will be made known by application to the subscriber, living near Hampstead Post-Office, King George County, Virginia. Any letters addressed as above will be promptly attended to.
Henry Fitzhugh.
March 6, 1830.

The Virginia Herald
March 13, 1830 3:5
I intend going to the western country, and will sell a bargain in a productive and beautiful little farm, containing 170 acres- 10 miles from Fredericksburg adjoining the lands of John C. Browne, John McCoull and others. About one third of this land is in timber, of rich soil, the balance laid out in 4 fields, and well improved; a good dwelling house, ice house, and all necessary out houses or the comfort of a small family; from 6 to 700 peach and apple trees, the most of which are not out on fresh land. A large portion of this land has lately been cleared, inferior to none in the county. There are 2 never failing springs of excellent water, both convenient, with a sufficient portion of water to each field, with the buildings in the center. The beauty of this situation and the productiveness of this farm, entitles it to an examination, at least by those who may wish to buy. It would be exchanged for Negroes, if it is preferred or terms, &c. apply to the subscriber on the premises.
Willis Landram.
Spotsylvania, March 13, 1830.

The Virginia Herald
March 20, 1830 3:5
I wish to dispose of the following property, viz: My summer residence, near Captain George Hamilton's, within 4 miles of Fredericksburg, containing about 40 acres, nearly one half of which is in wood, upon which is a new dwelling house, 36 feet long by 22 wide, and all necessary out houses, (except stables) perfectly new. It is believed that no situation in our section of the country is more healthy than this. I would, if required, include a greater quantity of land.
Also- my farm called King Capisco, lying on Potomac River, at the mouth of Nomony, containing about 800 acres, which is a part of that well known estate, named Cabin Point. This land is abundantly stocked with white and red oak and chestnut timber. It lies as level as could be wished, and is considered as fertile as any land on the river. The best fish, oysters and wild fowl in their seasons are easily procured. A credit of 3, 6 & 9 years, carrying interest from the date, will be given, upon the payment being satisfactorily secured. Any person wishing to purchase, will communicate with me at Mansfield, near Fredericksburg, which will meet with prompt attention.
Wm. Bernard.
March 20, 1830.

The Virginia Herald
June 5, 1830 3:4
A great bargain! The subscriber offers a great bargain in the farm on which he now resides called White Hall, 15 miles from Fredericksburg, and situated immediately on the stage road leading from Richmond to Fredericksburg, containing 600 acres, a great proportion of which is Mattapony flat. The buildings, eligibly situated on an eminence, consist of a large dwelling house, ice-house, barn stables, &c. -The situation is handsome and remarkably healthy. Also, in the farm called Glebe, 8 miles from Fredericksburg, and a short distance from the Rappahannock River, and bounded by the lands of Messrs. Dangerfield, Gordon, Conway, and Lewis -containing 300 acres, about 20 of which are marsh land calculated for a meadow. There is an overseer's house and out houses on the farm, and a beautiful and commanding situation for a dwelling house. The healthiness, fertility of soil, and contiguity to market, together with other advantages possessed by these farms, render them desirable. The purchaser can have a credit on the whole or any part of the purchase money. For further particulars apply to the subscriber at White Hall, Caroline County.
Thomas W. Anderson.
June 5, 1830.

The Virginia Herald
June 5, 1830 3:4
Land for sale.
I wish to dispose of my farm in Fauquier County, about 3 miles from Warrenton, containing 400 acres. There is upon the land a very genteel dwelling house, which has lately undergone a thorough repair, containing 4 rooms and a large cellar, and all other out houses necessary for the comfortable accommodation of a genteel family. Near the house is a spring of superior water, covered by a stone spring house, which renders the use of ice almost unnecessary. For health it is not exceeded by any place in the county; and independent of its immediate neighborhood, its proximity to the courthouse as good society as is to be found any where. It is well adapted to the cultivation of wheat and corn, and has on it an extensive and productive meadow of timothy. There is also on the land a corn mill, running two pair of 4 foot stones, with a large country custom. The character of this farm is well known to the whole neighborhood, where information can be obtained by any person desiring to purchase who cannot make it convenient to visit in person. (*Stock, &c. for sale . . .) Few opportunities will offer of getting a country residence in as good order and so desirable in most respects; and I offer it for sale because as I find myself not sufficiently acquainted with the proper management of a farm. For terms apply to Mr. James Vass, Fredericksburg, or to the subscriber, living on the land.
James C. Vass.
Fauquier, June 5, 1830.

The Virginia Herald
July 7, 1830 3:4
Valuable land for sale.
That rich and desirable plantation called Pleasant Green, situated in the county of King George, formerly the property of Chandler Fowke, deceased, and lying immediately on the Potomac River, adjoining the lands of the late Col. Austin Smith, Mr. Thacker Washington, and Dangerfield Lewis, Esq. containing 480 acres. This land is peculiarly well adapted to the culture of tobacco, corn, rye and oats; and it is not inferior to other lands in this part of the country for wheat. -There is an abundance of timber and wood upon the land for its support, consisting of oak, poplar, hickory, cedar, and pine. Any person disposed to purchase will be shown the land by John Hooe, living in the neighborhood. An indisputable title will be made, and possession given at the end of the year. $2000 of the purchase money will be required to be paid down, and the balance in one annual installment, with a lien to secure the last payment. The improvements are two dwelling houses one near the bank of the river, and the other at the southern extremity of the estate; each having two rooms below and two above; a good barn shedded on one side, which is fitted up for the stable; a corn-house and most of the necessary out houses. This land has upon it a good orchard, consisting of a variety of fruits; and has also attached to it a winter and spring fishery, immediately below that of Col. A. Smith, deceased, and yielding no inferiority to that well known and valuable establishment. In point of health this plantation is equal to that of any other similarly situated on the Potomac. Its situation embraces a fine society, and its particular location is most enchanting, commanding a spread of water almost as full and extensive as human vision can take in. The above property will be offered at public auction on the premises the 20th of August next.
Mary Fowke.
July 7, 1830.

The Virginia Herald
September 11, 1830 3:4
Lands for sale.
The subscriber being determined to remove from the lower country, now offers for sale her well known farm called Cherry Grove, with two other tracts nearly adjoining, all of which are near about the same size, and containing in the whole about 400 acres, and the greater part binding on the road leading from the Bowling-Green to Port-Royal, 9 miles from the former, and 5 from the latter place, and is well watered with springs and other never failing water courses. Cherry Grove, the family residence, is handsomely situated a short distance from the road, and has on it a never failing spring of pure water, besides several other springs and water courses. The improvements are a good dwelling house with 4 rooms on the lower floor and 2 on the upper, with a porch on one side and a portico on the other- together with all the out houses necessary for a farm of its size- with an excellent garden and a productive apple and peach orchard. It is deemed unnecessary to give a further description of these lands, (more than to merely add that they are generally adapted to the culture of grain and cotton, and the situation as healthy as any in the lower part of Virginia) as it is presumed that persons disposed to purchase will of course view the premises. Should these lands not be disposed of privately before Friday the 15th day of October next, they will on that day, if fair, if not the next fair day, be sold on the premises at public auction, upon a credit of 6 & 12 months, either all together or by the separate tracts. Any person disposed to make a private person can apply to my son, Reuben Saunders, lower end of this county, or to the subscriber.
Elizabeth Saunders.
Caroline County, Sept. 11, 1830.

The Virginia Herald
September 22, 1830 3:4
For rent, And possession given the 1st October next, the dwelling part of the house adjoining the store of Samuel Phillips & Son. The part of this establishment for rent contains 7 rooms in good order; 4 of them handsomely papered, and a large piazza in front. A convenient smoke house and kitchen are on the premises. The whole has lately undergone repairs, and was neatly painted. A very large and productive garden adds very much to the convenience and comfort of this situation. For terms apply to Samuel Phillips & Son.
(Fredericksburg) Sept. 22, 1830.

The Virginia Herald
November 17, 1830 3:2
For sale or rent, and possession given the 1st Jan. next.
That well known and desirable situation in King George County, called Hampstead. On the premises, and in good repair, are a fine airy dwelling house, store house, post office, warehouse, stables, and all other necessary out houses; together with a fine lot, containing 2 acres of rich soil. The steamboats plying on the Potomac River, stop at Boyd's Hole, which is all in sight, 3 or 4 times a week. For a store and tavern, Hampstead possesses all the advantages that could be required, and is not surpassed by any situation in the county. A further description is deemed unnecessary as any person wishing to purchase or rent, will view the premises. For terms, which will be made accommodating apply to Samuel Phillips & Son.
Nov. 17, 1830.

The Virginia Herald
November 17, 1830 3:3
For sale, A valuable farm, in the county of Spotsylvania, known by the name of Hartfield, containing nearly 1000 acres, two miles above Waller's Tavern, and in the vicinity of the Gold Region. This farm contains much really good land, with an ample supply of wood, a number of never failing springs of pure water in every field. The buildings are large and convenient, the dwelling has 5 rooms and a commodious passage on the first floor, 7 rooms above, exclusive of the garret, a cellar under the whole, and a number of closets conveniently located in various parts of the house. The out buildings are numerous and in good repair. In point of health, no place in Virginia is superior to it; The neighborhood is composed of families of intelligence and respectability, affording a delightful society. It rarely occurs that so desirable a situation is offered for sale in this part of the country. Between 60 and 70 bushels of wheat have been seeded upon good land. Any one disposed to purchase will make application to Edward C. Hill, near the premises, or John & Archibald Hart at Fredericksburg. Johnson Faulkner, the overseer will show the land to any person wishing to view it. Unless a private sale should be made before the 9th December next, it will on that day be offered on the premises, at public auction, the terms to be made known on that day.
The Legatees.
*personal estate for sale.